Bibliography

Brynley F. (Brynley Francis)
Roberts
s. xx / s. xxi

47 publications between 1960 and 2019 indexed
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Works authored

Evans, Dewi Wyn, and Brynley F. Roberts (eds.), Edward Lhuyd: Archæologia Britannica. Texts and translations, Celtic Studies Publications 10, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2007.
Roberts, Brynley F. [ed.], Breudwyt Maxen Wledic, Mediaeval and Modern Welsh Series 11, Dublin: DIAS, 2005.
Roberts, Brynley F., Gerald of Wales, Writers of Wales, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1982.
Roberts, Brynley F., Edward Lhuyd: the making of a scientist [G. J. Williams memorial lecture, 16 February, 1979], Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1980. 21 pp.
Roberts, Brynley F. [ed.], Cyfranc Lludd a Llefelys, Mediaeval and Modern Welsh Series 7, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1975.
Roberts, Brynley F. [ed.], Brut y Brenhinedd: Llanstephan MS. 1 version, Mediaeval and Modern Welsh Series 5, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1971.

Works edited

Owen, Morfydd E., and Brynley F. Roberts (eds), Beirdd a thywysogion: barddoniaeth llys yng Nghymru, Iwerddon a’r Alban: cyflwynedig i R. Geraint Gruffydd, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1996.
Bromwich, Rachel, A. O. H. Jarman, and Brynley F. Roberts (eds.), The Arthur of the Welsh. The Arthurian legend in medieval Welsh literature, Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages 1, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1991.
Roberts, Brynley F. (ed.), Early Welsh poetry: studies in the Book of Aneirin, Aberystwyth: National Library of Wales, 1988. 212 pp.  
A collection of essays that were previously presented at a conference held in 1984.
A collection of essays that were previously presented at a conference held in 1984.

Contributions to journals

Roberts, Brynley F., “Edward Lhwyd in Cornwall”, Studia Celtica 53 (2019): 133–152.  
abstract:

This article discusses Edward Lhwyd's visit to Cornwall in 1700, drawing on his correspondence to demonstrate the support he received from Cornish scholars and antiquarians, his itinerary and fieldwork methodology, his treatment of the Cornish language, and the manuscript materials available to him.

abstract:

This article discusses Edward Lhwyd's visit to Cornwall in 1700, drawing on his correspondence to demonstrate the support he received from Cornish scholars and antiquarians, his itinerary and fieldwork methodology, his treatment of the Cornish language, and the manuscript materials available to him.

Roberts, Brynley F., “An early Edward Lhwyd glossary”, Studia Celtica 50 (2016): 151–162.
Roberts, Brynley F., “‘Tanbeidrwydd sêl ac ynni eisteddfodol’: ysgolion barddol Aberdâr”, National Library of Wales Journal 36:2 (2015): 159–182.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Glosau Cymraeg Historia regum Britanniae Dulyn, Coleg y Drindod, llsgr. 515 (E.5.12)”, Studia Celtica 37 (2003): 75–80.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Peredur son of Efrawg: a text in transition”, Arthuriana 10:3 (Fall, 2000): 57–72.
Roberts, Brynley F., “The discovery of Old Welsh”, Historiographia Linguistica 26:1-2 (Jan., 1999): 1–21.  
abstract:

Edward Lhuyd's (1660-1709) Archaeologia Britannica (Oxford 1707), was intended to be a study of early British history together with copies of some of the original source material. The only volume to appear, entitled Glossography, printed glossaries and grammars of the Celtic languages and lists of Irish and Welsh manuscripts, and it set out the principles of phonetic changes and correspondences so that linguistic and written evidence for the relationships of the first (Celtic) inhabitants of the British Isles could be evaluated. The antiquity of the evidence was of prime importance. Lhuyd sought the 'very ancient' written sources which would bridge the gap between the post-Roman inscriptions and the medieval Welsh manuscripts which he had seen. Humphrey Wanley (1672-1726), the Old English scholar, drew his attention to the Lichfield gospel book and two Latin manuscripts at the Bodleian Library which contained Welsh glosses and Lhuyd himself discovered the Cambridge Juvencus manuscript. These were the oldest forms of Welsh which he had seen. He analysed the palaeography, the orthography and vocabulary of these witnesses, and although he was not able fully to comprehend these records, he was able to begin to describe the characteristics of the British insular hand and to define some of the features which distinguished Old Welsh from Middle Welsh.

