Acallam na senórach

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Preliminary notes
This overview is a work in progress. Line numbers and incipits are taken from Wh. Stokes’s edition.

Structure

Part I: South of Armagh (Ulster-Midlands)

ll. 1-683. The first section begins on the borders of Cos. Armagh and Louth and proceeds southward, along Mellifont (Drogheda), more or less across Brega and along the Boyne.
Beg.

Ar tabhuirtt chatha Chomuir ⁊ chatha Gabra ⁊ chatha Ollurbha, ⁊ ar n-díthugud na Féindi ...

‘Prologue’ to the Acallam na senórach, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1–57, cf. Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970); tr. Dooley and Roe (1999): 3-4.

Following a series of battles, the Fían, i.e. the fían of Finn mac Cumaill, has been destroyed and its few remaining survivors are dispersed across Ireland. A small remnant from this bygone age survives into the time of St Patrick’s advent in Ireland: aged, weakened and sorrowful, Finn’s son Oisín and Finn’s nephew Caílte still wander about, each with a band of followers. One day, having travelled to the area of Louth, they seek hospitality for the night and find a welcome and lavish reception in the home of Lady Cáma, who used to be Finn’s guardian. Oisín and Caílte part ways. While Oisín goes to visit his mother Blaí at Síd Ochta Cleitig (a síd-mound), Caílte journeys southwards to Ráith Droma Deirc (Ford of the Red Ridge), the site of Finn’s residence.

Following Dooley and Roe (1999), this section of the Acallam may be treated as a prologue in that it occurs before Caílte’s (first) meeting with St Patrick.

Beg.

Is annsin do bhói Pátraic ac cantain na canóine coimdheta

On the first meeting between Patrick and Caílte [part 1], ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 58–104, cf. Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970); tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 5–6.
Beg.

‘Maith’, ar Pátraic, ‘in táinic ár próind ⁊ ár tomhaltus chucaind fós?’

First day of the acallam between Patrick and Caílte (second part), ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 105–164; cf. Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970): Beginning only; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 6–8.

Patrick shares dinner with Caílte and his company and asks him about Finn’s character, the key to their survival, and the drinking vessels of the Fían. Caílte recites a poem in which he reminisces about the drinking horns and other vessels belonging to members of the Fían.

First day of the acallam (third part), incl. the story of Artúir and Bran, Sceolaing and Adnúall, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 164–289; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 8–11. Cf. Aígidecht Artúir (lost). The episode has been discussed by Joseph Falaky Nagy, ‘Arthur and the Irish’ in A companion to Arthurian literature... (2009); Bart Jaski, ‘Early Irish examples of the name ‘Arthur’’, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 56 (2007); and Phillip A. Bernhardt-House, ‘Horses, hounds, and high kings: a shared Arthurian tradition across the Irish Sea?’ in Myth in Celtic literatures... (2007).

Beg.

Ocus do bhátur annsin co táinic maden arnamárach, ⁊ gabais Pátraic a eirredh uime...

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): ll. 290–328; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 11–12. How St Patrick baptised Caílte and spread the faith.

On the second day of the acallam (first part), when on the advice of Patrick's guardian angels, Caílte and his fían are convened and baptised by Patrick.

Beg.

‘Maith, a anum, a Cháilte’, ar Pátraic: ‘gá sealg is ferr fuarudar in Fhiann riamh a n-Eirinn nó a n-Alpain?’

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 329–353, beg. ‘Maith, a anum, a Cháilte’, ar Pátraic: ‘gá sealg is ferr fuarudar in Fhiann riamh a n-Eirinn nó a n-Alpain?’, cf. Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970); tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 12–13. Second day of the acallam (second part): on the hunt on Arran.
Beg.

Is annsin ad-connuic Pátraic dúnad ⁊ degh-árus uaid budhdes gach n-dírech

Second day of the acallam (third part) ... on the fort of Ard Ruide (The fort of the three sons of Lugaid Menn), ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 354–468; cf. Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970); tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 13–16.
Beg.

