Texts

Dinnshenchas Érenn, version A

  • verse
  • Early Irish poetry, Medieval Irish literature, Dinnshenchas Érenn
Version A of the Dinnshenchas Érenn represents the metrical recension, i.e. a recension consisting almost exclusively of verse, as opposed to the prose recension of B or the mixed recension of C. It is attested only in the Book of Leinster. Other portions of the same manuscript (pp. 159-160 and 165-170) contain version B. See further Dinnshenchas Érenn.
Manuscripts

The texts of version A are distributed over various sections of the Book of Leinster. The original arrangement of these manuscript sections has not been preserved intact and an unknown number of leaves appear now to be lost. The writing appears to be the work of two scribes.

Gwynn suggests a reconstruction of the original order as follows:

Form
verse (primary)
prose (secondary)
Associated items
Dinnshenchas of Achall and other placesDinnshenchas of Achall and other placesDinnshenchas poem mostly on Achall, i.e. the Hill of Skreen, Co. Meath, with prose on Duma nEirc and Duma nAichle. Both the poem and the prose text offer the story according to which Achall died of grief for her brother Erc, who was killed in vengeance for Cú Chulainn’s death, and was buried in the mound that would bear her name.Dinnshenchas of Ailech IDinnshenchas of Ailech IPoem on the dinnshenchas of Ailech.Dinnshenchas of AlendDinnshenchas of AlendProse and verse dinnshenchas of AlendDinnshenchas of Almu IDinnshenchas of Almu IDinnshenchas poem on Almu (the Hill of Allen, Co. Kildare), which recounts the tale of the conception of Finn mac Cumaill.Dinnshenchas of Ard LemnachtDinnshenchas of Ard LemnachtText on the dinnshenchas of Ard Lemnacht.Dinnshenchas of Ard RuideDinnshenchas of Ard Ruide

Dinnshenchas of Ard Ruide, a royal seat in Munster.

Dinnshenchas of Áth Clíath CúalannDinnshenchas of Áth Clíath CúalannDinnshenchas of Áth Clíath CúalannDinnshenchas of Áth Clíath MedraigeDinnshenchas of Áth Clíath MedraigeDinnshenchas on Áth Clíath Medraige, in prose and verse.Dinnshenchas of Áth Fadat IDinnshenchas of Áth Fadat IProse introduction and poem on the dinnshenchas on Áth Fadat, cast as a dialogue between Etan and Fadat.Dinnshenchas of Áth Fadat IIDinnshenchas of Áth Fadat IIPoem on the dinnshenchas on Áth Fadat, with a prose introduction in manuscripts of recension C. It gives an alternative story to Áth Fadat I, which it usually follows in manuscripts of recensions A and C.Dinnshenchas of Áth Líac Find IDinnshenchas of Áth Líac Find I

Tract on the dinnshenchas of Áth Líac Find, a ford of the Shannon.

