Bibliography

Kim R.
McCone
s. xx / s. xxi

52 publications between 1978 and 2015 indexed
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Works authored

McCone, Kim R., The origins and development of the insular Celtic verbal complex, Maynooth Studies in Celtic Linguistics 6, Maynooth: Department of Old Irish, National University of Ireland, 2006.
McCone, Kim, A first Old Irish grammar and reader: including an introduction to Middle Irish, Maynooth Medieval Irish Texts 3, Maynooth: Department of Old and Middle Irish, 2005.
includes: Kim R. McCone, ‘Preliminaries’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The noun, adjective and article’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The verb ‘to be’ and word order’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘Pronouns, prepositions and numerals’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The present stem, simple and compound verbs, object pronouns’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The preterite active stem and the relative markers’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The passive and the deponent’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The subjunctive stem’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The future stem’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘The augment’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘Further reading’ • Kim R. McCone, ‘A basic introduction to Middle Irish
McCone, Kim [ed. and tr.], Echtrae Chonnlai and the beginnings of vernacular narrative writing in Ireland, Maynooth Medieval Irish Texts 1, Maynooth: Department of Old and Middle Irish, National University of Ireland, 2000.
McCone, Kim, The early Irish verb, Maynooth Monographs 1, 2nd ed. (1987), Maynooth: An Sagart, 1997.
McCone, Kim R., Towards a relative chronology of ancient and medieval Celtic sound change, Maynooth Studies in Celtic Linguistics 1, Maynooth: Department of Old Irish, St. Patrick’s College, 1996.
McCone, Kim R., and Pádraig Ó Fiannachta (trs.), Scéalaíocht ár sinsear, Dán agus Tallann 3, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1992.  
A collection of early Irish tales in a Modern Irish translation.
A collection of early Irish tales in a Modern Irish translation.
McCone, Kim, The Indo-European origins of the Old Irish nasal presents, subjunctives and futures, Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Sprachwissenschaft 66, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachwissenschaft der Universität Innsbruck, 1991.
McCone, Kim R., Pagan past and Christian present in early Irish literature, Maynooth Monographs 3, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1990.
McCone, Kim, The early Irish verb, Maynooth Monographs 1, 1st ed., Maynooth: An Sagart, 1987.

Websites

MacShamhráin, Ailbhe, Nora White, Aidan Breen, and Kim R. McCone, Monasticon Hibernicum: early Christian ecclesiastical settlement in Ireland, 5th to 12th centuries, Online: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Celtic Studies. URL: <https://monasticon.celt.dias.ie>.

Works edited

McCone, Kim R., and Katharine Simms (eds.), Progress in medieval Irish studies, Maynooth: Department of Old Irish, St. Patrick's College, 1996.
Ó Corráin, Donnchadh, Liam Breatnach, and Kim R. McCone (eds), Sages, saints and storytellers: Celtic studies in honour of Professor James Carney, Maynooth Monographs 2, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1989.

Contributions to journals

McCone, Kim, “Kochen”, Die Sprache 48 (2009, 2010): 107–111.
McCone, Kim, “Greek Κελτός and Γαλάτης, Latin Gallus ‘Gaul’”, Die Sprache 46 (2006, 2008): 94–111.
McCone, Kim, “Die Spottwettkämpfe in der Geschichte von Mac Da Thós Schwein”, Keltische Forschungen 1 (2006): 149–161.
McCone, Kim, “OIr. senchae, senchaid and preliminaries on agent noun formation in Celtic”, Ériu 46 (1995): 1–10.
McCone, Kim R., “OIr. aub ‘river’ and amnair ‘maternal uncle’”, Münchener Studien zur Sprachwissenschaft 53 (1992): 101–111.
McCone, Kim R., “Varia I: The etymology of Old Irish déis ‘client(s)’”, Ériu 43 (1992): 193–197.
McCone, Kim R., “OIr. torc, Av. ϑβərəsō < PIE *twork̑ós ‘(cutter,) boar’”, Münchener Studien zur Sprachwissenschaft 53 (1992): 99–100.
McCone, Kim, “OIr. -ic ‘reaches’, ithid ‘eats’, rigid ‘stretches, directs, rules’ and the PIE ‘Narten’ present in Celtic”, Ériu 42 (1991): 1–11.
McCone, Kim, “The inflection of OIr. ‘cow’ and the etymology of Buchet”, Ériu 42 (1991): 37–44.
McCone, Kim R., “Dubthach maccu Lugair and a matter of life and death in the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas Már”, Peritia 5 (1986): 1–35.  
abstract:
The three extant versions of the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas Már share an original core best preserved in the Harley recension. Its centre-piece, an archaising poem ascribed to Dubthach maccu Lugair, stands revealed in translation as a sophisticated scripturally-based argument for punishment of culpable homicide by death in spite of the christian doctrine of forgiveness. As such, it is integrally bound up with the surrounding prose ascribing the foundation of early Irish law to the fusion of native legal with imported biblical concepts under clerical auspices symbolized by St Patrick. Despite its bogus appearance as commentary, the prose must be contemporary with the poem, which is unlikely to be post-eighth-century on linguistic and stylistic grounds but is hardly much older either on the evidence that Muirchú’s Life of St Patrick was its main source. This earlier dating of the prologue goes hand in hand with further evidence for the recent revolutionary contention that so-called rosc composition is not necessarily an archaic, oral and pagan phenomenon but could be produced by clerics working from written Latin sources as late as the eighth century. An annotated text of Dubthach’s rosc concludes the discussion.
abstract:
The three extant versions of the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas Már share an original core best preserved in the Harley recension. Its centre-piece, an archaising poem ascribed to Dubthach maccu Lugair, stands revealed in translation as a sophisticated scripturally-based argument for punishment of culpable homicide by death in spite of the christian doctrine of forgiveness. As such, it is integrally bound up with the surrounding prose ascribing the foundation of early Irish law to the fusion of native legal with imported biblical concepts under clerical auspices symbolized by St Patrick. Despite its bogus appearance as commentary, the prose must be contemporary with the poem, which is unlikely to be post-eighth-century on linguistic and stylistic grounds but is hardly much older either on the evidence that Muirchú’s Life of St Patrick was its main source. This earlier dating of the prologue goes hand in hand with further evidence for the recent revolutionary contention that so-called rosc composition is not necessarily an archaic, oral and pagan phenomenon but could be produced by clerics working from written Latin sources as late as the eighth century. An annotated text of Dubthach’s rosc concludes the discussion.
McCone, Kim R., “Werewolves, cyclopes, díberga and fíanna: juvenile delinquency in early Ireland”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 12 (Winter, 1986): 1–22.
McCone, Kim, “Aided Cheltchair maic Uthechair: hounds, heroes and hospitallers in early Irish myth and story”, Ériu 35 (1984): 1–30.
McCone, Kim R., “Notes on the text and authorship of the early Irish bee-laws”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 8 (Winter, 1984): 45–50.
McCone, Kim R., “Brigit in the seventh century: a saint with three lives?”, Peritia 1 (1982): 107–145.
McCone, Kim, “Pretonic preverbs and the absolute verbal endings in Old Irish”, Ériu 30 (1979): 1–34.
McCone, Kim, “The dative singular of Old Irish consonant stems”, Ériu 29 (1978): 26–38.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