Ocus nír chian dóibh (ann co) facadar in t-aen-óclách andes gach n-direch dá n-inn(saigid co n-degh-éc)usc

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 469–529; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 16–18. Second day of the acallam (fourth part), incl. the story of Fulartach and Becán.
Beg.

Is and sin ro fhiarfaig Pátraic do Cháilte: ‘ga lín m-bráthar do bhi ac Finn?’

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): Lines 530–610, beg. Is and sin ro fhiarfaig Pátraic do Cháilte: ‘ga lín m-bráthar do bhi ac Finn?’; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 18–20. Second day of the acallam (fifth part). Caílte tells of Finn’s two brothers Fíthal and Cithramach Féinnid and Finn’s incestuously begotten grandson Mag Lugach.
Beg.

Is andsin ro fiarfaig Pátraic do Cháilte: ‘in rabatar airfitigh acuib-se isin Féinn?’

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 611–683; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 20–23. The story of Cnú Deróil and Bláthnait. Summary: second day of the acallam (sixth part). Caílte tells of Finn’s dwarf musician Cnú Deróil, who was exiled from the Túatha Dé Danann out of jealousy for his skills as a musician. It is told in verse how the Fían carried off a woman for him, Bláthnait, a síd-woman of comparable size.

Part II: Munster

ll. 684-1002.
Beg.

Nír' chian dóibh asa h-aithle co facadar in móirseser gilla mór dán-innsaigid

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): ll. 684–717; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 23–24.

Eógan Lethderg, the king of Munster, invites Patrick to Munster. Patrick invites Caílte to accompany him there and departs. Patrick’s itinerary is described in some detail. Eógan Lethderg pays homage to the saint and returns to his court. Patrick performs many miracles in the area.

Beg.

‘Maith a anum, a Cháilte’, ar Pátraic, ‘crét uma tucadh Findtulach ar an tulaig-so ara tám?’

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 718–871 (cf. Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970)); tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 24–28. First day of the acallam in Munster (first part). Caílte and Patrick converse at Finntulach (‘Fair hill’). After explaining the origin of the name of the hill, Caílte goes on to tell of the battle of Finntráig (Ventry) and recount the tragic story of Cáel mac Crimthainn and Créde ingen Cairbri Cnesbháin.

Beg.

Nír' chian dóibh iarsin co facadar in dirim degh-shluaig da n-innsaigid

Concerning the hunt on Cenn Abrat on the first day of the acallam in Munster (second part), ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): ll. c; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 28–30.

Bran mac Deirg, son of the king of Munster, arrives to pay homage to Patrick and to learn the arts of the fían (fiannaigecht) with Caílte. The entire company sets out for Cenn Abrat (Ballyhowra Mountains).

Caílte remembers how the Fían attempted to hunt an elusive stag known as Líath na Trí mBenn.

While Patrick stays at Ardpatrick, a hunt is organised about the Lake of Cows. On refusing to share his bounty with the churchmen, Bran is struck with abdominal pain and Patrick cures him in return for customary tribute. Caílte urges his hunting company to move on and recites a last poem before departure.

Beg.

Ocus imthigid in sluagh cona n-oiribh sealga forro co Cend Abrat Sleibi Cain, conice inadh in longpuirt a m-bidís an Fíand

Episode on the first day of the acallam in Munster, third part, when Caílte helps the wives of the King of Fir Maige's sons by restoring their husbands to them and recovers a treasure, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 946–1002, beg. Ocus imthigid in sluagh cona n-oiribh sealga forro co Cend Abrat Sleibi Cain, conice inadh in longpuirt a m-bidís an Fíand, cf. the edition in Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970); tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 30–32.

Part IIIa. Connacht

ll. 1002-1234.
Beg.

