Texts

Annals of Clonenagh

  • prose
  • Irish annals
  • extent: fragmentary

A largely lost set of annals associated with the monastery of Cluain Eidnech (Clonenagh) in present-day Co. Laois.

Manuscripts

Lost.

Provenance
Provenance: Ireland
Ireland
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Clúain Eidnech
Clúain Eidnech ... Clonenagh
County Laois
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Form
prose (primary)
Textual relationships
A version of the Annals of Clonenagh are cited in the second book of Keating’s Foras feasa ar Éirinn. Joan Radner has argued that the Fragmentary annals of Ireland and the Mionannála may ultimately derive, at least in part, from the same annals.(1)n. 1 Joan N. Radner, Fragmentary annals of Ireland (1978): vii–viii; xxvi note 44.
Related: Foras feasa ar ÉirinnForas feasa ar ÉirinnThe prose history of Ireland completed by Geoffrey Keating (Seathrún Céitinn) in c. 1634. Comprising an introduction, two books and appendices, it narrates the history of the island from the time of Creation to the Norman conquest in the 12th century. As set out by the vindicatory introduction (an díonbhrollach), the work was written in response to the cultural biases of Anglo-centric writers (e.g. William Camden and Edmund Spenser).Fragmentary annals of IrelandFragmentary annals of IrelandA fragmentarily preserved text of Irish annals and narrative expansions, possibly compiled in the 11th century and perhaps based on the lost Annals of Clonenagh (Radner). Five fragments now remain in a late, 17th-century transcript, each covering a part of the period between 573 and 914 and focusing on the province of Leinster.MionannálaMionannála

Classification

Irish annalsannals and chronicles, Irish histories
Irish annals
id. 35113

Sources

Notes

Joan N. Radner, Fragmentary annals of Ireland (1978): vii–viii; xxvi note 44.

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] [tr.] Comyn, David, and Patrick S. Dinneen (ed. and tr.), Foras feasa ar Éirinn: The history of Ireland by Geoffrey Keating D. D., 4 vols, Irish Texts Society 4–8–9–15, London: Irish Texts Society, 1902–1914.
CELT – edition (Book I-II): <link> CELT – translation (Book I-II): <link> Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 2: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 2: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link>
Vol. 3: 212–213, 298–299, 314–315. Keating's Foras feasa ar Éirinn.
[ed.] [tr.] Radner, Joan N. [ed. and tr.], Fragmentary annals of Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978.
CELT – edition (2–182),: <link> CELT – translation (3–183): <link> CELT – introduction (vii–ix): <link>
[ed.] [tr.] O'Grady, Standish Hayes [ed. and tr.], “Mionannala sunna: Fragmentary annals”, in: O'Grady, Standish Hayes, Silva Gadelica, 2 vols, London: Williams & Norgate, 1892. 390–413 (vol. 1), 424–449 (vol. 2).
CELT – edition: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 2: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 2: <link>

Secondary sources (select)

Flanagan, Marie Therese, The transformation of the Irish church in the twelfth century, Studies in Celtic History 29, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2010.  
abstract:
The twelfth century saw a wide-ranging transformation of the Irish church, a regional manifestation of a wider pan-European reform movement. This book, the first to offer a full account of this change, moves away from the previous concentration on the restructuring of Irish dioceses and episcopal authority, and the introduction of Continental monastic observances, to widen the discussion. It charts changes in the religious culture experienced by the laity as well as the clergy and takes account of the particular Irish experience within the wider European context. The universal ideals that were defined with increasing clarity by Continental advocates of reform generated a series of initiatives from Irish churchmen aimed at disseminating reform ideology within clerical circles and transmitting it also to lay society, even if, as elsewhere, it often proved difficult to implement in practice. Whatever the obstacles faced by reformist clergy, their genuine concern to transform the Irish church and society cannot be doubted, and is attested in a range of hitherto unexploited sources this volume draws upon.
(source: Publisher)
2–3
Radner, Joan N. [ed. and tr.], Fragmentary annals of Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978.
CELT – edition (2–182),: <link> CELT – translation (3–183): <link> CELT – introduction (vii–ix): <link>
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
Page created
June 2011, last updated: December 2021