Bibliography

Lauran
Toorians
s. xx / s. xxi

95 publications between 1986 and 2021 indexed
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Works authored

Toorians, Lauran, Dafydd ap Gwilym (ca. 1315-1350): bloemlezing uit het werk van de meest gevierde dichter van Wales, 2nd ed., Online, 2016. URL: <http://laurantoorians.com/?page_id=468 http://fleursdumal.nl/mag/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Toorians-Dafydd_ap_Gwilym.pdf>.
Toorians, Lauran, Towards a grammar of Middle Cornish, Online, 2011–2014–. URL: <http://laurantoorians.com/?page_id=128>. 
abstract:

During the years 1987-1991 I have been working in the department of Comparative Linguistics at Leiden University. My assignment was to write a grammar of Middle Cornish (which was to be my PhD-thesis) and in the mean time I was teaching courses in Middle Welsh, Middle Breton and Middle Cornish. Unfortunately, time and money ran out before the grammar was finished and even though I continued the work during the following two years, the grammar – and so the thesis – remained unfinished.

[...] On various occasions it has been suggested to me to hand in the work as it stands and to get my doctorate, but two reasons withheld me: 1. The idea that I had done only half the job; and 2. The notion that a published, incomplete grammar would not easily be taken up by others to be completed. Having a website of my own allows me to find at least a partial solution to this latter problem. By publishing my material on this site it becomes available to all interested. Thus the material was first published on the internet in February 2011. When I moved the website to another url this seemed like a good moment to correct some remaining typing errors as well as to slightly brush up the general presentation and so the version found here is designated ‘Version 1.1 – April 2014’.

abstract:

During the years 1987-1991 I have been working in the department of Comparative Linguistics at Leiden University. My assignment was to write a grammar of Middle Cornish (which was to be my PhD-thesis) and in the mean time I was teaching courses in Middle Welsh, Middle Breton and Middle Cornish. Unfortunately, time and money ran out before the grammar was finished and even though I continued the work during the following two years, the grammar – and so the thesis – remained unfinished.

[...] On various occasions it has been suggested to me to hand in the work as it stands and to get my doctorate, but two reasons withheld me: 1. The idea that I had done only half the job; and 2. The notion that a published, incomplete grammar would not easily be taken up by others to be completed. Having a website of my own allows me to find at least a partial solution to this latter problem. By publishing my material on this site it becomes available to all interested. Thus the material was first published on the internet in February 2011. When I moved the website to another url this seemed like a good moment to correct some remaining typing errors as well as to slightly brush up the general presentation and so the version found here is designated ‘Version 1.1 – April 2014’.

Hofman, Rijcklof, Bernadette Smelik, and Lauran Toorians [eds.], Kelten in Nederland, 2nd ed., Utrecht: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2000.
Rootseler, Mick van, and Lauran Toorians, Manx: Keltische taal en cultuur van het eiland Man, 2nd ed., Utrecht: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 1997.
Toorians, Lauran, Dafydd ap Gwilym (ca. 1315-1350): bloemlezing uit het werk van de meest gevierde dichter van Wales, Kruispunt, 167, Bruges: Kruispunt, 1996.
Toorians, Lauran, and Kees Veelenturf, Dr Th. M. Th. Chotzen (1901-1945): een biografische schets, Utrecht: Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies, 1993.
Toorians, Lauran, The Middle Cornish charter endorsement. The making of a marriage in medieval Cornwall [Middle Cornish text, with introduction, translation, commentary and glossary critically edited. With a paleological description of the manuscript by J. P. M. Jansen], Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Sprachwissenschaft, 67, Innsbruck, 1991.
Schrijver, Peter, and Lauran Toorians, De oudste Keltische poëzie: een bloemlezing, De Lantaarn, 43, Leiden: Stichting De Lantaarn, 1986.

Works edited

Toorians, Lauran (ed.), Kelten en de Nederlanden van prehistorie tot heden, Orbis Linguarum, 1, Leuven and Paris: Peeters, 1998.
Rootseler, Mick van, Nicki Bullinga, Erwin Matheeuwsen, and Lauran Toorians (eds), Vijf jaar Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies: lustrumuitgave, Utrecht: Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies, 1995.
Gulik, Koen van, Arnoud Heerings, Henk Rijkers, and Lauran Toorians (eds), Willibrord tussen Ierland en Rome: een bundel historische en muzikaal-liturgische bijdragen, Utrecht: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 1995.
Hofman, Rijcklof, C. J. Jiskoot, Karel Jongeling, Peter Schrijver, Bernadette Smelik, and Lauran Toorians (eds), Welsh & Breton studies in memory of Th. M. Th. Chotzen. Proceedings of a Colloquium organized by the A. G. van Hamel Foundation for Celtic Studies, Utrecht — Amsterdam 23-24 April 1993, Studia Hameliana, 1, Utrecht: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 1995.
Jiskoot, Jojanne, Lauran Toorians, and Jurjen D. Fennema (eds), Kelten in Nederland?: catalogus bij de gelijknamige tentoonstelling in het Allard Pierson Museum, 23 april t/m 11 juni 1993, Amsterdam: Allard Pierson Museum, 1993.