Ocus nír' cian do bhátar ann co bh-fhacatar in móirsheiser da n-innsaigid

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): ll. 1002–1019, beg. Ocus nír' cian do bhátar ann co bh-fhacatar in móirsheiser da n-innsaigid; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 32–33.

Patrick is invited to spread the Gospel in Connacht and goes north, apparently accompanied by Caílte and his retinue. The itinerary is described. A tent is set up near Loch Cróine (Lough Croan, Co. Roscommon), where Muiredach Mór mac Fínnachta, king of Connacht, and the nobles of the province pay homage to him.

Beg.

Dála Pátraic immorro, tainic amach asin pupaill, ⁊ suidis ar an bh-fhirt fótbhaigh

The story of Oscar’s first battle, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1020–1060, beg. Dála Pátraic immorro, tainic amach asin pupaill, ⁊ suidis ar an bh-fhirt fótbhaigh; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 33–34.

Patrick sits on the earthen mound where Oisín’s son Oscar once fought his first battle. Caílte explains that it was fought over Níam, daughter of Áed Donn, king of Ulster. Oscar loved her, but she was promised in marriage to Áed, son of Fidach, king of Connacht. The two rivals met in battle, Oscar with the Fían and Áed with the aid of reinforcements sent to him by Cormac, king of Tara. Áed and Níam’s father were killed in the event, while Oscar was victorious. Broccán, Patrick’s scribe, records the tale in writing.

Beg.

Maith, a anum, a Cháilte’, ar Pátraic, ‘cia in fert-sa ar an tulaig ar a tám?’

The stories of Airnélach and Sálbuide, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): ll. 1064–1092, beg. ‘Maith, a anum, a Cháilte’, ar Pátraic, ‘cia in fert-sa ar an tulaig ar a tám?’; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 34–35.

Having identified the burial mounds of two royal sons of the Fían, Caílte tells the stories of their deaths: Airnélach, who died of shame from the threat of satire, and Sálbuide, who died in pursuit of a fairy deer. Patrick grants Heaven to both of them.

Beg.

Is andsin do fhiarfaig Pátraic do Cháilti: ‘créd ro dithaig sibh uili in bar bh-Fhéinn?’

Story of the battle of Ollarba, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1093–1147; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 35–36, where the poem is translated in part, covering the last six (out of 18) stanzas. Caílte tells that the Fían took ruinous losses from the battles of Gabair and Ollarba. He elaborates on the latter, which was fought against Lugaid Mac Con’s son Fothad. Much of the story comes in the form of a poem attributed to Finn, which has not survived intact in the manuscript. Patrick’s scribe Broccán commits the tale to writing.

Beg.

Is annsin ro fiarfaig Caínen mac Failbhe, meic Ferghusa, meic Eogain Mhoir do Cháilti ...

Lore concerning deaths during and after the reign of Mac Con, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1147–1204; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999).

Various death-tales relating to the Cycles of Lugaid Mac Con (and his son Fothad [Airgthech]), Ailill Ólomm and Fiachu Muillethan are alluded to, all of them in response to questions asked by Cainén mac Failbi, a descendant of Eógan Mór and hence of Ailill Ólomm.

(1) Cainén asks Caílte where Ailill Ólomm, Sadb ingen Chuinn, Ferchis the poet and Ailill’s seven sons died. Caílte enumerates these places, hinting at the circumstances of their deaths.

(2) Caílte also explains to Cainén that Áth Iseal, i.e. Áth Tuisil (‘the Ford of the Fall’), is so named because Fiachu Muillethan, son of Eógan Mór, died here at the hands of Connla Derg.

(3) Cormac Cas, king of Munster, was a son of Ailill Ólomm. He was wounded after the battle of Samain, in which his opponent Eochaid Abratrúad, king of Ulster, perished. Although he sustained a head-wound which caused his brains to leak, he remained king of Munster for another 13 years. He died at Dún Trí Liacc.