Dinnshenchas of Áth LúainDinnshenchas of Áth LúainDinnshenchas on Áth LúainDinnshenchas of Bairend ChermainDinnshenchas of Bairend ChermainDinnshenchas of Bairend Chermain. Gwynn suggests that “The name of this place is preserved by the river Burren in Co. Carlow”.Dinnshenchas of Belach ConglaisDinnshenchas of Belach ConglaisDinnshenchas of Belach ConglaisDinnshenchas of Belach nDúirgeinDinnshenchas of Belach nDúirgeinDinnshenchas of Belach nDúirgein (Road of Dúrgen, unidentified)Dinnshenchas of Belach GabráinDinnshenchas of Belach GabráinTexts in prose and verse relating variant versions of dinnshenchas on Belach Gabráin (B. nGabráin, B. Gabrán), perhaps Gowran Pass (Co. Kilkenny) or more probably, according to Edward Gwynn, the pass of that name in Maistiu (Co. Kildare). This pass (belach) is said to derive its name from the hound Gabrán whose heart broke (i.e. it died) from a fatiguing and unsuccessful pursuit of a swine whose name appears exclusively in the genitive, Lurgan (cf. lurga, lurgu ‘shanks’). The swine escaped from it underground in the bog of Allen (móin Almaine). The prose story identifies the hiding place as Loch Lurgan.Dinnshenchas of Benn BóguineDinnshenchas of Benn BóguineDinnshenchas of Benn BóguineDinnshenchas of Benn Étair IDinnshenchas of Benn Étair IPoem on the Hill of Howth, Co. Dublin.Dinnshenchas of Benn Étair IIDinnshenchas of Benn Étair IIPoem on the dinnshenchas of Benn Étair (Hill of Howth, Co. Dublin)Dinnshenchas of BerbaDinnshenchas of BerbaDinnshenchas of the River Barrow (Berba)Dinnshenchas of Boand IDinnshenchas of Boand IDinnshenchas poem of the River Boyne (Boand).Dinnshenchas of BréchmagDinnshenchas of BréchmagText on the dinnshenchas of Bréchmag.Dinnshenchas of Brug na Bóinne IIDinnshenchas of Brug na Bóinne IIPoem on the dinnshenchas of Brug na Bóinne.Dinnshenchas of Carman (Carmun)Dinnshenchas of Carman (Carmun)Dinnshenchas of Carman.Dinnshenchas of Carn ConaillDinnshenchas of Carn ConaillDinnshenchas poem on Carn ConaillDinnshenchas of Carn FeradaigDinnshenchas of Carn FeradaigDinnshenchas of Carn Feradaig, “probably Cahirnarry, Limerick” (Gwynn).Dinnshenchas of Carn FurbaideDinnshenchas of Carn FurbaidePoem on the dinnshenchas of Carn Furbaide (near Granard), also known as Carn Uí Chathbath.Carn MáilCarn MáilDinnshenchas of Carn MáilDinnshenchas of Carn Uí NéitDinnshenchas of Carn Uí NéitTract on the dinnshenchas of Carn Uí Néit. It tells of a fight between Lug (of the Túatha Dé) and Bres son of Elatha (of the Fomoire).Dinnshenchas of CeilbeDinnshenchas of CeilbeDinnshenchas of Ceilbe.Dinnshenchas of Céis ChorainnDinnshenchas of Céis ChorainnDinnshenchas of Céis ChorainnDinnshenchas of Cell ChorbbáinDinnshenchas of Cell ChorbbáinDinnshenchas of Cell Chorbbáin (Kilcorban).Dinnshenchas of Cenn CuirrigDinnshenchas of Cenn CuirrigDinnshenchas of Cenn Cuirrig.Dinnshenchas of Cenn FebratDinnshenchas of Cenn FebratTract on the dinnshenchas of Cenn Febrat.Dinnshenchas of Cenn FinichairDinnshenchas of Cenn FinichairDinnshenchas of Cenn FinichairDinnshenchas of Cnocc RafannDinnshenchas of Cnocc RafannDinnshenchas of Cnocc RafannDinnshenchas of CrechmáelDinnshenchas of CrechmáelDinnshenchas of CrechmáelDinnshenchas of DescertDinnshenchas of DescertDinnshenchas of Descert, possibly Descert LaigenDinnshenchas of Druim nAssailDinnshenchas of Druim nAssailDinnshenchas of Druim nAssail.Dinnshenchas of Druim ClíabDinnshenchas of Druim Clíab

Dinnshenchas of Druim Clíab.

Dinnshenchas of Druim CriaichDinnshenchas of Druim Criaich

Poem and prose text on the dinnshenchas of Druim Criaich (Drumcree, Co. Westmeath), which is here said to have been known as Druim Cró and Druim n-úar nAirthir. In the Book of Leinster, the poem is attributed to Cuán ua Lothcháin (d. 1024). The poem falls into two sections. The story of the first is that of the quarrel between Eochu Feidlech, high-king of Ireland, and his three sons known as the three Findemna. On the night before the battle of Druim Criaich, in which the brothers are killed, their sister Clothru sleeps with each one of them in order to produce royal offspring. She later gives birth to Lugaid Riab nDerg, high-king of Ireland.

Dinnshenchas of Druim nDairbrechDinnshenchas of Druim nDairbrechDinnshenchas of Druim nDairbrechDinnshenchas of Druim Fíngin IDinnshenchas of Druim Fíngin I

Short  poem (3 qq) on the dinnshenchas of Druim Fíngin.