Contributions to journals

Toorians, Lauran, “Een etymologie voor Vlaanderen: waar de wol vandaan komt”, Bulletin d'Information de la Société Belge d’Études Celtiques / Nieuwsbericht van het Belgisch Genootschap voor Keltische Studies 35 (2021): 65–72.  
Toorians, Lauran, “Waren de oudste kades heggen? Twee verwante woorden voor mogelijk ook verwante zaken”, Tijdschrift voor waterstaatsgeschiedenis 29 (2020): 20–25.
Toorians, Lauran, “Probable and possible Celtic names in North Holland: Huisduinen, Texel, Den Helder, Helsdeur”, Voprosy onomastiki 16:2 (2019): 168–177.  
abstract:
The paper focuses on the probability of the Celtic substratum hypothesis in the toponymy of North Holland. Agreeing that the most north-western tip of the Netherlands is an unlikely place to look for Celtic toponyms, the author suggests that the name Huisduinen relates to the same group of names of which Heusden is the most common representative, and which appears to have a Celtic etymology. Thus making it a tempting task to look at a few other names in the same area. As the area lost most of its population in the 4th century AD and became repopulated in the 5th century, language shift offers a possible scenario for a change from Celtic to Germanic with remnants of a Celtic substratum surviving up to the present day. In the same period, the landscape involved saw radical changes as well. In earlier publications it has been suggested that the medieval name Uxalia may be Celtic. Here it is suggested that this name may originally refer to the present-day island of Texel and not — as it later did — to the neighbouring island of Vlieland. A Celtic etymology is also proposed for the names Helsdeur and Den Helder, which — if accepted — have related etymologies. The name Helsdeur refers to the deepest part of the strait between the mainland of the province North Holland and the island of Texel. The lack of early attestations of this name is explained by suggesting its probable taboo status. This hypothesis is supported by a series of relevant examples of taboo place names in the maritime context.
abstract:
The paper focuses on the probability of the Celtic substratum hypothesis in the toponymy of North Holland. Agreeing that the most north-western tip of the Netherlands is an unlikely place to look for Celtic toponyms, the author suggests that the name Huisduinen relates to the same group of names of which Heusden is the most common representative, and which appears to have a Celtic etymology. Thus making it a tempting task to look at a few other names in the same area. As the area lost most of its population in the 4th century AD and became repopulated in the 5th century, language shift offers a possible scenario for a change from Celtic to Germanic with remnants of a Celtic substratum surviving up to the present day. In the same period, the landscape involved saw radical changes as well. In earlier publications it has been suggested that the medieval name Uxalia may be Celtic. Here it is suggested that this name may originally refer to the present-day island of Texel and not — as it later did — to the neighbouring island of Vlieland. A Celtic etymology is also proposed for the names Helsdeur and Den Helder, which — if accepted — have related etymologies. The name Helsdeur refers to the deepest part of the strait between the mainland of the province North Holland and the island of Texel. The lack of early attestations of this name is explained by suggesting its probable taboo status. This hypothesis is supported by a series of relevant examples of taboo place names in the maritime context.
Lauran Toorians, “[Review of: Liam Breatnach (ed.) • Katharine Simms (ed.) • Ruairí Ó hUiginn (ed.) • Damian McManus (ed.), Proceedings of the XIV International Congress of Celtic Studies, held in Maynooth University, 1–5 August 2011 (2015)]”, in: Simon Rodway (ed.), Journal of Celtic Linguistics 18 (2017): 246–249.
Lauran Toorians, “Keltisch Schotland serieus nemen”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 73 (2017): 11.
Toorians, Lauran, “Afdalen van een berg in Wales”, Brabant Cultureel 64:6 (december, 2015). URL: <http://www.cubra.nl/specialebijdragen/BrabantCultureel/BC_BL_201506/lauran_toorians_louis_soeterbroek.htm>. 
abstract:
Een Bredanaar die een novelle publiceert in het Wels. Erg waarschijnlijk klinkt dat niet, maar in 1947 gebeurde het. De auteur was Louis Soeterboek en hij werd er niet beroemd mee. Toch bleef hij schrijven, zij het niet meer in het Wels. Bekend werd hij vooral als marketinggenie.
(source: Introduction)
abstract:
Een Bredanaar die een novelle publiceert in het Wels. Erg waarschijnlijk klinkt dat niet, maar in 1947 gebeurde het. De auteur was Louis Soeterboek en hij werd er niet beroemd mee. Toch bleef hij schrijven, zij het niet meer in het Wels. Bekend werd hij vooral als marketinggenie.
(source: Introduction)
Toorians, Lauran, “Burorina van Domburg”, Zuidwesterheem: Informatieblad van de AWN-vrijwilligers in de archeologie, afdeling Zeeland 27:84 (september, 2015): 18–21.
Toorians, Lauran, “No badger in the bag”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 62 (2015): 199–211.
Toorians, Lauran, “ [Review of: Loicq, Jean, Les noms de rivières de Wallonie, y compris les régions germanophones. Dictionnaire analytique et historique, Mémoires de la Commission Royale de Toponymie en de Dialectologie, section Wallonne, 26, Louvain, Paris: Peeters, 2014.]”, Tijdschrift voor Waterstaatsgeschiedenis 24 (2015): 47–49.
Lauran Toorians, “Festschrift voor Katharine Simms [Review of: Seán Duffy (ed.), Princes, prelates and poets in medieval Ireland: essays in honour of Katharine Simms (2013)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 62 (2014): 13–14.
Toorians, Lauran, “Luxuria, Gula and Temperentia in Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet”, Australian Celtic Journal 12 (2014): 127–159.
Toorians, Lauran, “ [Review of: Egeler, Matthias, Celtic influences in Germanic religion: a survey, Münchner Nordistische Studien, 15, Munich: Herbert Utz Verlag, 2013. 156 pp.]”, Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik 72 (2014): 321–322.
Toorians, Lauran, “ [Review of: Hofeneder, Andreas, and Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel (eds), Théonymie celtique, cultes, interpretatio = Keltische Theonymie, Kulte, interpretatio: X. workshop F.E.R.C.AN., Paris 24.–26.Mai 2010, Mitteilungen der Prähistorischen Kommission, 79, Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2013.]”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 61 (2014): 255–258.
Toorians, Lauran, “Communiceren met een heiligenleven: Lebuïnus en de lezer”, Madoc: Tijdschrift over de Middeleeuwen 25:4 (December, 2012): 241–249.
Lauran Toorians, “Door een koloniale bril [Review of: Robin Frame, Colonial Ireland 1169–1369 (2012)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 56 (2012): 11.
Toorians, Lauran, “Migratie. Thomas en Charles Morgan”, De Waterschans 42:4 (December, 2012): 121–136.
Toorians, Lauran, “The place-name Caspingio and its modern relatives: Heesbeen, Hesbaye / Haspengouw and Hespen”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 58 (2011): 183–199.
Toorians, Lauran, “Reclusive blackbirds and a scholarly ‘White Fuller’. Two notes on Irish ‘Nature Poetry’”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 61 (Summer, 2011): 87–90.
Toorians, Lauran, “Place-names reflecting Gaulish *coslo-dūnon: Coudun, Colembert and Heusden”, Études Celtiques 37 (2011): 153–158.  
abstract:
[FR] Plusieurs toponymes français paraissent conserver le nom gaulois du «coudrier », * koslo-, comme Coulon (Yonne, anc. Coslumnus), Coolus (Marne, Coslus, 869), et Coole (Marne, Cosla, 983). Ils ont curieusement conservé le groupe -sl-. L’auteur propose d’ajouter à ce groupe deux composés, Coudun (Oise, Cusdum 1157, Cosdunum 756) et Colembert (Pas-de-Calais, Colesberc 1121, Coslesberc 1172), composés avec les éléments gaul. dūnum, et germ. Berg. Le sens devait être : «hauteur couverte de coudriers » . L’auteur a trouvé un parallèle à Coudun * Coslo-dūnum, dans le toponyme Heusden, connu par trois exemples, dans le Limbourg belge (Husdinio 929), dans le Nord Brabant néerlandais (Hysdene 1108), et près de Gand. Il envisage aussi de rattacher un toponyme du Nord de la France, Houdain, Houdent, Houdeng. Pour Heusden comme pour Coudun, il faut supposer une simplification du groupe consonantique -sld-> -sd-.

