Agents



Agents persons, peoples and institutions

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About the selected image
Ruairí Óg Ó Mórdha, from The Image of Irelande by John Derricke (Plate 11). Source.

A module for identifying agents - encompassing persons, peoples and organisations - and managing information about them has been around for many years, continually evolving as time went by, but what was absent all this time is a public interface for accessing relevant data in a user-friendly way.

This is a first attempt at offering such an interface, which is provided "as-is" and should be considered beta-quality for now (not that there is any official product release cycle as such but using the label is a convenient means to sound the right alarm bells). It currently consists of a basic search, aggregated data overviews for individual agents, and hover-card labels that you will meet elsewhere in the catalogue.

I am aware of duplicates, uneven coverage and other shortcomings that typically arise from the progressive nature of this website or simply, lack of personpower. An earlier version of the interface was available to editors partly because it helps us address some of those issues. None of these objections, however, seemed to weigh heavily against the alternative, which is having nothing at all to offer.

Note that for convenience's sake, many agents are not formally indexed but are nonetheless included by exclusive virtue of being linked. It is a wonderful forte of the system that allows us to retrieve and bring together disparate data from disparate data sources, but some useful metadata will be missing and discoverability is more limited as a result. For instance, we may be linking to a scribe whose name and associated data can be retrieved and presented, but without, say, a floruit it will be difficult to find this person within the appropriate time range. I say "difficult" because it is possible, to an extent, to rely on the dates we have, if any, for associated objects (manuscripts, scribal hands), but such a circuitous approach comes with limitations of its own and is not necessarily methodologically sound.

Meanwhile, I hope that the new interface will improve your experience in using this website. Next up are thematic categories for scribes (in the broadest, non-pejorative sense of the word), authors and scholars.

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People
Institutions

Randomised results

Scribes
  • Patrick Sandford
  • Seán Ó Conaire [ob. 1773]
    c.1739–1773
    Irish priest and scholar
  • Eoghan Ó Caoimh
    1656–1726
    Munster poet and scribe.
  • Anonymous [LU scribe H]
    s. xii
    Anonymous scribe, usually known simply as H or the Interpolator, who significantly annotated, revised and interpolated parts of the Lebor na hUidre (RIA MS 23 E 25) and sometimes intercalated leaves to add material. The modern name H stands for ‘Homilist’, which stems from the fact that he added two homilies, Scéla laí brátha and Scéla na hEsérgi. His identity, background and precise floruit remain uncertain.
  • Seán Riabhach Ó Duibhgheannáin
    16th century
    Irish scribe
  • Philip O'Sullivan Beare
    d. 1634 or after
    Irish historian and author, of the O'Sullivans of Beare and Bantry, who lived as an exile in Spain and Portugal, following the Nine Years’ War and the Irish defeat at Kinsale. He wrote a number of Latin treatises on subjects of Irish interest.
  • Hugh Ward
    c.1592–1635
    Irish Franciscan friar, historian and author
  • Peadar Ó Conaill [d. 1826]
    1755–1826
    Irish lexicographer
  • Ruaidhrí Ó Luinín
    fl. 16th century
    Ruaidhrí Ó Luinín, Irish scribe
  • Mícheál mac Peadair Ó Longáin
    c.1693–c.1770
    scribe from Limerick
  • Tuileagna Ó Maoil Chonaire
  • Seán Ó Cléirigh [d. 1846]
    1778–1846
    Seán (or John) Ó Cleirigh, Irish scribe who could probably claim descent from certain illustrious scholars of the Uí Chléirigh, even if his own testimony seems fuzzy and inconsistent. He appears to have had, perhaps inherited, an unknown number of Irish manuscripts written by or associated with Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, five of which he brought to Dublin in 1817.
  • Matha Ó Luinín
    fl. 16th century
    Irish scribe and scholar of Arda on the Erne (Co. Fermanagh)
  • Conchubhar Mhágaodh
    s. xvii
    Irish scribe.
  • Seághan Ó Conuill
    fl. 18th/19th century
    Seághan Ó Conuill / John O'Connell, Irish scribe
  • Authors

    A random selecton of authors and those so described.

  • Mathau Brwmffild
    fl. c.1530–1545
    wandering Welsh poet
  • John Jones [Myrddin Fardd]
    1836–1921
  • Andrew Boorde
    c. 1490–1549
    English physician and author, who embarked on a journey through Europe and wrote a travel treatise The fyrste boke of the introduction of knowledge (completed in 1542). To Celticists, he may be known for his descriptions of Wales and Cornwall, which include some basic lexical information.
  • Bernard de Gordon
    fl. 1270–1330
    French physician, professor of medicine at the University of Montpellier and author of a number of medical treatises. His Lilium medicinae was translated into Irish.
  • Manchán of Lemanaghan
    Manchán mac Silláin, patron saint of Liath Mancháin (Lemanaghan, Co. Offaly)
  • Anonymous [LU scribe H]
    s. xii
    Anonymous scribe, usually known simply as H or the Interpolator, who significantly annotated, revised and interpolated parts of the Lebor na hUidre (RIA MS 23 E 25) and sometimes intercalated leaves to add material. The modern name H stands for ‘Homilist’, which stems from the fact that he added two homilies, Scéla laí brátha and Scéla na hEsérgi. His identity, background and precise floruit remain uncertain.
  • Robert Davies [d. 1835]
    1769–1835
    Welsh poet and grammarian, a native of Nantglyn (Denbighshire).
  • Niocól Ó hÍceadha
    ''fl. c''. 1403
    Niocól Ó hÍceadha, Irish medical scholar who together with Aonghus Ó Callanáin undertook a vernacular translation of a commentary on the ''Aphorisms'' of Hippocrates.
  • Cumméne Ailbe
    ob. 669
    Al. Cumméne Find, seventh abbot of Iona; author of Liber de virtutibus sancti Columbae.
  • Cú Chuimne
    d. 747
    monk and scholar at Iona, called sapiens, who is credited with having co-compiled the Collectio canonum Hibernensis and having authored a Latin hymn in praise of Mary.
  • Senchán Torpéist
    fl. 6th–7th century
    Irish poet associated with Gúaire Aidne, king of Connacht; popular figure in Irish literary tradition, notably as one credited for having retrieved the Táin and, especially in Tromdám Gúaire, as the leader of a band of poets seeking to test the limits of Gúaire’s hospitality.
  • Fíacc of Sletty
    supp. fl. 5th century
    reputed disciple of Saint Patrick, abbot and patron saint of Sléibte (Sletty, Co. Laois).
  • Asser
    d. c.908/909
    monk of St David’s and later, bishop of Sherborne; author of a contemporary Life of King Alfred.
  • John Davies [of Mallwyd]
    d. 1644
    John Davies of Mallwyd, Welsh scholar, author of a Welsh grammar and dictionary
  • William Bottrell
    1816–1881
    Author and collector of Cornish folk-tales, who is best known for three volumes of folk-tale collections (1870, 1873 and 1880).