McCone, Kim, “Unstressed vowels and consonant quality in Old Irish: u or non-u?”, in: Breatnach, Liam, Ruairí Ó hUiginn, Damian McManus, and Katharine Simms (eds), Proceedings of the XIV International Congress of Celtic Studies, held in Maynooth University, 1–5 August 2011, Dublin: School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2015. 109–135.
McCone, Kim, “A brief ornithology of sex”, in: Henley, Georgia [ed.], Paul Russell [ed.], and Joseph F. Eska [assist ed.], Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature: studies in honor of Daniel F. Melia, CSANA Yearbook 11–12, Hamilton, NY: Colgate University Press, 2014. 108–113.
McCone, Kim, “The Celts: questions of nomenclature and identity”, in: Ronan, Patricia [ed.], Ireland and its contacts / L'Irlande et ses contacts, Cahiers du CLSL 38, Lausanne: Centre de linguistique et des sciences du langage, 2013. 19–36.
McCone, Kim, “The Celtic and Indo-European origins of the fían”, in: Arbuthnot, Sharon J., and Geraldine Parsons (eds.), The Gaelic Finn tradition, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2012. 14–30.
McCone, Kim, “Old Irish do·uccai, do·ratai”, in: Eichner, Heiner, Hans Christian Luschützky, and Velizar Sadovski [ass. ed.] (eds), Compositiones indogermanicae: in memoriam Jochem Schindler, Prague: Enigma, 1999. 355–364.
McCone, Kim, “‘Double nasal’ presents in Celtic, and Old Irish léicid ‘leaves’”, in: Jasanoff, Jay H., H. Craig Melchert, and Lisi Oliver (eds.), Mír curad: studies in honor of Calvert Watkins, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachwissenschaft, University of Innsbruck, 1998. 465–476.
McCone, Kim, “Prehistoric, Old and Middle Irish”, in: McCone, Kim R., and Katharine Simms (eds.), Progress in medieval Irish studies, Maynooth: Department of Old Irish, St. Patrick's College, 1996. 7–53.
McCone, Kim R., “Der Teller von Lezoux”, in: Meid, Wolfgang, and Peter Anreiter (eds), Die grösseren altkeltischen Sprachdenkmäler: Akten des Kolloquiums Innsbruck, 29. April-3. Mai 1993, Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Kulturwissenschaft, Sonderheft 95, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachwissenschaft der Universität Innsbruck, 1996. 107–117.
McCone, Kim, “Cúlra Ind-Eorpach na Féinne”, in: Ó Fiannachta, Pádraig (ed.), An fhiannaíocht, Léachtaí Cholm Cille 25, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1995. 7–29.
McCone, Kim, “The etymology of Old Irish torc ‘boar’”, in: Brogyanyi, Bela, and Reiner Lipp (eds), Comparative-historical linguistics: Indo-European and Finno-Ugric. Papers in honor of Oswald Szemerényi III, Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 97, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1993. 291–292.
McCone, Kim R., “Zur Frage der Register im frühen Irischen”, in: Tranter, Stephen N., and Hildegard L. C. Tristram (eds.), Early Irish literature — media and communication / Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit in der frühen irischen Literatur, ScriptOralia 10, Tübingen: Narr, 1989. 57–97.
McCone, Kim, “A tale of two ditties: poet and satirist in Cath Maige Tuired”, in: Ó Corráin, Donnchadh, Liam Breatnach, and Kim R. McCone (eds), Sages, saints and storytellers: Celtic studies in honour of Professor James Carney, Maynooth Monographs 2, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1989. 122–143.