Petrovskaia, Natalia





Bibliography

Petrovskaia, Natalia, Medieval Welsh perceptions of the Orient, Cursor Mundi 21, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. xxxv + 241 pp.

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Citation details
Contributor(s)
Work
Medieval Welsh perceptions of the Orient
Place
Turnhout
Publisher
Brepols
Year
2015
Series
Number of pages
xxxv + 241
Description
Abstract (cited)
This book introduces a new theoretical framework for the examination of medieval Western European perceptions of the Orient. Through the application of the medieval concept of translatio studii et imperii, it proposes the identification of three distinct conceptions of the Orient in medieval sources: Biblical, Classical, and Contemporary. Welsh textual material from the twelfth and thirteenth centuries is used as a case-study to develop and illustrate this theory. This study brings historical sources to bear on previously unexplained literary phenomena and it examines the evolution of texts and ideas in the process of transmission and translation. The sources analysed here include vernacular and Latin texts produced in Wales, as well as material that has been translated into Welsh such as Imago mundi and legends about Charlemagne. It thus combines an important and much-needed account of the development of Welsh attitudes to the East with a unique analysis of Oriental references across an extensive literary corpus.
(source: Brepols)
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Subjects and topics
Sources
Texts
Manuscripts
Poppe (Erich), “Foreword”
Acknowledgments
“Introduction”
Part I: Sources of information
[I/ch 1] “Theory: Geography, translatio studii et imperii and the Three Orients”
[I/ch 2] “Travel and contact: chronicle evidence”
[I/ch 3] “Legend: the Charlemagne material in Wales”
[I] “Conclusion to Part I”
Part II: the impact on literature
[II/ch 4] “Speaking of India: Alexander, Culhwch, and Peredur”
[II/ch 5] “Christians versus pagans: Peredur and Owain in strange lands”
[II] “Conclusion to Part II”
Bibliography; Index.
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
Page created
December 2015, last updated: September 2021