Texts

verse beg. Huait a meic hui Moguirni ... A Eochaid Airtt Fuath arafalnather iath aneoil

  • Early Irish
  • verse, rosc

An exchange of two roscada found in the context of an origin legend concerning the Fothairt. The first, shorter rosc (beg. Huait a meic hui Moguirni) is uttered by Eochaid Fúath Airt, ancestor of the Fothairt, and addressed to one Moccu Mugairne, who utters the second, longer rosc to him (beg. A Eochaid Airtt Fuath arafalnather iath aneoil), in the course of which he prophecies the coming of Brigit (Brig eoit).

First words (verse)
  • Huait a meic hui Moguirni ... A Eochaid Airtt Fuath arafalnather iath aneoil
Speaker/Addressee
Speaker: Eochaid Find Fúath nAirtEochaid Find Fúath nAirt
(supp. fl. c.2nd century)
Eochaid Fúath nAirt
In Irish historical tradition, eponymous ancestor of the Fothairt, a son of Feidlimid Rechtaid and brother of Conn Cétchathach.
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Moccu MugairneMoccu Mugairne
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.

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Manuscripts
Language
  • Early Irish
  • No linguistic analysis is known at this stage to arrive at a reliable dating of the composition of the text. As far as suggestions have been made at all, the text is usually regarded as early or potentially early. For the second rosc, James Carney (1989) has suggested a date of c.600.
Form
verse, rosc (primary)
Metre
  • retoiric or rosc(ad)

Classification

Subjects

Eochaid Find Fúath nAirtEochaid Find Fúath nAirt
(supp. fl. c.2nd century)
Eochaid Fúath nAirt
In Irish historical tradition, eponymous ancestor of the Fothairt, a son of Feidlimid Rechtaid and brother of Conn Cétchathach.
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Moccu MugairneMoccu Mugairne
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.

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Brigit of KildareBrigit of Kildare
(c. 439/452–c. 524/526)
patron saint of Kildare, whose cult spread both within and outside of Ireland.
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FothairtFothairt
Fotharta
No short description available
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Cú Chorb mac Moga CorbCú Chorb mac Moga Corb
prehistoric king of Leinster; son of Mug Corb; given as the father of four eponymous progenitors of Leinster ruling families: Nia Corb (a quo Dál Niad Corb), Mess Corb (a quo Dál Messe/Messin Corb), Cormac (a quo Dál Cor(b)maic) and Cairpre Cluithechair (a quo Dál Coirbbri)
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Sources

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] OʼBrien, M. A. [ed.], Corpus genealogiarum Hiberniae, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1962.  
comments: Reprinted in 1976 and 2005, with an introduction by J. V. Kelleher.
CELT – pp. 1–332 (Rawl. B 502): <link>
79–81 Versions from Rawl. B 502 and the Book of Lecan.
[ed.] [tr.] Dobbs, Margaret E., “On the settlement of the Fotharta and the Laigsi”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 16 (1927): 395–405.
397–398 (texts); 401 (partial translation) Versions from Rawl. B 502 and the Book of Lecan. An English translation is attempted for part of the text.
[tr.] OʼBrien, M. A., “The Old Irish Life of St. Brigit: Part II. Introduction and notes”, Irish Historical Studies 1:4 (September, 1939): 343–353.
Translates the passage that refers to Brigit: “A fair birth, fair dignity which will come to thee thereafter from thy children's descendants, who shall be called from her great virtues truly pious Brig-eoit; she will be another Mary, mother of the great Lord.”
Translation wanted

Secondary sources (select)

Carney, James P., “The dating of archaic Irish verse”, in: Stephen N. Tranter, and Hildegard L. C. Tristram (eds), Early Irish literature — media and communication / Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit in der frühen irischen Literatur, 10, Tübingen: Narr, 1989. 39–55.
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Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
Page created
June 2021