Bibliography

T. M. (Thomas Mowbray)
Charles-Edwards
s. xx / s. xxi

161 publications between 1970 and 2021 indexed
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Works authored

Charles-Edwards, T. M., Wales and the Britons, 350–1064, History of Wales, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. 816 pp.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., St Patrick and the landscape of early Christian Ireland, Kathleen Hughes Memorial Lectures, 10, Cambridge: ASNC, 2011.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., The Chronicle of Ireland: translated with an introduction and notes, 2 vols, Translated Texts for Historians, 44, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2006.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Early Christian Ireland, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., The medieval Gaelic lawyer, Quiggin Pamphlets on the Sources of Mediaeval Gaelic History, 4, Cambridge, 1999. ii + 73 pp.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Early Irish and Welsh kinship, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., The Welsh laws, Writers of Wales, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1989.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Fergus Kelly, Bechbretha: an Old Irish law-tract on bee-keeping, Early Irish Law Series, 1, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1983.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Two medieval Welsh poems: Stori Gwenfrewi a'i Ffynnon ‘The story of Gwenfrewi and her well’ and Fynnon Wenfrewy ‘St Winefride's Well’, Llandysul: Gomer Press, 1971.

Works edited

Charles-Edwards, T. M., and R. J. W. Evans (eds), Wales and the wider world: Welsh history in an international context, Donington: Shaun Tyas, 2010.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, Cymdeithas Hanes Cyfraith Cymru, 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007.
Charles-Edwards, T. M. (ed.), After Rome, The Short Oxford History of the British Isles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Paul Russell, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000.
Owen, Morfydd E., T. M. Charles-Edwards, and D. B. Walters (eds), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986.

Contributions to journals

Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Jacopo Bisagni’s Amrae Coluimb Chille”, Peritia 32 (2021): 263–289.  
abstract:

Almost all the fundamental facts about the Amrae, the most intriguing and the most difficult of early Irish texts on Columba of Iona, are disputed: its date, its authorship, whether it is a poem or prose, for what audience or readership it was intended, and even the meaning of the title. Hitherto, discussion has been hampered by the absence of a reliable critical edition, one that takes into account all the surviving copies and situates them in the manuscript tradition of the text. This task has been admirably performed by Bisagni. His edition includes a book-length introduction which advocates an early ninth-century date for the main text of the Amrae, locates its composition at the Columban monastery of Durrow, and interprets it as a response by the Columban familia to the threat posed to its interests by the church of Armagh in a period when Áed Oirdnide of Cenél nÉogain reigned as king of Tara. Bisagni’s arguments are considered in the light of the text he has provided.

abstract:

Almost all the fundamental facts about the Amrae, the most intriguing and the most difficult of early Irish texts on Columba of Iona, are disputed: its date, its authorship, whether it is a poem or prose, for what audience or readership it was intended, and even the meaning of the title. Hitherto, discussion has been hampered by the absence of a reliable critical edition, one that takes into account all the surviving copies and situates them in the manuscript tradition of the text. This task has been admirably performed by Bisagni. His edition includes a book-length introduction which advocates an early ninth-century date for the main text of the Amrae, locates its composition at the Columban monastery of Durrow, and interprets it as a response by the Columban familia to the threat posed to its interests by the church of Armagh in a period when Áed Oirdnide of Cenél nÉogain reigned as king of Tara. Bisagni’s arguments are considered in the light of the text he has provided.

Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Early Irish law, St Patrick, and the date of the Senchas Már”, Ériu 71 (2021): 19–59.  
abstract:

Liam Breatnach’s Quiggin Lecture, The Early Irish law text Senchas Már and the question of its date, proposed that the Senchas Már was written in a single effort mounted by the church of Armagh within the date range c. 660 × c. 680. This revised and expanded version of a lecture given in 2017 accepts that there was a link between Armagh and the Senchas Már, sets the latter in the context of the written laws of Western Europe, 400–800, and investigates how the Senchas Már might have fitted into the sequence of seventh-century texts pertaining to Patrick. It also tackles two related issues: the relationship between evolving ideas of Irish nationality, the Patrician legend and the Senchas Már, and how one might bridge the gap between the Patrick of the saint’s own writings and conceptions of Patrick current in the seventh century.