abstract:

Edward Lhuyd's (1660-1709) Archaeologia Britannica (Oxford 1707), was intended to be a study of early British history together with copies of some of the original source material. The only volume to appear, entitled Glossography, printed glossaries and grammars of the Celtic languages and lists of Irish and Welsh manuscripts, and it set out the principles of phonetic changes and correspondences so that linguistic and written evidence for the relationships of the first (Celtic) inhabitants of the British Isles could be evaluated. The antiquity of the evidence was of prime importance. Lhuyd sought the 'very ancient' written sources which would bridge the gap between the post-Roman inscriptions and the medieval Welsh manuscripts which he had seen. Humphrey Wanley (1672-1726), the Old English scholar, drew his attention to the Lichfield gospel book and two Latin manuscripts at the Bodleian Library which contained Welsh glosses and Lhuyd himself discovered the Cambridge Juvencus manuscript. These were the oldest forms of Welsh which he had seen. He analysed the palaeography, the orthography and vocabulary of these witnesses, and although he was not able fully to comprehend these records, he was able to begin to describe the characteristics of the British insular hand and to define some of the features which distinguished Old Welsh from Middle Welsh.

Roberts, Brynley F., “Translating Old Welsh: the first attempts”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 760–777.
Roberts, Brynley F., “A bibliography of the published work of Thomas Jones”, Studia Celtica 10–11 (1975–1976): 5–14.
Roberts, Brynley F., “A note on the Ashmolean collections of letters addressed to Edward Lhuyd”, Welsh History Review 7:2 (December 1974, 1974–1975): 179–185.
Journal volume:  Journals.library.wales: <link>
Roberts, Brynley F., “bwyall enilleg”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:2 (1969, 1968–1970): 121–122.
Roberts, Brynley F., “[Nodiadau amryfal] Penyd Rhiannon”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:4 (1970, 1968–1970): 325–327.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Un o lawysgrifau Hopcyn ap Tomas o Ynys Dawy”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 22:3 (1967, 1966–1968): 223–228.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Ystori’r llong foel”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 18:4 (1960): 337–362.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Roberts, Brynley F., “A web of Welsh Bruts”, in: Tétrel, Hélène, and Géraldine Veysseyre (eds), L’Historia regum Britannie et les «Bruts» en Europe, 2: Production, circulation et réception, XIIe-XVIe siècle, Rencontres 349, Paris: Classiques Garnier, 2018. 147–168.  
abstract:

Brynley Roberts analyses the texts of 9 Welsh versions or redactions of HRB ranging from the early 13th c. to the 16th c. Many of these are amalgams and most appear to have been associated in some way with the Cistercian abbey of Valle Crucis in N.-E. Wales. The texts represent a creative response to HRB in changing social and political circumstances over a long period in a particular area of Wales.

Brynley Roberts analyse le contenu de neuf traductions galloises de l’Historia Regum Britannie qui ont été composées entre le début du XIIIe et le xvie siècle. Nombre de ces « Bruts », émaillés de lectiones communes, sont à mettre en relation avec l’abbaye cistercienne de Valle Crucis (N.-E. du Pays-de-Galles). Ils attestent les réactions créatives suscitées par l’Historia au cours de plusieurs siècles de changements sociaux et politiques dans cette région.

abstract:

Brynley Roberts analyses the texts of 9 Welsh versions or redactions of HRB ranging from the early 13th c. to the 16th c. Many of these are amalgams and most appear to have been associated in some way with the Cistercian abbey of Valle Crucis in N.-E. Wales. The texts represent a creative response to HRB in changing social and political circumstances over a long period in a particular area of Wales.