Caílte revisits these stories in a poem.

Beg.

Dála Mhuiredhaig mheic Fhinnachta rígh Connacht indister asa h-aithle-sin

Patrick restores Áed mac Muiredaig to life, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1205–1234; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 38. Áed, the young son of the king of Connacht (Muiredach mac Fínnachta), dies suddenly after a game of hurling. His death is deeply mourned. Muiredach and his wife Aífe, daughter of the king of Ulster, go to Patrick, hoping or expecting that he can bring their son back to life. Patrick is moved by Aífe’s grief and that of other mourners with her. By administering three drops of consecrated water to the dead boy’s mouth, he restores him back to life. The people show fealty to Patrick and according to one version, lavish many gifts on him.

Part IIIb: Connacht

ll. 1234-2251.
Beg.

⁊ do bádar annsin re h-edh na h-oidhche-sin co tainic lá cona lan-soillsi

Episode on Ráith Glais and Ráith Almu, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): ll. 1234–1312, beg. ⁊ do bádar annsin re h-edh na h-oidhche-sin co tainic lá cona lan-soillsi; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 38–41.
Beg.

Ocus do bádar annsin re h-edh na h-aidhchi-sin, ⁊ do éirghetar co moch arnamhárach

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): 37–41 (lines 1313–1450), 284–285 (notes) direct link, beg. Ocus do bádar annsin re h-edh na h-aidhchi-sin, ⁊ do éirghetar co moch arnamhárach; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 41–45; discussed by Geraldine Parsons, ‘The structure of Acallam na Senórach’, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 55 (2008): 18–20 and Rory McTurk, ‘Chaucer and the Irish saga tradition’ in Chaucer and the Norse and Celtic worlds... (2005): 70ff.

Patrick, Caílte and Muiredach arrive at Cnoc na Ríg, later Úarán nGarad, where Patrick miraculously causes a well and three streams to spring up. Caílte recounts two interwoven stories, first showing how the Fían was nearly destroyed on Cnoc na Ríg following a game of fidchell.

Beg.

Ocus do éirghetar in slógh rompu do Carnd na h-Airmi

Episode in Carn Fraích (Carnfree, Co. Roscommon), where Caílte informs Patrick about awareness of God among the Fían, with a story concerning the deaths of many royal sons on Cnoc an Áir (‘Hill of Slaughter’), ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): 41–42 (lines 1451–1500), 285 (notes) direct link, beg. Ocus do éirghetar in slógh rompu do Carnd na h-Airmi; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 45–46.
Beg.

Dála Cáilti immorro, ráinic roime budthuaidh co leathan-Magh Luirg in Dagda

Caílte on tour in Connacht (after he has taken leave of Patrick and before he meets Derg Díanscothach), ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1501–1559, beg. Dála Cáilti immorro, ráinic roime budthuaidh co leathan-Magh Luirg in Dagda; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 47–48; discussed by Nollaig Ó Muraíle, ‘Agallamh na seanórach’ in An fhiannaíocht... (1995).

Síd of Ess Rúaid

Beg.

(Ocus do bátar ann re h-edh na h-aidhche-sin, ocus) tángatar rompu arnamhárach tar Es Ruaid Mheic Mhoduirn, ⁊ co Sídh Aedha Esa Ruaid...

Episode concerning the Síd of Ess Rúaid: first part of the story, in which the heroes meet Derg Díanscothach mac Eógain -- incl. the stories of Cuinnscléo and the horse of Díl; ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1559–1621; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 48–50.

Beg.

 As annsin táinicc Derg Dianscothach roime isin sídh anunn d’urfhuigeall Cháilti re h-Ilbreac Easa Ruaid

Second part of the story relating to the Síd of Ess Rúaid, in which Caílte rids the síd of a destructive bird, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): line 1622ff, beg. As annsin táinicc Derg Dianscothach roime isin sídh anunn d’urfhuigeall Cháilti re h-Ilbreac Easa Ruaid; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 50–55.