abstract:

Liam Breatnach’s Quiggin Lecture, The Early Irish law text Senchas Már and the question of its date, proposed that the Senchas Már was written in a single effort mounted by the church of Armagh within the date range c. 660 × c. 680. This revised and expanded version of a lecture given in 2017 accepts that there was a link between Armagh and the Senchas Már, sets the latter in the context of the written laws of Western Europe, 400–800, and investigates how the Senchas Már might have fitted into the sequence of seventh-century texts pertaining to Patrick. It also tackles two related issues: the relationship between evolving ideas of Irish nationality, the Patrician legend and the Senchas Már, and how one might bridge the gap between the Patrick of the saint’s own writings and conceptions of Patrick current in the seventh century.

Charles-Edwards, T. M., “John Rhys and the Jesus Chair of Celtic at Oxford”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 77 (2019): 33–45.
Bemmer, Jaqueline, and T. M. Charles-Edwards, “Irish and Welsh law in the European contexts”, Clio@Themis 10 (2016). URL: <http://www.cliothemis.com/Irish-and-Welsh-Law-in-the>. 
abstract:
This paper traces the relationship of the Roman Empire with Ireland and Wales from roughly the fifth to the seventh centuries and probes the role that Roman and Canon law played there following the events of 410, based on evidence from authors, such as Prosper of Aquitaine, Venantius Fortunatus, Zosimus and Gildas, as well as the vernacular legal traditions. This approach allows us to investigate perceptions of legal identity in Post-Roman Britain and the echoes of Latin learning embraced in Ireland.
abstract:
This paper traces the relationship of the Roman Empire with Ireland and Wales from roughly the fifth to the seventh centuries and probes the role that Roman and Canon law played there following the events of 410, based on evidence from authors, such as Prosper of Aquitaine, Venantius Fortunatus, Zosimus and Gildas, as well as the vernacular legal traditions. This approach allows us to investigate perceptions of legal identity in Post-Roman Britain and the echoes of Latin learning embraced in Ireland.
T. M. Charles-Edwards, “[Review of: Patrick Sims-Williams, Irish Influence on medieval Welsh literature (2010)]”, in: Medium Ævum 81 (2012): 324.
T. M. Charles-Edwards, “[Review of: Daniel P. Mc Carthy, The Irish annals: their genesis, evolution and history (2008)]”, in: Uáitéar Mac Gearailt (ed.) • James Kelly (ed.), Studia Hibernica 36 (2009–2010): 207–210.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Saints’ cults and the early Irish church”, Clogher Record 19:2–3 (2007): 173–184.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Historical context and literary meaning: another reading of Scéla muicce Meic Da Thó”, Journal of Celtic Studies 5 (2005): 1–16.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Early Irish saints’ cults and their constituencies”, Ériu 54 (2004): 79–102.  
abstract:

This article explores the differences between early Irish saints' cults, concentrating mainly but not exclusively on those associated with the Fothairt. It begins with a simple and local cult, that of Damnat of Tedavnet, and a complex and widespread cult, that of Brigit. It is argued that Brigit's cult had at least four constituencies: the Fothairt, Kildare, Leinster, and the weak throughout Ireland and even in Britain. Brigit's cult among the Fothairt is then contrasted with that of another Fothairt saint, Fintan of Clonenagh; and Fintan's cult, in turn, is contrasted with that of Rígnach. The Uí Ercáin, a branch of the Fothairt, illustrate how the political status of a cult's constituency may determine its character. Finally, the shift from an alliance between cults to competition is studied in the example of Cainnech and Columba.

abstract:

This article explores the differences between early Irish saints' cults, concentrating mainly but not exclusively on those associated with the Fothairt. It begins with a simple and local cult, that of Damnat of Tedavnet, and a complex and widespread cult, that of Brigit. It is argued that Brigit's cult had at least four constituencies: the Fothairt, Kildare, Leinster, and the weak throughout Ireland and even in Britain. Brigit's cult among the Fothairt is then contrasted with that of another Fothairt saint, Fintan of Clonenagh; and Fintan's cult, in turn, is contrasted with that of Rígnach. The Uí Ercáin, a branch of the Fothairt, illustrate how the political status of a cult's constituency may determine its character. Finally, the shift from an alliance between cults to competition is studied in the example of Cainnech and Columba.

Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Dliged: its native and latinate usages”, Celtica 24 (2003): 65–78.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Ireland and its invaders, 1166–1186”, Quaestio Insularis 4 (2003): 1–34.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “The Uí Néill 695–743: the rise and fall of dynasties”, Peritia 16 (2002): 396–418.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Geis, prophecy, omen, and oath”, Celtica 23 (1999): 38–59.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The construction of the Hibernensis”, Peritia 12 (1998): 209–237.  
abstract:
This study uses a single main tool, comparison of the collection of ‘contrary cases’ at the end of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis (book 67 in the A recension) with corresponding material in books 21–29. It has two main purposes, to reveal something of the way in which the compilers worked and to help towards resolving the issue of which recension was the earlier.
abstract:
This study uses a single main tool, comparison of the collection of ‘contrary cases’ at the end of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis (book 67 in the A recension) with corresponding material in books 21–29. It has two main purposes, to reveal something of the way in which the compilers worked and to help towards resolving the issue of which recension was the earlier.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “A contract between king and people in early medieval Ireland? Críth gablach on kingship”, Peritia 8 (1994): 107–119.  
abstract:

The early eighth-century Irish legal tract, Críth Gablach (a text on status), ends with a discussion of kingship. It is particularly interesting for its perception of the relationship between a king and his people as a contract. It is argued that the background to this view is to be found within Ireland, especially in the relationship between client kings and their overlords and between the church and the laity. Críth Gablach’s account of kingship also includes a section on the proper arrangement of the king’s household. Some elements of this section are clearly artificial, but they can be explained in terms of a desire on the part of the author to include a christian interpretation of kingship.

abstract:

The early eighth-century Irish legal tract, Críth Gablach (a text on status), ends with a discussion of kingship. It is particularly interesting for its perception of the relationship between a king and his people as a contract. It is argued that the background to this view is to be found within Ireland, especially in the relationship between client kings and their overlords and between the church and the laity. Críth Gablach’s account of kingship also includes a section on the proper arrangement of the king’s household. Some elements of this section are clearly artificial, but they can be explained in terms of a desire on the part of the author to include a christian interpretation of kingship.

Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The new edition of Adomnán’s Life of Columba”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 26 (Winter, 1993): 65–73.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Críth Gablach and the law of status”, Peritia 5 (1986): 53–73.  
abstract:
This paper presents a detailed study of the determinants of social status as set out in Críth Gablach (c. AD 700), an Irish law tract on social classification which attempts a systematic analysis of the status of the free and noble classes (excluding the church and the professions) in early medieval Irish society. The nature and determinants of status are considered and the ranks of society set out in detail. To be a noble was to be hereditarily a lord of freemen in clientship – lordship rather than actual income ennobled, though other factors were relevant. For the non-noble freeman, a house, land and material assets are the basis of status. Lordship, however, appears to be economically central to the condition of the non-noble grades. Críth Gablach is one of the few outstanding pieces of social analysis from early medieval Europe.
abstract:
This paper presents a detailed study of the determinants of social status as set out in Críth Gablach (c. AD 700), an Irish law tract on social classification which attempts a systematic analysis of the status of the free and noble classes (excluding the church and the professions) in early medieval Irish society. The nature and determinants of status are considered and the ranks of society set out in detail. To be a noble was to be hereditarily a lord of freemen in clientship – lordship rather than actual income ennobled, though other factors were relevant. For the non-noble freeman, a house, land and material assets are the basis of status. Lordship, however, appears to be economically central to the condition of the non-noble grades. Críth Gablach is one of the few outstanding pieces of social analysis from early medieval Europe.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Bede, the Irish and the Britons”, Celtica 15 (1983): 42–52.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Honour and status in some Irish and Welsh prose tales”, Ériu 29 (1978): 123–141.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The social background of Irish peregrinatio”, Celtica 11 (1976): 43–59.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The seven bishop-houses of Dyfed”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 24:3 (1971, 1970–1972): 247–262.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Kinship, status and the origins of the hide”, Past & Present 56 (1972): 3–33.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The heir-apparent in Irish and Welsh law”, Celtica 9 (1971): 180–190.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The date of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi”, Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion 1970–1972 (1971): 263–298.
Welsh Journals Online: <link>
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Varia IV: Wb. 28c14 and the ‘exclusive’ use of the equative in Old Irish”, Ériu 22 (1971): 188–189.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Edryd, edryf, edfryd, edrydd”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:2 (1969, 1968–1970): 117–120.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and N. J. A. Williams, “The etymologies of diffoddi and differaf / diffryt”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:3 (1969, 1968–1970): 213–217.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Welsh diffoddi, difa and Irish do-badi and do-ba”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:3 (1969, 1968–1970): 210–213.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Perceptions of pagan and Christian: from Patrick to Gregory the Great”, in: Roy Flechner, and Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (eds), The introduction of Christianity into the early medieval Insular world: converting the Isles I, 19, Turnhout: Brepols, 2016. 259–278.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Welsh bardic grammars on litterae”, in: Deborah Hayden, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. 149–160.  
abstract:
The first part of this chapter considers the relatively straightforward relationship between the section on letters in Gramadegau Penceirddiaid (GP), the Welsh vernacular grammars, and the section on Litterae in Donatus’s Ars Maior. It then goes on to consider the more problematic case of how the voiced dental fricative /ð/, now written in Welsh with a double dd, was spelt in the different versions of GP. In particular the adoption of the Latin abbreviation for que as a spelling for /ð/ in the Peniarth 20 version is considered in the context of the development of consistent orthographies in late Middle Welsh.
abstract:
The first part of this chapter considers the relatively straightforward relationship between the section on letters in Gramadegau Penceirddiaid (GP), the Welsh vernacular grammars, and the section on Litterae in Donatus’s Ars Maior. It then goes on to consider the more problematic case of how the voiced dental fricative /ð/, now written in Welsh with a double dd, was spelt in the different versions of GP. In particular the adoption of the Latin abbreviation for que as a spelling for /ð/ in the Peniarth 20 version is considered in the context of the development of consistent orthographies in late Middle Welsh.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Táin bó Cuailnge, hagiography and history”, in: John Carey, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 86–102.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The manuscript transmission of Bretha comaithchesa”, in: Elizabeth Boyle, and Deborah Hayden (eds), Authorities and adaptations: the reworking and transmission of textual sources in medieval Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2014. 95–120.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Some thoughts on early Irish roads and travel”, in: Liam Mac Amhlaigh, and Brian Ó Curnáin (eds), Ilteangach, ilseiftiúil: féilscríbhinn in ómós do Nicholas Williams = A festschrift in honour of Nicholas Williams, Dublin: Arlen House, 2012. 71–95.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Dynastic succession in early medieval Wales”, in: Ralph A. Griffiths, and Phillipp R. Schofield (eds), Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages: essays presented to J. Beverley Smith, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011. 