Brynley Roberts analyse le contenu de neuf traductions galloises de l’Historia Regum Britannie qui ont été composées entre le début du XIIIe et le xvie siècle. Nombre de ces « Bruts », émaillés de lectiones communes, sont à mettre en relation avec l’abbaye cistercienne de Valle Crucis (N.-E. du Pays-de-Galles). Ils attestent les réactions créatives suscitées par l’Historia au cours de plusieurs siècles de changements sociaux et politiques dans cette région.

Lloyd-Morgan, Ceridwen, and Brynley F. Roberts, “Annexe: Répertoire de manuscrits de Brut y brenhinedd”, in: Tétrel, Hélène, and Géraldine Veysseyre (eds), L’Historia regum Britannie et les «Bruts» en Europe, 2: Production, circulation et réception, XIIe-XVIe siècle, Rencontres 349, Paris: Classiques Garnier, 2018. 493–499.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Brut y brenhinedd, MS. National Library of Wales, Llanstephan 1 version”, in: Tétrel, Hélène, and Géraldine Veysseyre (eds), L’Historia regum Britannie et les «Bruts» en Europe, 1: Traductions, adaptations, réappropriations: XIIe-XVIe siècle, Rencontres 106, Paris: Classiques Garnier, 2015. 71–80.  
abstract:

B. Roberts describes one of the three older versions of the Welsh Brut y Brenhinedd, found, among others, in the Llanstephan I manuscript (13th c.). In this version, the Lludd and Llevelys tale has been inserted. Its environment, the abbey of Valle Crucis, can be seen to have a measurable impact.

B. Roberts décrit l’une des trois versions anciennes du Brut y Brenhinedd gallois, conservée entre autres dans le manuscrit « Llanstephan I » (xiiie siècle). Dans cette version, où est interpolé le conte de Lludd et Llevelys, l’influence de l’abbaye de Valle Crucis est tangible.

abstract:

B. Roberts describes one of the three older versions of the Welsh Brut y Brenhinedd, found, among others, in the Llanstephan I manuscript (13th c.). In this version, the Lludd and Llevelys tale has been inserted. Its environment, the abbey of Valle Crucis, can be seen to have a measurable impact.

B. Roberts décrit l’une des trois versions anciennes du Brut y Brenhinedd gallois, conservée entre autres dans le manuscrit « Llanstephan I » (xiiie siècle). Dans cette version, où est interpolé le conte de Lludd et Llevelys, l’influence de l’abbaye de Valle Crucis est tangible.