Derg Díanscothach goes to Ilbrecc (of Assaroe) and Áed Mínbrecc in the síd, tells of Caílte, arranges for them a meeting. Caílte is allowed in and learns of the war between Ilbrecc and Lir of the Síd of Finnachad. Caílte brings down a destructive bird [and later recounts the tale of Finn and Aillén].

Beg.

Is annsin tuc Ilbreac a láim secha suas...

The story of Finn and Aillén, told on the occasion of the ‘spear of Fiacha’ or Birga, ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1654–1771, beg. Is annsin tuc Ilbreac a láim secha suas...; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 51–55.
Beg.

Is annsin ro tócbait a cuirn ⁊ a cupada...

Episode concerning the Síd of Ess Rúaid, fourth part: battle with Lir of the Síd of Finnachad, and the story of Donn and Dub; ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1772–1824, beg. Is annsin ro tócbait a cuirn ⁊ a cupada...; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 55–56.
Beg.

Maith, a anum, a Cháilti’, ar Ilbrec Esa Ruaidh...

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1825–1867, beg. ‘Maith, a anum, a Cháilti’, ar Ilbrec Esa Ruaidh...'; tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 56–57. Síd of Ess Rúaid, part 5: how in Snám Dá Én (near Clonmacnoise), Finn discovered the truth about Conán and Ferdoman and found belief.

Beg.

Táinic roimhe Cáilte in naenbhar óclach sin...

Ed. Whitley Stokes, ‘Acallamh na senórach’ in Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch... (1900): lines 1868–1936, beg. Táinic roimhe Cáilte in naenbhar óclach sin..., cf. Myles Dillon, Stories from the Acallam (1970); tr. Ann Dooley • Harry Roe, Tales of the elders of Ireland (1999): 58–59. On two hospitallers, Eógan Flaithbriugaid and his wife Beccnait, and a monstrous trio: Maelán the giant, his daughter and his bitch; how Caílte kills the latter, but is then weary; it takes six weeks for him to recover.

North Connacht: Tír Chonaill

ll. 1937-2033

Dooley & Roe: 59/60-63. Itinerary up to Doire Guill (Oakwood of Goll) -- The meeting there with Donn son of Áed son of Garad mac Morna -- To explain why Donn’s father, Áed, was killed, Caílte tells him the story of Mac Smáile son of Dub Díthre (largely in verse form) -- Caílte has Áed’s weapons and grants them to Donn -- Donn leads them to the court of his fosterfather Conall mac Néill (a quo Cenél Conaill) -- Donn informs Conall, who tells him to welcome Caílte.

ll. 2034-2084

Episodes set in Tír Chonaill (Co. Donegal). Conall welcomes Caílte and the fían, first meeting him in front of the fort, at the Cairn of Garb Dáire, whose tragic story is told and whose treasure, incl. the chain of Lug, is revealed to be under the cairn. -- Feasting in the hall. -- The cairn is dug up the next morning. Weapons are recovered and given to Conall, while the chain is reserved for Patrick. -- [etc.]

ll. 2085-2197

Caílte identifies the grave of Berrach Brecc and relates her story, which leads to the further discovery of treasure.

ll. 2198-2264

A visit to Tráig Conbice occasions the story of the death of Conbec. -- A hunting trip for the ‘the sow of healing’ (in muc t-shlanga). -- Messengers arrive to invite Conall and Caílte to a meeting with Patrick, Oisín and Díarmait. Caílte, weary, stays behind, but advises Conall and Donn to take some of the uncovered items of treasure with them as gifts.