Dinnshenchas of Druim Fíngin IIDinnshenchas of Druim Fíngin IIPoem on the dinnshenchas of Druim Fíngin.Dinnshenchas of DubthírDinnshenchas of DubthírDinnshenchas of DubthírDinnshenchas of DuiblinnDinnshenchas of DuiblinnDinnshenchas of Duiblind, identified by O'Curry as the Poolbeg in the Liffey region.Dinnshenchas of Duma Oena, Duma Ilia, Áth EgoneDinnshenchas of Duma Oena, Duma Ilia, Áth EgoneShort poem on the dinnshenchas of Duma Oena, Duma Ilia and Áth Egone.Dinnshenchas of Dún CuircDinnshenchas of Dún CuircShort poem on the dinnshenchas of Dún Cuirc.Dinnshenchas of Dún nGabailDinnshenchas of Dún nGabailDinnshenchas of Dún nGabail in Cuthraige on the Liffey.Dinnshenchas of Dún MáscDinnshenchas of Dún MáscDinnshenchas of Dún MáscDinnshenchas of Eó Rossa and other treesDinnshenchas of Eó Rossa and other treesTract on the dinnshenchas of five special trees of Ireland: the yew of Ross (Eó Rossa), the Yew of Mag Mugna (Eó Mugna), the Tree of Belach Dathí (Bile Dathí or Cráeb Belaig Dathi), the Tree of Tortu (Bile Tortain) and the Tree or Ash of Uisnech (Cráeb or Unnius Uisnig).Dinnshenchas of Ess Rúaid IDinnshenchas of Ess Rúaid ITract on the dinnshenchas of Ess Rúaid (Assaroe, on the r. Erne, Co. Donegal).Dinnshenchas of FaffandDinnshenchas of FaffandDinnshenchas of FaffandDinnshenchas of Fert MedbaDinnshenchas of Fert MedbaDinnshenchas of Fert Medba.Dinnshenchas of Fid nGaibliDinnshenchas of Fid nGaibliDinnshenchas of Fid nGaibli (Feeguile).Dinnshenchas of Findloch CeraDinnshenchas of Findloch CeraDinnshenchas on Findloch CeraDinnshenchas of FornochtDinnshenchas of FornochtDinnshenchas of Fornocht, formerly Druim Den.Dinnshenchas of LaiginDinnshenchas of LaiginDinnshenchas of the Laigin.Dinnshenchas of Laigin IDinnshenchas of Laigin IDinnshenchas of the Laigin, referring to the tale of the destruction of Dind Ríg.Dinnshenchas of Laigin IIDinnshenchas of Laigin IIDinnshenchas of the LaiginDinnshenchas of Lecht hÉileDinnshenchas of Lecht hÉileDinnshenchas of Lecht hÉileDinnshenchas of LégeDinnshenchas of LégeText on the dinnshenchas of LégeDinnshenchas of Lía NothainDinnshenchas of Lía NothainDinnshenchas of Lía NothainDinnshenchas of LiamuinDinnshenchas of LiamuinDinnshenchas of LiamuinDinnshenchas of Turloch Sílinne, al. Loch mBlonacDinnshenchas of Turloch Sílinne, al. Loch mBlonacDinnshenchas for Loch mBlonac (formerly Turloch Sílinde ‘Sílenn's old home’) and Loch Cairrgin (formerly Loch Sílinde and Cúil Sílinde, Silenn's new home as well as her place of death).Dinnshenchas of Loch nDechetDinnshenchas of Loch nDechetDinnshenchas of Loch nDechetDinnshenchas of Loch DergdercDinnshenchas of Loch DergdercDinnshenchas on Loch Dergderc: how Eochaid mac Luchta, king of Munster, gave up an eye to satisfy the cruel demands of the Ulster poet Ferchertne mac Athló and washed the bleeding socket.Dinnshenchas of Loch nÉrneDinnshenchas of Loch nÉrneDinnshenchas of Loch