Texts

verse beg. Scél lem duib

  • Late Old Irish, Early Middle Irish
  • verse
  • Early Irish poetry, Early Irish lyrics
Early Irish poem on the coming of winter.
Initial words (verse)
  • Scél lem duib
“I have news for you”
Context(s)The (textual) context(s) to which the present text belongs or in which it is cited in part or in whole.
Speaker/Addressee
Speaker: Finn mac CumaillFinn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
Fionn mac Cumhaill, Find úa Báiscni
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle, Finn mac Cumaill, Cormac mac Airt)
Finn mac Cumaill (earlier mac Umaill?), Find úa Báiscni: central hero in medieval Irish and Scottish literature of the so-called Finn Cycle; warrior-hunter and leader of a fían
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Author
Ascribed to: Finn mac CumaillFinn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
Fionn mac Cumhaill, Find úa Báiscni
(time-frame ass. with Finn Cycle, Finn mac Cumaill, Cormac mac Airt)
Finn mac Cumaill (earlier mac Umaill?), Find úa Báiscni: central hero in medieval Irish and Scottish literature of the so-called Finn Cycle; warrior-hunter and leader of a fían
See more
Anonymous. Ascribed to Finn mac Cumaill in Rawlinson B 502.
Language
  • Late Old Irish Early Middle Irish
Date
9th or 10th century (Murphy)
Form
verse (primary)
Textual relationships
Related: Tánic samTánic samPoem on the coming of summer, attributed to Finn mac Cumaill. It evokes an image of the season by referring, for instance, to the appearance and behaviour of stags, dogs, salmon and birds such as the cuckoo and the blackbird.

Classification

Early Irish poetryEarly Irish poetry
...

Early Irish lyricsEarly Irish lyrics
...

Sources

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] [tr.] Murphy, Gerard [ed. and tr.], “Anonymous: Summer has gone”, in: Murphy, Gerard [ed. and tr.], Early Irish lyrics: eighth to twelfth century, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1956. 160–161, 235–236.
CELT – edition: <link>
[ed.] [tr.] Meyer, Kuno [ed. and tr.], Four Old-Irish songs of summer and winter, London: Nutt, 1903.
[ed.] [tr.] Bernard, J. H., and Robert Atkinson (eds.), The Irish Liber hymnorum, 2 vols, vol. 1: Text and introduction, Henry Bradshaw Society 13, London: Henry Bradshaw Society, 1898.  
comments: Volume 1: Text and introduction
Volume 2: Translation
Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive – originally from Google Books: <link>, <link>
174 Liber hymnorum version
[ed.] [tr.] Stokes, Whitley [ed. and tr.], “The Bodleian Amra Choluimb Chille”, Revue Celtique 20 (1899): 31–55, 132–183, 248–289, 400–437. Corrigenda in Revue Celtique 21 (1900): 133–136.
Internet Archive: <link>, <link>
258 Rawlinson B 502 version (Ch. 5 § 63).
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
Page created
May 2011, last updated: August 2021