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Verse items

A lia Bhelaig Atha h-Í (3 qq.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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A Meic Lugach, toluib snas (12 qq.)
attr. to Finn mac CumaillFinn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
Fionn mac Cumhaill;Find úa Báiscni
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle, Finn mac Cumaill, Cormac mac Airt)
Finn mac Cumaill (earlier mac Umaill?), Find úa Báiscni: central hero in medieval Irish and Scottish literature of the so-called Finn Cycle; warrior-hunter and leader of a fían
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A Meic Lugach, toluib snas (13 qq.)
attr. to Finn mac CumaillFinn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
Fionn mac Cumhaill;Find úa Báiscni
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle, Finn mac Cumaill, Cormac mac Airt)
Finn mac Cumaill (earlier mac Umaill?), Find úa Báiscni: central hero in medieval Irish and Scottish literature of the so-called Finn Cycle; warrior-hunter and leader of a fían
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A mna áilli Fénne Finn (34 qq.)
attr. to Garad mac MornaGarad mac Morna
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
No short description available
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A thobuir Trágha Dhá Bhan (7 qq.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Ac súd duit-si an t-ech dub dian (2 qq.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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An fert fuil fan líg Lodain (1 q.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Atá isin chinn-sa thes (1 q.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Cuinnscleo gilla, mac Annscleo (2 qq.)
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Cuirnn ro bhátar a tigh Fhind (15 qq.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Cumhain leam-sa trí tulcha (5 qq.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Dá chornn déc ocus trí cét (1 q.)
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Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Dámadh ór in duille donn (1 q.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Diamair ar senchaidi sund (1 q.)
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Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Each dubh ac Dil Mac Dá Creac (1 q.)
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Inmain ceall (bus comra)mach (1 q.)
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Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Trí cét bó is trí cét brat (1 q.)
attr. to Caílte mac RónáinCaílte mac Rónáin
Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Uathad selga sin a Dheirg (3 qq.)
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Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle)
or Caílte mac Crundchon meic Rónáin, kinsman of Finn mac Cumaill and a prominent member of his fían; accomplished warrior and hunter; one of the protagonists of Acallam na senórach
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Derg Díanscothach mac EógainDerg Díanscothach mac Eógain
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Textual items for Acallam na senórach 128



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Primary sources (Acallam na senórach)
[ed.] [tr.] Stokes, Whitley [ed. and tr.], “Acallamh na senórach”, in: Ernst Windisch, and Whitley Stokes, Irische Texte mit Wörterbuch, 4 vols, vol. 4, Leipzig, 1900. 1–438, ix–xiv.
Celtic Digital Initiative: <link> CELT – corrected edition (without Stokes’ notes): <link> Internet Archive: <link>
Edition, with translation of the parts left untranslated by O'Grady.
[ed.] OʼGrady, Standish Hayes, Silva Gadelica (I–XXXI): a collection of tales in Irish, vol. 1: Irish text, London: Williams & Norgate, 1892.
Digitale-sammlungen.de: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive – originally from Google Books: <link>, <link> CELT – various: <link>, <link>, <link>, <link>, <link>, <link>
94–233 Edition, from the Book of Lismore version.
[tr.] OʼGrady, Standish Hayes, Silva Gadelica (I–XXXI): a collection of tales in Irish, vol. 2: translation and notes, London: Williams & Norgate, 1892.
Digitale-sammlungen.de: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
101–265 Translation.
[ed.] Dillon, Myles [ed.], Stories from the Acallam, Mediaeval and Modern Irish Series, 23, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1970.
Six stories, corresponding to lines 1-120, 329-353, 354-468, 718-871, 949-1002 and 1868-1934 of Stokes' edition.
[tr.] Dooley, Ann, and Harry Roe [trs.], Tales of the elders of Ireland, Oxford's World Classics, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
The first translation into English of the whole text.
[tr.] Harmon, Maurice, The dialogue of the ancients of Ireland: a new translation of Acallam na senórach, Dublin: Carysfort Press, 2009.  
Preface by Seán Ó Coileáin.
A free, literary translation that is not intended for scholarly purposes.
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
Page created
June 2014, last updated: June 2022