[EN] Several French toponyms seem to preserve the Gaulish word for «hazel » , * koslo-, such as Coulon (Yonne, former Coslumnus), Coolus (Marne, Coslus, 869), et Coole (Marne, Cosla, 983). Curiously they have kept the -sl-group. The author’s proposal is to add two compound place names, Coudun (Oise, Cusdum 1157, Cosdunum 756) and Colembert (Pas-de-Calais, Colesberc 1121, Coslesberc 1172), compounded with the elements Gaul. dūnum, and Germ. Berg. The meaning was probably «a hill covered with hazel » . The author has identified a parallel to Coudun * Coslo-dūnum, in the toponym Heusden, known by three examples, in the Belgian Limburg (Husdinio 929), in the Dutch North Brabant (Hysdene 1108), and near Ghent. He is considering a link with a toponym from Northern France, Houdain, Houdent, Houdeng. For Heusden as well as for Coudun, one has to suppose a simplification of the consonantal group -sld-> -sd-.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 37, 2011: <link>
abstract:
[FR] Plusieurs toponymes français paraissent conserver le nom gaulois du «coudrier », * koslo-, comme Coulon (Yonne, anc. Coslumnus), Coolus (Marne, Coslus, 869), et Coole (Marne, Cosla, 983). Ils ont curieusement conservé le groupe -sl-. L’auteur propose d’ajouter à ce groupe deux composés, Coudun (Oise, Cusdum 1157, Cosdunum 756) et Colembert (Pas-de-Calais, Colesberc 1121, Coslesberc 1172), composés avec les éléments gaul. dūnum, et germ. Berg. Le sens devait être : «hauteur couverte de coudriers » . L’auteur a trouvé un parallèle à Coudun * Coslo-dūnum, dans le toponyme Heusden, connu par trois exemples, dans le Limbourg belge (Husdinio 929), dans le Nord Brabant néerlandais (Hysdene 1108), et près de Gand. Il envisage aussi de rattacher un toponyme du Nord de la France, Houdain, Houdent, Houdeng. Pour Heusden comme pour Coudun, il faut supposer une simplification du groupe consonantique -sld-> -sd-.

[EN] Several French toponyms seem to preserve the Gaulish word for «hazel » , * koslo-, such as Coulon (Yonne, former Coslumnus), Coolus (Marne, Coslus, 869), et Coole (Marne, Cosla, 983). Curiously they have kept the -sl-group. The author’s proposal is to add two compound place names, Coudun (Oise, Cusdum 1157, Cosdunum 756) and Colembert (Pas-de-Calais, Colesberc 1121, Coslesberc 1172), compounded with the elements Gaul. dūnum, and Germ. Berg. The meaning was probably «a hill covered with hazel » . The author has identified a parallel to Coudun * Coslo-dūnum, in the toponym Heusden, known by three examples, in the Belgian Limburg (Husdinio 929), in the Dutch North Brabant (Hysdene 1108), and near Ghent. He is considering a link with a toponym from Northern France, Houdain, Houdent, Houdeng. For Heusden as well as for Coudun, one has to suppose a simplification of the consonantal group -sld-> -sd-.
Vermunt, Marco, and Lauran Toorians, “Een cultusplaats uit de Romeinse tijd onder het stadscentrum. De opgraving op het Thaliaplein van 2002-2007”, De Waterschans 41:4 (December, 2011): 160–171.
Lauran Toorians, “Inheemse Matronenculten in de Eifel”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 52 (2011): 8.
Toorians, Lauran, “Migratie. Jan Moffet en de Schotse Vest in Bergen op Zoom”, De Waterschans 41:4 (December, 2011): 172–178.  
comments: This article deals with Scottish tradesmen in Bergen op Zoom in about 1500, and an altar dedicated to St Trinian that they had in the Bergse kerk.
comments: This article deals with Scottish tradesmen in Bergen op Zoom in about 1500, and an altar dedicated to St Trinian that they had in the Bergse kerk.
Toorians, Lauran, “Inheemse Matronenculten in de Eifel [Review of: Biller, Frank, Kultische Zentren und Matronenverehrung in der südlichen Germania inferior, Osnabrücker Forschungen zu Altertum und Antike-Rezeption, 13, Rahden/Westfalen: Verlag Marie Leidorf GmbH, 2010.]”, Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 52 (November, 2011): 8.
Lauran Toorians, “Een ‘grijs’ gebied in de naamkunde: de naam van de Caerosi”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 45 (2010): 9.
Toorians, Lauran, “Keltische Forschungen. A new series of Celtic studies”, Ollodagos: actes de la Société Belge d'Études Celtiques 23:2 (2009): 299–303.
Lauran Toorians, “Een Keltisch heiligdom in Bergen op Zoom?”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 42 (2009): 9.
Toorians, Lauran, “Betuwe en Hessen, Bataven en Chatten”, Naamkunde 36 (2008): 179–190.
Dbnl.org: <link>
Toorians, Lauran, “ [Review of: Coates, Richard, and Andrew Breeze, Celtic voices, English places. Studies of the Celtic impact on place-names in England, Stamford: Shaun Tyas, 2000.]”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 55 (2006–2007): 314–317.
Toorians, Lauran, “ [Review of: Falileyev, Alexander, and Morfydd E. Owen, The Leiden leechbook. A study of the earliest Neo-Brittonic medical compilation, Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Kulturwissenschaft, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2005.]”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 51 (2006): 108–109.
Toorians, Lauran, “Kelten in Mariemont”, Archeologie Magazine 14:4 (2006): 71.
Toorians, Lauran, “Wat zijn Kelten? Mensen die een Keltische taal spreken”, Archeologie Magazine 14:5 (2006): 6–11.
Toorians, Lauran, “De etymologie van Dorestat, Keltisch en Germaans”, Jaarboek Oud Utrecht (2005): 41–53.
Toorians, Lauran, “Belsebub gelijck. Een edelman uit Wales in een tombe in Bergen op Zoom”, Brabant Cultureel 54:9–10 (2005): 41–44.
Toorians, Lauran, “Keltische muntschat in Echt”, Archeologie Magazine 13:4 (2005): 51.
Toorians, Lauran, “ [Review of: Rübekeil, Ludwig, Diachrone Studien zur Kontaktzone zwischen Kelten und Germanen, Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2002.]”, NOWELE 45 (2004): 83–88.
Toorians, Lauran, “Een Keltische etymologie voor Orthen: Civitas de Ortduno tussen Uxellodūnon en Orthen”, Noordbrabants Historisch Jaarboek 21 (2004): 78–95.  
A Celtic etymology for Orthen (a neighbourhood in 's-Hertogenbosch, Noord-Brabant, The Netherlands): Civitas de Ortduno between Uxellodūnon and Orthen
A Celtic etymology for Orthen (a neighbourhood in 's-Hertogenbosch, Noord-Brabant, The Netherlands): Civitas de Ortduno between Uxellodūnon and Orthen
Toorians, Lauran, “Magusanus and the ‘Old Lad’: A case of Germanicised Celtic”, NOWELE 42 (March, 2003): 13–28.
Toorians, Lauran, “Some notes to Jufer & Luginbühl, Répertoire des dieux gaulois”, Ollodagos: actes de la Société Belge d'Études Celtiques 18 (2003): 145–149.
Toorians, Lauran, “ [Review of: Stuart, P., Nehalennia. Documenten in steen, Goes: De Koperen Tuin, 2003.]”, Archeologie Magazine 11:3 (2003): 72.
Toorians, Lauran, “Keltisch *kagjo-; kaai, kade, Cadzand, Seneucaega en Zennewijnen”, Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik 56 (2002): 17–22.  
abstract:

Schrijver 1999 argues that the Dutch word kaai, kade was borrowed into Dutch directly from a Celtic language which must have survived in the coastal areas of Flanders and the Netherlands into the early Middle Ages. Through Dutch is was later spread into French (quai) and other languages. Here it is pointed out that this argument can be strengthened by taking into account the place-name Cadzand (The Netherlands, province of Zeeland). The earliest attestation of this name dates from 1111-1115, two centuries before the earliest attestations of the etymon in French. The name of the goddess SENEUCAEGA is brought into the discussion. This occurs on a Roman altar from the early third century A.D., found near Zennewijnen (near Tiel along the river Waal). When analyzed as SENEU-CAEGA this name may contain the same etymon (the first member being similar to the River-Name Zenne). This not only explains the name of the goddess as 'River-Name' + Celtic *kagja (fem. of *kagjo- 'hedge, fence, enclosure', hence something like 'Deity of the Zenne-en-closure'?), but also makes it possible to explain the modem name Zennewijnen as a partial translation of this Divine Name, with Germanic *winjö- 'meadow, field' replacing Celtic *kagjo-. For the Celtic language spoken in the Flemish and Dutch coastal areas, the name North Sea Celtic has been proposed, as a parallel to North Sea Gerrnanic (Toorians 2001). As Schrijver (1999) showed, North Sea Germanic was shaped on a substratum of North Sea Celtic, a language close1y similar (and most probably related) to the British Celtic from which Welsh, Cornish and Breton were derive

abstract:

Schrijver 1999 argues that the Dutch word kaai, kade was borrowed into Dutch directly from a Celtic language which must have survived in the coastal areas of Flanders and the Netherlands into the early Middle Ages. Through Dutch is was later spread into French (quai) and other languages. Here it is pointed out that this argument can be strengthened by taking into account the place-name Cadzand (The Netherlands, province of Zeeland). The earliest attestation of this name dates from 1111-1115, two centuries before the earliest attestations of the etymon in French. The name of the goddess SENEUCAEGA is brought into the discussion. This occurs on a Roman altar from the early third century A.D., found near Zennewijnen (near Tiel along the river Waal). When analyzed as SENEU-CAEGA this name may contain the same etymon (the first member being similar to the River-Name Zenne). This not only explains the name of the goddess as 'River-Name' + Celtic *kagja (fem. of *kagjo- 'hedge, fence, enclosure', hence something like 'Deity of the Zenne-en-closure'?), but also makes it possible to explain the modem name Zennewijnen as a partial translation of this Divine Name, with Germanic *winjö- 'meadow, field' replacing Celtic *kagjo-. For the Celtic language spoken in the Flemish and Dutch coastal areas, the name North Sea Celtic has been proposed, as a parallel to North Sea Gerrnanic (Toorians 2001). As Schrijver (1999) showed, North Sea Germanic was shaped on a substratum of North Sea Celtic, a language close1y similar (and most probably related) to the British Celtic from which Welsh, Cornish and Breton were derive

