Bibliography

David N. (David Norman)
Dumville

130 publications between 1972 and 2018 indexed
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1983

article
Dumville, David N., “Motes and beams: two Insular computistical manuscripts”, Peritia 2 (1983): 248–256.
article
Dumville, David, “Ekiurid’s Celtic lingua: an ethnological difficulty in Waltharius”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 6 (Winter, 1983): 87–93.
article
Dumville, David N., “Brittany and ‘Armes Prydein Vawr’”, Études Celtiques 20 (1983): 145–159.  
abstract:
Réévaluation des conditions historiques où fut écrit le poème gallois Armes Prydein Vawr (une prophétie politique appelant les Bretons à s’unir contre les Anglo-Saxons) . Ce poème daterait du milieu du Xe siècle. L’ intervention des bretons armoricains dans la «coalition celtique » évoquée par l’auteur du poème est surprenante, car les Bretons étaient alliés aux rois Anglo-saxons dans la première moitié du Xe s . ; mais cela se comprend si l’on admet que le poème évoque des mythes plutôt que des réalités. Le mythe de l’union des bretons armoricains et insulaires est un thème symbolisé par les rois Conan et Cadwaladr, deux chefs, armoricain et gallois, qui doivent réunifier les bretons. Leurs noms ont dû être associés par la tradition littéraire bien avant Armes Prydein Vawr.
Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 20, 1983: <link>
abstract:
Réévaluation des conditions historiques où fut écrit le poème gallois Armes Prydein Vawr (une prophétie politique appelant les Bretons à s’unir contre les Anglo-Saxons) . Ce poème daterait du milieu du Xe siècle. L’ intervention des bretons armoricains dans la «coalition celtique » évoquée par l’auteur du poème est surprenante, car les Bretons étaient alliés aux rois Anglo-saxons dans la première moitié du Xe s . ; mais cela se comprend si l’on admet que le poème évoque des mythes plutôt que des réalités. Le mythe de l’union des bretons armoricains et insulaires est un thème symbolisé par les rois Conan et Cadwaladr, deux chefs, armoricain et gallois, qui doivent réunifier les bretons. Leurs noms ont dû être associés par la tradition littéraire bien avant Armes Prydein Vawr.

1982

article
Dumville, David N., “Latin and Irish in the Annals of Ulster, A.D. 431–1050”, in: Dorothy Whitelock, Rosamund McKitterick, and David N. Dumville (eds), Ireland in early medieval Europe: studies in memory of Kathleen Hughes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982. 320–341.  
Reprinted in 1990, essay XVII.
Reprinted in 1990, essay XVII.
article
Whitelock, Dorothy, Rosamond McKitterick, and David N. Dumville, “Kathleen Winifred Hughes 1926–1977”, in: Dorothy Whitelock, Rosamund McKitterick, and David N. Dumville (eds), Ireland in early medieval Europe: studies in memory of Kathleen Hughes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982. 1–18.
edited work
Whitelock, Dorothy, Rosamund McKitterick, and David N. Dumville (eds), Ireland in early medieval Europe: studies in memory of Kathleen Hughes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.
article
Dumville, David N., “The ‘six’ sons of Rhodri Mawr: a problem in Asser’s Life of King Alfred”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 4 (Winter, 1982): 5–18.  
Reprinted in 1993, essay XV.
Reprinted in 1993, essay XV.

1981

article
Dumville, David N., “‘Beowulf’ and the Celtic world: the uses of evidence”, Traditio 37 (1981): 109–160.  
Reprinted in 1993: essay IV.
Reprinted in 1993: essay IV.

1980

article
Dumville, David N., “The sixteenth-century history of two Cambridge books from Sawley”, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society 7:4 (1980): 427–444.
work
Hughes, Kathleen, Celtic Britain in the early Middle Ages: studies in Scottish and Welsh sources, ed. David N. Dumville, Studies in Celtic History, 2, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1980.  
Papers revised or previously unpublished
Papers revised or previously unpublished

1979

article
Dumville, David N., “The ætheling: a study in Anglo-Saxon constitutional history”, Anglo-Saxon England 8 (1979): 1–33.

1978

article
Dumville, David N., “The Welsh Latin annals”, Studia Celtica 12–13 (1977–1978): 461–467.
article
Dumville, David N., “Towards an interpretation of Fís Adomnáin”, Studia Celtica 12–13 (1977–1978): 62–77.

1977

article
Dumville, David N., “Sub-Roman Britain: history and legend”, History, new series, 62 (1977): 173–192.  
article
Dumville, David N., “Celtic-Latin texts in northern England, c. 1150–c. 1250”, Celtica 12 (1977): 19–49.
article
Dumville, David N., “Kingship, genealogies and regnal lists”, in: Peter H. Sawyer, and Ian N. Wood [eds.], Early medieval kingship, Leeds: School of History, University of Leeds, 1977. 72–104.  
Reprinted in 1990: essay XV.
Reprinted in 1990: essay XV.
article
Dumville, David N., “On the north British section of the Historia Brittonum”, Welsh History Review 8:3 (June 1977, 1976–1977): 345–354.