70–88.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Whitley Stokes and early Irish law”, in: Elizabeth Boyle, and Paul Russell (eds), The tripartite life of Whitley Stokes (1830-1909), Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011. 161–174.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The structure and purpose of Adomnán’s Vita Columbae”, in: Rodney Aist, Thomas Owen Clancy, Thomas OʼLoughlin, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds), Adomnán of Iona: theologian, lawmaker, peacemaker, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010. 205–218.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The date of Culhwch ac Olwen”, in: Wilson McLeod, Abigail Burnyeat, Domhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart, Thomas Owen Clancy, and Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh (eds), Bile ós chrannaibh: a Festschrift for William Gillies, Tigh a' Mhaide, Brig o' Turk, Perthshire: Clann Tuirc, 2010. 45–56.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Celtic kings: ‘priestly vegetables’?”, in: Stephen Baxter, Catherine E. Karkov, Janet L. Nelson, and David A. E. Pelteret (eds), Early medieval studies in memory of Patrick Wormald, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009. 65–80.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas M., “Social structure”, in: Pauline Stafford (ed.), A companion to the early Middle Ages: Britain and Ireland c. 500–1100, Oxford, Malden, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. 107–125.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Galanas tractate in Iorwerth: texts and the legal development”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards, and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007. 92–107.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Welsh law of theft: Iorwerth versus the rest”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards, and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007. 108–130.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The three columns: a comparative perspective”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards, and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007. 26–59.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “[Texts:] Iorwerth manuscript E (and B)”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards, and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007. 258–307.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Middle Welsh mae ‘is’”, in: Bernadette Smelik, Rijcklof Hofman, Camiel Hamans, and David Cram (eds), A companion in linguistics: a Festschrift for Anders Ahlqvist on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2005. 161–170.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Early Irish law”, in: Dáibhí Ó Cróinín (ed.), A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 331–337.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Iarlaithe (supp. d. 481)”, Oxford dictionary of national biography, Online: Oxford University Press, 2004–. URL: <http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/14664>.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “[Multiple contributions]”, Oxford dictionary of national biography, Online: Oxford University Press, 2004–2011. URL: <http://www.oxforddnb.com>.
includes: T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Áed Allán mac Fergaile (d. 743)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Áed Oirdnide mac Néill (d. 819)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Áed Uaridnach mac Domnaill (d. 612)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Blaímac mac Áeda [Blathmac] (d. 665)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Brigit (439/452–524/526)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Brochfael Ysgithrog (supp. fl. 6th cent.)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Brynach (fl. 6th cent.)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cadfan [St Cadfan] (supp. fl. 6th cent.)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cadog (fl. 6th cent.)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cadwallon ap Cadfan (d. 634)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cellach mac Máele Coba (d. 658)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cenn Fáelad mac Blaímaic (d. 675)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cináed mac Írgalaig (d. 728)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Congal Cáech (d. 637)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cybi (fl. 6th cent.)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cyfeilliog (d. 927)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Cynidr (fl. 6th cent.)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Dallán Forgaill (fl. 597)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Deiniol (d. 584)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Diarmait mac Cerbaill (d. 565)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Dogfael (fl. 6th cent.)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Domnall mac Áeda (d. 642)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Domnall mac Murchada (d. 763)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Dubthach maccu Lugair (supp. fl. 432)’ • T. M. Charles-Edwards, ‘Elfoddw (d. 809)
FURTHER RESULTS…
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Gorsedd, dadl, and llys: assemblies and courts in medieval Wales”, in: Aliki Pantos, and Sarah Semple (eds), Assembly places and practices in medieval Europe, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2004. 95–108.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Conversion to Christianity”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards (ed.), After Rome, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 103–139.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Conclusion”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards (ed.), After Rome, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 259–270.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Northern Lectionary: a source for the Codex Salmanticensis?”, in: Jane Cartwright (ed.), Celtic hagiography and saints’ cults, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003. 148–160.