Toorians, Lauran, “Ivonet Omnes en het begin van de Bretonse literatuur”, Kruispunt 188 (March, 2002): 232–239.
Fleurs du Mal: <link>
Toorians, Lauran, “Arthur in de vroegmiddeleeuwse traditie in Wales”, Kruispunt 188 (2002): 102–142.
Toorians, Lauran, “The Flowers of the Forest. In memoriam Frans Buisman”, Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 16 (November, 2002): 10.
Toorians, Lauran, “Een rode draak en ander ongedierte in middeleeuws Wales”, Ollodagos: actes de la Société Belge d'Études Celtiques 16 (2002): 3–24.
Toorians, Lauran, “Kelten aan de Nederlandse kust. Noordzeegermaans begon met Noordzeekeltisch”, Spiegel historiael 36 (2001): 112–117, 146.
Toorians, Lauran, “Keltische mode bij de Romeinen en in latere tijden: sieraden en kledingstukken die voortleefden”, Scarabee 31 (december, 1997): 43–46.
Toorians, Lauran, “Flemish settlements in twelfth-century Scotland”, Revue Belge de Philologie et d'Histoire / Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Filologie en Geschiedenis 74 (1996): 659–693.  
An appendix, “Handlist of Flemings in Scotland in the twelfth and thirteenth century”, is found on pp. 675-693.
An appendix, “Handlist of Flemings in Scotland in the twelfth and thirteenth century”, is found on pp. 675-693.
Toorians, Lauran, “Nogmaals ‘Walewein van Melle’ en de Vlaams-Keltische contacten”, Queeste: Tijdschrift over middeleeuwse letterkunde in de Nederlanden 1995 (1995): 97–108.
 : <link>
Toorians, Lauran, “Hans Memling en de Rode Draak”, Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 4:3 (1994): 88–90.
Toorians, Lauran, “De mythe van Albiobola”, Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 4:3 (1994): 98–100.
Toorians, Lauran, “Een Ierse en een Schotse mantel op Slot Duurstede”, Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 3:1 (1993): 26–27.
Toorians, Lauran, “De zalmsprong van Cú Chulainn”, Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 2:3 (1992): 57–59.
Toorians, Lauran, “Wizo Flandrensis and the Flemish settlement in Pembrokeshire”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 20 (Winter, 1990): 99–118.
Toorians, Lauran, “Passie, lief en leed: de oudste poëzie van het Keltische Cornwall”, Kruispunt 129 (1990): 3–55.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Bijsterveld, Arnoud-Jan, and Lauran Toorians, “Texandria revisited: in search of a territory lost in time”, in: Mirjam Kars, Roos van Oosten, Marcus A. Roxburgh, and Arno Verhoeven (eds), Rural riches & royal rags? Studies on medieval and modern archaeology presented to Frans Theuws, Zwolle: SPA-Uitgevers, 2018. 34–42.
Toorians, Lauran, “Naamkundige analyse van het theoniem Arcanua”, in: Ton Derks, and B. de Fraiture (eds), Een Romeins heiligdom en een vroegmiddeleeuws grafveld bij Buchten (L.). Verslag van een archeologisch noodonderzoek (1976), 226, Amersfoort: Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed, 2015. 156–157.
Cultureelerfgoed.nl: <link>
Toorians, Lauran, “Aduatuca, ‘place of the prophet’. The names of the Eburones as representatives of a Celtic language, with an excursus on Tungri”, in: Guido Creemers (ed.), Archaeological contributions to materials and immateriality, 4, Tongeren: Gallo-Roman Museum, 2013. 108–121.
Toorians, Lauran, “Wat leren de twee monumentale inscripties uit Ruimel ons over taal?”, in: Martijn Bink (ed.), Halder, hart van Romeins Brabant? 50 jaar archeologie in Halder: bijdragen aan het symposium, gehouden te Sint-Michielsgestel op 28 oktober 2011, Sint-Michielsgestel: Oudheidkundig Museum Sint-Michielsgestel, 2012. 69–80.
Toorians, Lauran, “Endlicher’s Glossary, an attempt to write its history”, in: Juan Luis García Alonso (ed.), Celtic and other languages in ancient Europe, 127, Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 2008. 153–184.
Toorians, Lauran, “Van SENEUCAEGA tot Zennewijnen: de talen van de Bataven”, in: Nico Roymans, Ton Derks, and Stijn Heeren (eds), Een Bataafse gemeenschap in de wereld van het Romeinse rijk. Opgravingen te Tiel-Passewaaij, Utrecht: Matrijs, 2007. 137–144.
Toorians, Lauran, “Das Leben von Muireadhach Albanach Ó Dálaigh: scel 7 arrumainte 7 stair”, in: Helmut Birkhan (ed.), Kelten-Einfälle an der Donau. Akten des Vierten Symposiums deutschsprachiger Keltologinnen und Keltologen ... Linz/Donau, 17.-21. Juli 2005, Denkschriften, Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2007. 573–582.  