nÉrneDinnshenchas of Loch GarmanDinnshenchas of Loch GarmanText, in prose and verse, on the dinnshenchas of Loch Garman.Dinnshenchas of Loch LéinDinnshenchas of Loch LéinDinnshenchas of Loch LéinDinnshenchas of Loch NéillDinnshenchas of Loch NéillDinnshenchas of Loch NéillDinnshenchas of Loch RíDinnshenchas of Loch RíDinnshenchas of Loch RíDinnshenchas of Loch RíachDinnshenchas of Loch RíachDinnshenchas of Loch RíachDinnshenchas of LuimnechDinnshenchas of LuimnechDinnshenchas of LuimnechDinnshenchas of Lumman Tige SrafáinDinnshenchas of Lumman Tige SrafáinPoem in praise of Aodh’s shield.Dinnshenchas of Mag nAidneDinnshenchas of Mag nAidneDinnshenchas on Mag nAidneDinnshenchas of Mag Dá GésiDinnshenchas of Mag Dá GésiDinnshenchas of Mag Dá Gési (Mag Dá Géise).Dinnshenchas of Mag Femin, Mag Fera, Mag FeaDinnshenchas of Mag Femin, Mag Fera, Mag FeaText on the dinnshenchas of Mag Femin (Mag Femen).Dinnshenchas of Mag Femin IIDinnshenchas of Mag Femin IIPoem on the dinnshenchas of Mag Femin. In the Book of Leinster version, the poem is presented as a dialogue between the poets Cuimíne and Mac Dá Cherda.Dinnshenchas of Mag LifeDinnshenchas of Mag LifeDinnshenchas of Mag LifeDinnshenchas of Mag LuirgDinnshenchas of Mag LuirgDinnshenchas of Mag LuirgDinnshenchas of Mag MucramaDinnshenchas of Mag MucramaDinnshenchas of Mag MucramaDinnshenchas of Mag MuirisceDinnshenchas of Mag MuirisceDinnshenchas of Mag MuirisceDinnshenchas of Mag RaigneDinnshenchas of Mag RaigneText on the dinnshenchas of Mag Raigne.Dinnshenchas of Mag SlechtDinnshenchas of Mag SlechtDinnshenchas of Mag SlechtDinnshenchas of Maistiu IDinnshenchas of Maistiu IText on the dinnshenchas of Maistiu, commonly identified with Mullaghmast, Co. Kildare.Dinnshenchas of Maistiu IIDinnshenchas of Maistiu IIPoem on the dinnshenchas on Maistiu.Dinnshenchas of MideDinnshenchas of MideDinnshenchas of Mide.Dinnshenchas of Móin Gai GlaisDinnshenchas of Móin Gai GlaisDinnshenchas of Móin Gai Glais, in prose and verse. When Cúldub mac Déin slays one Fidrad at Samain, Gae Glas, grandson of Lug, comes to avenge Fidrad's death and kills Cúldub with a spear. The prose version, which is generally fuller, adds that the spear entered the ground and was not found until Máel Odrán dug it up and used it to kill Aithechdae, king of Uí Máil. The prose also identifies the spear as the Carr of Belach Duirgen.Dinnshenchas of NásDinnshenchas of NásDinnshenchas of Nás.Dinnshenchas of NemthennDinnshenchas of NemthennDinnshenchas of NemthennDinnshenchas of Ochan (Ochonn Midi)Dinnshenchas of Ochan (Ochonn Midi)Texts on a burial mound near Tara, relating a version of the death of Níall Noígiallach.Dinnshenchas of Port LáirgeDinnshenchas of Port LáirgeDinnshenchas of Port Láirge (Waterford)Dinnshenchas of Ráith ChnámrossaDinnshenchas of Ráith ChnámrossaDinnshenchas of Ráith ChnámrossaDinnshenchas of Ráith CrúachainDinnshenchas of Ráith Crúachain