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Introduction”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards (ed.), After Rome, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 1–20.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Nations and kingdoms: a view from above”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards (ed.), After Rome, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 23–58.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Érlam: the patron-saint of an Irish church”, in: Alan Thacker, and Richard Sharpe (eds), Local saints and local churches in the early medieval West, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 267–290.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Tochmarc Étaíne: a literal interpretation”, in: Michael Richter, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 165–181.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Wales and Mercia, 613-918”, in: Michelle P. Brown, and Carol Ann Farr (eds), Mercia. an Anglo-Saxon kingdom in Europe, London, New York: Leicester University Press, 2001. 88–105.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The textual tradition of medieval Welsh prose tales and the problem of dating”, in: Bernhard Maier, Stefan Zimmer, and Christiane Batke (eds), 150 Jahre ‘Mabinogion’ – deutsch-walisische Kulturbeziehungen, 19, Tübingen: Niemeyer, 2001. 23–40.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Food, drink and clothing in the Laws of Court”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards, Paul Russell, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 319–337.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “‘The continuation of Bede’, s.a. 750: high-kings, kings of Tara and ‘Bretwaldas’”, in: Alfred P. Smyth (ed.), Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 137–145.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Nerys Ann Jones, “Breintiau gwŷr Powys: The liberties of the men of Powys”, in: T. M. Charles-Edwards, Paul Russell, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 191–223.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Britons in Ireland, c. 550-800”, in: John Carey, John T. Koch, and Pierre-Yves Lambert (eds), Ildánach Ildírech. A festschrift for Proinsias Mac Cana, 4, Andover and Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 1999. 15–26.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The context and uses of literacy in early Christian Ireland”, in: Huw Pryce (ed.), Literacy in medieval Celtic societies, 33, Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1998. 62–82.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The penitential of Columbanus”, in: Michael Lapidge (ed.), Columbanus: studies on the Latin writings, 17, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1997. 217–239.
T. M. Charles-Edwards, “The date of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi”, in: C. W. Sullivan III (ed.), The Mabinogi: a book of essays (1996): 19–58.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Mi a dynghaf dynghed and related problems”, in: Joseph F. Eska, R. Geraint Gruffydd, and Nicolas Jacobs (eds), Hispano-Gallo-Brittonica: essays in honour of professor D. Ellis Evans on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1995. 1–15.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Language and society among the Insular Celts, AD 400—1000”, in: Miranda J. Green (ed.), The Celtic world, London, New York: Routledge, 1995. 703–736.
Charles-Edwards, Gifford, and T. M. Charles-Edwards, “The continuation of Brut y tywysogion in Peniarth MS. 20”, in: Tegwyn Jones, and E. B. Fryde (eds), Ysgrifau a cherddi cyflwynedig i Daniel Huws: Essays and poems presented to Daniel Huws, Aberystwyth: National Library of Wales, 1994. 293–305.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Palladius, Prosper, and Leo the Great: mission and primatial authority”, in: David N. Dumville, and Lesley Abrams (eds), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, 13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 1–12.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Arthur of history”, in: Rachel Bromwich, A. O. H. Jarman, and Brynley F. Roberts (eds), The Arthur of the Welsh. The Arthurian legend in medieval Welsh literature, 1, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1991. 15–32.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Early medieval kingships in the British Isles”, in: Steven Bassett (ed.), The origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1989. 28–39, 245–248.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The texts: i. Introduction”, in: Morfydd E. Owen, T. M. Charles-Edwards, and D. B. Walters (eds), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986. 111–116.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The texts: iii. The ‘Iorwerth’ text”, in: Morfydd E. Owen, T. M. Charles-Edwards, and D. B. Walters (eds), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986. 137–178.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Church and settlement”, in: Próinséas Ní Chatháin, and Michael Richter (eds), Irland und Europa: die Kirche im Frühmittelalter / Ireland and Europe: the early church, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1984. 167–175.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Nau kynywedi teithiauc”, in: Dafydd Jenkins, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh Law of Women, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1980. 23–39.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The ‘Iorwerth’ text”, in: Dafydd Jenkins, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh Law of Women, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1980. 161–185.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The authenticity of the Gododdin: an historian’s view”, in: Rachel Bromwich, and R. Brinley Jones (eds), Astudiaethau ar yr hengerdd / Studies in old Welsh poetry: cyflwynedig i Syr Idris Foster, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1978. 44–71.

As honouree

Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History, 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011.

As honouree

Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History, 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011..

About the author

ap Huw, Maredudd, “Bibliography of the writings of Thomas Charles-Edwards”, in: Fiona Edmonds, and Paul Russell (eds), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011. 217–224..