abstract:
Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh lived around 1200. About twenty of his poems survive and he is the subject of various traditions. The Annals of the Four Masters tell in the year 1213 how, after the killing of a servant of Domhnall Mór Ó Domhnaill, he fled to Scotland. The Scottish bardic family Mac Mhuirich (MacVurich) is believed to descend from him and two of his poems were composed for the earliest Earls of Lennox. From other poems by Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh it is known that he took part in the fifth Crusade, which brought him to Damietta. These biographical “facts” pose various problems, mainly of a chronological nature. Thus, the first Earl of Lennox was long dead by 1213, which led scholars to believe that Muireadhach must have visited Scotland on an earlier occasion, before he went into exile. The Four Masters state that fleeing for Domhnall Mór, our poet sought refuge with Richard de Burgo, but we know that the latter was a powerless boy in 1213, which severely undermines the story in the annals. And Muireadhach’s visit to Damietta must have taken place in a rather narrow time-slot which appears to interfere with his exile in Scotland. Especially the anecdote in the Annals of the Four Masters is considered questionable, but no one seems prepared to do away with it completely. As it stands it is the only piece of historical “evidence” about the poet we have, apart from scanty references in his own poems. It has the attraction of a good story and dismissing it might lead to a complete loss of Muireadhach as a historical figure. In this paper I propose a new chronology for the life and (part of) the works of Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh in which all the available information seems to fall in place without having to give up the 1213 annal completely. This account even plays a key role in my argument, though I do not take it on face value. In my view the homicide was committed much earlier and 1213 is the year in which Muireadhach returned from Scotland to Ireland in an attempt to regain his position there. In the paper I concentrate on the earlier part of the life of the poet, but something will also be said about Damietta and the fifth Crusade. Recent translations of part of Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh’s work, with introductions, can be found in Thomas Owen Clancy (ed.), The Triumph Tree. Scotland’s earliest poetry AD 550–1350 (Edinburgh 1998) 247–283.
(source: via academia.edu)
abstract:
Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh lived around 1200. About twenty of his poems survive and he is the subject of various traditions. The Annals of the Four Masters tell in the year 1213 how, after the killing of a servant of Domhnall Mór Ó Domhnaill, he fled to Scotland. The Scottish bardic family Mac Mhuirich (MacVurich) is believed to descend from him and two of his poems were composed for the earliest Earls of Lennox. From other poems by Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh it is known that he took part in the fifth Crusade, which brought him to Damietta. These biographical “facts” pose various problems, mainly of a chronological nature. Thus, the first Earl of Lennox was long dead by 1213, which led scholars to believe that Muireadhach must have visited Scotland on an earlier occasion, before he went into exile. The Four Masters state that fleeing for Domhnall Mór, our poet sought refuge with Richard de Burgo, but we know that the latter was a powerless boy in 1213, which severely undermines the story in the annals. And Muireadhach’s visit to Damietta must have taken place in a rather narrow time-slot which appears to interfere with his exile in Scotland. Especially the anecdote in the Annals of the Four Masters is considered questionable, but no one seems prepared to do away with it completely. As it stands it is the only piece of historical “evidence” about the poet we have, apart from scanty references in his own poems. It has the attraction of a good story and dismissing it might lead to a complete loss of Muireadhach as a historical figure. In this paper I propose a new chronology for the life and (part of) the works of Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh in which all the available information seems to fall in