Roberts, Brynley F., “Two languages, one culture”, in: Bouget, Hélène, and Magali Coumert (eds), Histoires des Bretagnes 5: en marge, Histoires des Bretagnes 5, Brest: CRBC, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 2015. 213–226.
Roberts, Brynley F., Richard Sharpe, Helen Watt, and Cultures of Knowledge, “The correspondence of Edward Lhuyd”, Early modern letters online (EMLO), Online: Oxford, Bodleian Library. URL: <http://emlo-portal.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/collections/?catalogue=edward-lhwyd>. 
abstract:
The second Keeper of Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum, Edward Lhwyd was an important naturalist, archaeologist, and linguist. He published the first catalogue of English fossils, the Lithophilacii Britannici Ichnographia (1699), in a limited edition of 120 copies, and many of the specific fossils he illustrated survive still in Oxford’s collections. A keen naturalist, he assisted (among many others) John Ray with his botanical work. Perhaps Lhwyd’s greatest claim to scholarly significance, however, rests upon the extensive tours he made of the Celtic lands to continue his work as a naturalist and for the dual purposes of archaeological and linguistic survey. This resulted, on the one hand, in the most sophisticated archaeological work of the day; and on the other, in the first serious comparative study of the Welsh, Scots and Irish Gaelic, Cornish, and Breton languages. For this latter achievement Lhwyd is now regarded as the father of Celtic linguistics. His results were printed in Glossography (1707), the first volume of his projected Archaeologia Britannica, giving some account additional to what has hitherto been publish’d, of the languages, histories, and customs of the original inhabitants of Great Britain: from collections and observations in travels through Wales, Cornwal, Bas-Bretagne, Ireland and Scotland. This linguistic work, of course, must be associated with Lhwyd’s broader intellectual pursuits in Oxford, where he was not only Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum, but also an active member of the Oxford Philosophical Society in its early years.
abstract:
The second Keeper of Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum, Edward Lhwyd was an important naturalist, archaeologist, and linguist. He published the first catalogue of English fossils, the Lithophilacii Britannici Ichnographia (1699), in a limited edition of 120 copies, and many of the specific fossils he illustrated survive still in Oxford’s collections. A keen naturalist, he assisted (among many others) John Ray with his botanical work. Perhaps Lhwyd’s greatest claim to scholarly significance, however, rests upon the extensive tours he made of the Celtic lands to continue his work as a naturalist and for the dual purposes of archaeological and linguistic survey. This resulted, on the one hand, in the most sophisticated archaeological work of the day; and on the other, in the first serious comparative study of the Welsh, Scots and Irish Gaelic, Cornish, and Breton languages. For this latter achievement Lhwyd is now regarded as the father of Celtic linguistics. His results were printed in Glossography (1707), the first volume of his projected Archaeologia Britannica, giving some account additional to what has hitherto been publish’d, of the languages, histories, and customs of the original inhabitants of Great Britain: from collections and observations in travels through Wales, Cornwal, Bas-Bretagne, Ireland and Scotland. This linguistic work, of course, must be associated with Lhwyd’s broader intellectual pursuits in Oxford, where he was not only Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum, but also an active member of the Oxford Philosophical Society in its early years.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Ystoriaeu brenhinedd Ynys Brydeyn: a fourteenth-century Welsh Brut”, in: Eska, Joseph F. [ed.], Narrative in Celtic tradition: essays in honor of Edgar M. Slotkin, CSANA Yearbook 8–9, New York: Colgate University Press, 2011. 217–227.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Breuddwyd Maxen Wledig: Why? When?"”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky, and Leslie Ellen Jones (eds), Heroic poets and poetic heroes in Celtic tradition: a Festschrift for Patrick K. Ford, CSANA Yearbook 3–4, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005. 303–314.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Die mittelkymrischen Prosaerzählungen: Nomenklatur und Klassifikation”, in: Maier, Bernhard, Stefan Zimmer, and Christiane Batke (eds), 150 Jahre ‘Mabinogion’ – deutsch-walisische Kulturbeziehungen, Buchreihe der Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 19, Tübingen: Niemeyer, 2001. 101–110.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Where were the Four Branches of the Mabinogi written?”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky [ed.], The individual in Celtic literatures, CSANA Yearbook 1, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001. 61–73.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Edward Lhuyd a darganfod Hen Gymraeg”, in: Eska, Joseph F., R. Geraint Gruffydd, and Nicolas Jacobs (eds.), Hispano-Gallo-Brittonica: essays in honour of professor D. Ellis Evans on the occasion of his sixty-fifth birthday, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1995. 151–165.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Syr John a'r Eidalwr”, in: Jones, Tegwyn, and E. B. Fryde (eds), Ysgrifau a cherddi cyflwynedig i Daniel Huws: Essays and poems presented to Daniel Huws, Aberystwyth: National Library of Wales, 1994. 179–194.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Diwylliant y ffin”, in: Edwards, Hywel Teifi (ed.), Cwm Tawe, Cyfres y cymoedd, Llandysul: Gomer Press, 1993. xii + 328 pp. 45–80.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Culhwch ac Olwen, the triads, saints' lives”, in: Bromwich, Rachel, A. O. H. Jarman, and Brynley F. Roberts (eds.), The Arthur of the Welsh. The Arthurian legend in medieval Welsh literature, Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages 1, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1991. 73–95.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia regum Britanniae and Brut y Brenhinedd”, in: Bromwich, Rachel, A. O. H. Jarman, and Brynley F. Roberts (eds.), The Arthur of the Welsh. The Arthurian legend in medieval Welsh literature, Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages 1, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1991. 97–116.
Roberts, Brynley F., “Rhai o gerddi ymddiddan Llyfr Du Caerfyrddin”, in: Bromwich, Rachel, and R. Brinley Jones (eds.), Astudiaethau ar yr hengerdd / Studies in old Welsh poetry: cyflwynedig i Syr Idris Foster, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1978. 281–325.