1976

article
Dumville, David N., “Echtrae and immram: some problems of definition”, Ériu 27 (1976): 73–94.
article
Dumville, David N., “‘Nennius’ and the Historia Brittonum”, Studia Celtica 10–11 (1975–1976): 78–95.
article
Dumville, David N., “The textual history of Lebor Bretnach: a preliminary study”, Éigse 16:4 (Geimhreadh 1976, 1975–1976): 255–273.
article
Dumville, David N., “The Liber Floridus of Lambert of Saint-Omer and the Historia Brittonum”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 26 (1975, 1974–1976): 103–122.
article
Dumville, David N., “Scéla lái brátha and the collation of Leabhar na hUidhre”, Éigse 16:1 (Samhradh 1975, 1975–1976): 24–28.
article
Dumville, David N., “The Anglian collection of royal genealogies and regnal lists”, Anglo-Saxon England 5 (1976): 23–50.  
Reprinted with revisions in 1990, essay V.
– Cambridge Journals: <link>
Reprinted with revisions in 1990, essay V.

1975

article
Dumville, David N., “Textual history of the Welsh-Latin Historia Brittonum”, Ph.D. thesis, Edinburgh University, 1975.  
abstract:
This thesis presents a new edition of the major recensions of the Historia Brittonum. It is the first to depart from the pattern of conflated texts which has been followed by editors since 1691. Each may now be read as a text in its own right. I have argued that the 'Harleian' recension is the primary version of the Historia Brittonum and belongs to the year 829/30, and have shown that the attribution of the work to one 'Nennius' is late and unacceptable. The complicated textual tradition has been examined, from this early-ninth-century origin, throughout its mediaeval history; the fullest development is seen in the 'Sawley' recension of the beginning of the thirteenth century. I have also considered the early modern tradition of the work, represented by a large group of paper manuscripts prepared by or for the antiquaries of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as no printed text was available until 1691. In addition to detailed studies of manuscripts and textual tradition, I have prepared a literal modern English translation of the primary recension and have made a detailed preliminary study of its latinity. My remarks on the later recensions concentrate on establishing the filiation of the manuscripts and on placing each new version within the context of the textual tradition as a whole. This has seemed to be the primary requirement in any new investigation of the Historia. Work can now go forward, from a secure textual base, on the implications of this important series of texts for historical and literary studies.
(source: ERA)
Edinburgh Research Archive – PDF: <link>
abstract:
This thesis presents a new edition of the major recensions of the Historia Brittonum. It is the first to depart from the pattern of conflated texts which has been followed by editors since 1691. Each may now be read as a text in its own right. I have argued that the 'Harleian' recension is the primary version of the Historia Brittonum and belongs to the year 829/30, and have shown that the attribution of the work to one 'Nennius' is late and unacceptable. The complicated textual tradition has been examined, from this early-ninth-century origin, throughout its mediaeval history; the fullest development is seen in the 'Sawley' recension of the beginning of the thirteenth century. I have also considered the early modern tradition of the work, represented by a large group of paper manuscripts prepared by or for the antiquaries of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as no printed text was available until 1691. In addition to detailed studies of manuscripts and textual tradition, I have prepared a literal modern English translation of the primary recension and have made a detailed preliminary study of its latinity. My remarks on the later recensions concentrate on establishing the filiation of the manuscripts and on placing each new version within the context of the textual tradition as a whole. This has seemed to be the primary requirement in any new investigation of the Historia. Work can now go forward, from a secure textual base, on the implications of this important series of texts for historical and literary studies.
(source: ERA)

1974

article
Dumville, David N., “Some aspects of the chronology of the Historia Brittonum”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 25 (May 1974, 1972–1974): 439–445.  
Reprinted in 1990: essay IV.
Reprinted in 1990: essay IV.
article
Dumville, David N., “A paraphrase of the Historia Brittonum: two fragments”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 25 (1972–1974): 101–105.
article
Dumville, David N., “The Corpus Christi ‘Nennius’”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 25 (1972–1974): 369–380.

1973

article
Dumville, David N., “Biblical apocrypha and the early Irish: a preliminary investigation”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 73 C (1973): 299–338.
article
Dumville, David N., “A new chronicle-fragment of early British history”, The English Historical Review 88 (1973): 312–314.  
Reprinted with addenda as essay VI in Histories and pseudo-histories of the insular Middle Ages (1990).
JSTOR: <link> Oxfordjournals.org: <link>
Reprinted with addenda as essay VI in Histories and pseudo-histories of the insular Middle Ages (1990).

1972

article
Dumville, David N., “Liturgical drama and panegyric responsory from the eighth century? A re-examination of the origin and contents of the ninth-century section of the Book of Cerne”, The Journal of Theological Studies NS 23 (October, 1972): 374–400.