place without having to give up the 1213 annal completely. This account even plays a key role in my argument, though I do not take it on face value. In my view the homicide was committed much earlier and 1213 is the year in which Muireadhach returned from Scotland to Ireland in an attempt to regain his position there. In the paper I concentrate on the earlier part of the life of the poet, but something will also be said about Damietta and the fifth Crusade. Recent translations of part of Muireadhach Ó Dálaigh’s work, with introductions, can be found in Thomas Owen Clancy (ed.), The Triumph Tree. Scotland’s earliest poetry AD 550–1350 (Edinburgh 1998) 247–283.
(source: via academia.edu)
Toorians, Lauran, “How prehistoric are the Celts and what can Celtic Studies do for archaeologists?”, in: Greta Anthoons, and Herman Clerinx (eds), The Grand 'Celtic' Story? Proceedings of the conference held in Brussels on 19 November 2005, 28, Brussels: Société Belge d'Études Celtiques, 2007. 69–79.
Toorians, Lauran, “De Cananefaten in taalkundig perspectief”, in: Wilco de Jonge, Jos Bazelmans, and Dick de Jager (eds), Forum Hadriani. Van Romeinse stad tot monument, Utrecht: Matrijs, 2006. 50–56.
Toorians, Lauran, “Low Countries, Celts in the”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia, 5 vols, Santa Barbara, Denver and Oxford: ABC-Clio, 2006. Vol. 3: 1192–1198.
Toorians, Lauran, “De Kelten en het Keltisch”, in: Sef Derkx, and Wim Hupperetz (eds), Het geheim van de Kelten, Venlo: Limburgs Museum, 2006. 28–31.
Toorians, Lauran, “Over Angelen en Britten. Moreel kwaad als ‘politieke erfzonde’”, in: Cors van der Burg, and Lourens Minnema (eds), In de ban van het kwaad. Het kwaad in religieuze verhalen wereldwijd, Zoetermeer, 2004. 258–269.  
Includes a translation of Historia Brittonum, chapters 36-42 and 47-48.
Includes a translation of Historia Brittonum, chapters 36-42 and 47-48.
Toorians, Lauran, “Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische studies — hoe het begon”, in: Inge Genee, Bart Jaski, and Bernadette Smelik (eds), Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre... Verhaal, taal en recht in de Keltische wereld. Liber amicorum voor Leni van Strien-Gerritsen, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2003. 21–26.
Dimitri Boekhoorn, Lauran Toorians, Mick van Rootseler, Mariska Costeris, Sonja van Stek, “[Vertalingen]”, in: Mick van Rootseler (ed.) • Karel Jongeling (ed.), De Mabinogion: oude Keltische verhalen uit Wales (2001).
Toorians, Lauran, “Flemish in Wales”, in: Glanville Price (ed.), Languages in Britain & Ireland, Oxford: Blackwell, 2000. 184–186. Chapter 15.
Toorians, Lauran, “Dafydd ap Gwilym (ca. 1315 – ca.1350)”, in: Lauran Toorians (ed.), Kelten en de Nederlanden van prehistorie tot heden, 1, Leuven and Paris: Peeters, 1998. 105–122.
Toorians, Lauran, “Vlaamse nederzettingen in Keltische gebieden”, in: Lauran Toorians (ed.), Kelten en de Nederlanden van prehistorie tot heden, 1, Leuven and Paris: Peeters, 1998. 69–88.
Toorians, Lauran, “French loan-words containing nasal vowels in Middle Cornish”, in: Alexander Lubotsky (ed.), Sound law and analogy: papers in honor of Robert S. P. Beekes on the occasion of his 60th birthday, Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodopi, 1997. 327–332.
Toorians, Lauran, “Twelfth-century Flemish settlements in Scotland”, in: Grant G. Simpson (ed.), Scotland and the Low Countries 1124-1994, 3, East Linton: University of Aberdeen, 1996. 1–14.
Veelenturf, Kees, and Lauran Toorians [ed.], “Anton Gerard van Hamel, ‘Keltische beeldspraak’”, in: Mick van Rootseler, Nicki Bullinga, Erwin Matheeuwsen, and Lauran Toorians (eds), Vijf jaar Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies: lustrumuitgave, Utrecht: Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies, 1995. 19–29.
Toorians, Lauran, “Betekenis en oorsprong van de naam Magusanus”, in: Nico Roymans, and Ton Derks (eds), De tempel van Empel: een Hercules-heiligdom in het woongebied van de Bataven, 2, ’s-Hertogenbosch: Stichting Brabantse Regionale Geschiedbeoefening, Stichting Archeologie en Bouwhistorie ’s-Hertogenbosch en Omgeving, 1994. 108–110.
Toorians, Lauran, “Kelten en Keltisch”, in: Kees Veelenturf (ed.), Kelten & keltologen: inleidingen over de Keltische talen en hun letterkunde, met een catalogus, Amsterdam: Gerard Timmer Prods, 1993. 7–14.