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From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies


Results (5011)
-ch thighearna / creite ar teach na togharma (acephalous)
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... na stéad 's na nallann óir
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’Sí mo ghrádh
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2 Enoch
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A adeilo hudoliaeth
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A aingil, beir a Míchíl mórfhertaig
verse
9 st.
beg. A aingil / beir a Míchíl mórfhertaig
Máel Ísu Ua BrolcháinUa Brolcháin (Máel Ísu)
(d. (c.) 1086)
Úa Brolcháin (Máel Ísu)
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Metrical invocation (9qq, treochair) of Michael the archangel.
Middle IrishIrish prayers and hymnsearly Irish verseMichael the archangel
A aos dána is aithnidh damh
verse
9 st.
beg. A aos dána is aithnidh damh

Early Modern Irish grammatical poem (9 qq) on sealbhadh – here referring to conjugated forms of the copula and infixed pronouns – and its effects, primarily nasalisation, e.g. ‘the sealbhadh of b becomes m’ (line 5).

Early Modern IrishIrish bardic poetryIrish learning on language and style
A Athair nua neamhdhasa
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A bairgen ataí i ngábud
verse
18 st.
beg. A bairgen ataí i ngábud

Middle Irish dialogue poem (18qq) with prose epilogue in the Book of Leinster. The poem is presented as a contentious dialogue between an old woman (callech) of Leinster and a servant (gilla) of the king of Munster (Cerball mac Muirecáin), in which the latter insists on his entitlement to meals and hospitality. The prose epilogue goes on to explain the reasons for the quarrel.

Middle Irishprefaces, introductions and epiloguesearly Irish versedialogue and question-and-answer literatureLeinster/Cúige LaigheanMunster/Cúige MumhanCerball mac MuirecáinMag Dála
Tochmarc Étaíne
A Bé Find in rega lim
verse
7 st.
beg. A Bé Find in rega lim
Early Irish syllabic poem (7 qq) in which the speaker encourages Bé Find to join him in the delightful Otherworld. It is preserved in the third part of Tochmarc Étaíne, where the poem is attributed to Midir as he woos Étaín, addressing her as Bé Find.
Late Old IrishEarly Irish lyricsIrish lyrical verseearly Irish verseBé Find
A ben bennacht fort - ná ráid
verse
beg. A ben bennacht fort – ná ráid
Daniél úa LíathaitiDaniél úa Líathaiti
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.

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(ascr.)
Old IrishMiddle IrishIrish lyrical verseearly Irish verse
A ben Gráic
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A ben labhrus ruim an loach
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Buile Shuibne
A bennáin a búiredáin
verse
beg. A bennáin a búiredáin
Late Middle IrishEarly Irish lyricsIrish lyrical verseearly Irish verse
A bhaintighearna Mháire a bhláth na Raghallach n-úr ar mhéin
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A bharda Éireann an déar libh grá mo chroí
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Duanaire Finn
A bhean beir let mo léine
verse
19 st.
beg. A bhean beir let mo léine
Early Modern IrishFinn CycleGoll mac Morna
A bhean fuair an falachán
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Duanaire Finn, Beatha Cholaim Chille (Maghnus Ó Domhnaill)
A bhean labhrus rinn an laoídh
verse
13 st.
beg. A bhean labhrus rinn an laoídh
Late Middle IrishEarly Modern IrishFinn Cycle
A bhean na gcíoch gcorrsholas
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Duanaire Finn
A bhen dén folcadh mo chinn
verse
41 st.
beg. A bhen dén folcadh mo chinn
Late Middle IrishEarly Modern IrishFinn CycleOisín mac Finn
A bhen Graig is graccda sain
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A bhen Graig is graceda sain
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A bráthair ma dia seichi for iris
verse
2 st.
beg. A bráthair, ma dia seichi for iris
Two quatrains of an early Irish poem concerning Áed Dub mac Colmáin, abbot of Kildare. They are preserved as quotations in an Irish genealogical tract in LL.
Early Irishearly Irish verseÁed Dub mac Colmáin
A Brénaind abair rium sin
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Work in progress

This user interface is work in progress and requires further work to be carried out on the underlying data to become more useful. By selecting multiple filters and where this makes sense, multiple filter values, you can string together query criteria to restrict the scope of possible search results. In computer terms, this means that conditions on either side of the boolean operator AND (not OR) must be satisfied. What the present interface does not offer is integration with full-text search (which is separately served by Google) nor does it bring the kind of faceted search in which value selection in one filter (facet) automatically narrows down the scope of the others.

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Form is primarily intended to distinguish between prose and verse texts, but some other categories have been added, notably list, which is used of a variety of enumerative genres.

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To be approached with due circumspection. Termini a quo/ad quem are lower/upper bounds used for asserting that a text cannot have been composed earlier/later than a given date. Even provided that all the required reading has been taken into account, the available scholarship may not have been able to arrive at precision, may not have have reached consensus, or simply may not have had occasion to look into the matter in extenso. Because the window of possibilities can be wide, say between 900 and 1199 (which is where our in-house definition of the twelfth century ends), your search will be interpreted generously. Whether you select the 10th, 11th or 12th century, a text dated as having been composed somewhere between 900 x 1199 will turn up in the results in all three use cases.

Filter: By / Attributed to

Those who have been identified as authors or to whom particular works have been attributed in the sources.

What if appropriate information is missing?

Our datasets no doubt contain significant gaps that will have to be remedied, but this takes time. To compensate to some extent for situation, certain fallback values can be used to stand in for absent data, where possible:

  • Classification: Miscellaneous
  • Form: form undefined
  • Language: language undefined or unknown
  • Possible period: Date not defined

Some questions about possible strategies remain unsolved. For instance, should a text recorded as being written in Middle Irish but without a more precise indication of date be automatically assigned termini between 900 and 1199? But what if a modern scholar had written a poem in a decent attempt at Middle Irish? Should neo-Middle Irish get its own spot in the sunlight?