Dinnshenchas on Ráith Crúachain

Dinnshenchas of Ráith ÉsaDinnshenchas of Ráith ÉsaDinnshenchas of Róiriu in Uí FailgeDinnshenchas of Róiriu in Uí Failge

Dinnshenchas of Róiriu in Uí Failge (Róiriu i nUíb Failge).

Dinnshenchas of Róiriu in Uí MuiredaigDinnshenchas of Róiriu in Uí MuiredaigDinnshenchas of Róiriu in in Uí Muiredaig (Róiriu i nUíb Muiredaig)Dinnshenchas of Sinann IDinnshenchas of Sinann I

Poem on the dinnshenchas of the River Shannon (Sinann).

Dinnshenchas of Slíab BladmaDinnshenchas of Slíab BladmaDinnshenchas of Slíab BladmaDinnshenchas of Slíab CúaDinnshenchas of Slíab CúaDinnshenchas of Slíab Cúa.Dinnshenchas of Slíab Echtge IDinnshenchas of Slíab Echtge IDinnshenchas on Slíab EchtgeDinnshenchas of Slíab Echtge IIDinnshenchas of Slíab Echtge II

Dinnshenchas on Slíab Echtge.

Dinnshenchas of Slíab Fúait IDinnshenchas of Slíab Fúait IIrish poem on the dinnshenchas for Slíab Fúait as represented by a single copy in the Book of Leinster.Dinnshenchas of Slíab Mairge IDinnshenchas of Slíab Mairge IPoem on the dinnshenchas of Slíab MairgeDinnshenchas of Slíab Mairge IIDinnshenchas of Slíab Mairge IITract on the dinnshenchas of Slíab Mairge.Dinnshenchas of Slíab MisDinnshenchas of Slíab MisTract on the dinnshenchas of Slíab Mis.Dinnshenchas of Slige DálaDinnshenchas of Slige Dála

Dinnshenchas tale, in prose and in verse, which begins with an etymological explanation of Slige Dála and proceeds to account for the names of the five chief roads leading out of Tara (Slige Dála, Slige Mór, Slige Midlúachra, Slige Chúalann and Slige Assail). In copies of the prose text of recension C, the story of Airne Fíngein is cited as a source and followed by a poem said to have been uttered by Fíngen mac Luchta on the night he witnessed the wonders from that tale.

Dinnshenchas of Snám Dá ÉnDinnshenchas of Snám Dá ÉnProse tract and poem giving two versions of the dinnshenchas of Snám Dá Én. The first story also explains the origin of the names of Áth Lúain, Móin Tíre Náir and Mag nEstin.Dinnshenchas of Srúb BrainDinnshenchas of Srúb BrainDinnshenchas of Srúb Brain. The placename is etymologised as ‘Raven’s Bill’ with reference to an account of how Cú Chulainn killed a multitude of giant ravens or black birds and placed the bill of the last bird on the rock (Srúb Brain).Dinnshenchas of TailtiuDinnshenchas of TailtiuPoem on the dinsenchas of Tailtiu (Co. Meath).Temair IITemair II

Dinnshenchas of Temair.

Dinnshenchas of Tipra SengarmnaDinnshenchas of Tipra Sengarmna

Text on the dinnshenchas of Tipra Sengarmna.

Dinnshenchas of Túag Inbir and Loch nEchachDinnshenchas of Túag Inbir and Loch nEchach

Dinnshenchas poem concerning Túag Inbir and Loch nEchach.

Dinnshenchas of Tulach EógainDinnshenchas of Tulach EógainDinnshenchas of Tulach Eógain

Classification

Early Irish poetryEarly Irish poetry
...

Medieval Irish literatureMedieval Irish literature
...

Dinnshenchas Érenn
Dinnshenchas Érenn
id. 6712

Sources

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] [tr.] Gwynn, E. J. [ed. and tr.], The metrical dindsenchas, 5 vols, Todd Lecture Series 8–9–10–11–12, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, 1903–1935.
CELT – vol. 1 (edition): <link> CELT – vol. 1 (translation): <link> CELT – vol. 2 (edition): <link> CELT – vol. 2 (translation): <link> CELT – vol. 3 (edition): <link> CELT – vol. 3 (translation): <link> CELT – vol. 4 (edition): <link> CELT – vol. 4 (translation): <link> Internet Archive – vols 1-3: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 2: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 4: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 5: <link>

Secondary sources (select)

Gwynn, E. J., The metrical dindsenchas, 5 vols, vol. 5, Todd Lecture Series 12, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, 1935.
Internet Archive – vol. 5: <link>
Gwynn, E. J., “The Dindshenchas in the Book of Uí Maine”, Ériu 10 (1926–1928): 68–91.
Ó Concheanainn, Tomás, “The three forms of Dinnshenchas Érenn [part 1]”, Journal of Celtic Studies 3 (1981–1983): 88–101.
Ó Concheanainn, Tomás, “The three forms of Dinnshenchas Érenn [part 2]”, Journal of Celtic Studies 3 (1981–1983): 102–131.
Ó Concheanainn, Tomás, “An dinnsheanchas próis”, Ph.D. thesis: National University of Ireland, Galway, 1977.
Thurneysen, Rudolf, Die irische Helden- und Königsage bis zum siebzehnten Jahrhundert, Halle: Niemeyer, 1921.  
comments: Part 1 (chapters 1-23): Allgemeines; Part 2 (chapters 1-85): Die Ulter Sage
Internet Archive: <link>
36–46 direct link
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
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May 2012, last updated: August 2021