Bibliography

Dagmar
Bronner
s. xx / s. xxi

11 publications between 2005 and 2017 indexed
Sort by:

Works authored

Bronner, Dagmar, Three historical poems on Tuathal Techtmar and the bórama from the Book of Lecan, Berlin: curach bhán, 2017.  
abstract:

According to medieval (from a modern perspective entirely fictional) Irish tradition, Tuathal Techtmar is a pre-Christian king of Ireland, grandfather of Conn Cétchathach and thus ancestor of Leth Cuinn.

Two major traditions are associated with this legendary figure: his recon-quest of Ireland through a series of battles, and eventual restoration of the legitimate kingship, after a revolt of the provincial kings; and the imposition of the bórama tribute upon the Laigin, subsequently to be levied by Tuathal Techtmar's successors over a period of several generations.

The best-known sources for these traditions are the réim rígraide paragraph dealing with Tuathal Techtmar included in R.A.S. Macalister's edition of Lebor Gabála and the Bórama tale as preserved in the twelfth-century Book of Leinster (Dublin, Trinity College MS 1339).

This book adds to the available source material in providing a first edition, with translation and commentary, of the three anonymous Middle Irish poems Augaine ar n-athair uile, Teamair teach Tuathail trēin intech, and Cid toīseach dia·roibi bōroma Laigen.

The poems are solely preserved in the Book of Lecan (Dublin, Royal Irish Academy MS 23 P 2), a manuscript produced in the scriptorium of Clann Fhir Bhisigh in the early fifteenth century, there forming part of a version of the réim rígraide which is interwoven with a copy of the Bórama tale.

Both Augaine ar n-athair uile and Teamair teach Tuathail present versions of the list of Tuathal Techtmar's battles. They are complemented by a diplomatic edition of two copies, found in the same manuscript, of the hitherto unedited Old Irish poem Fland for Ērind, which also contains a version of the battle list. Cid toīseach dia·roibi bōroma Laigen and the final part of Augaine ar n-athair uile deal with the bórama matter. The texts published here bear witness to the variance of medieval traditions, differing in detail, displaying peculiarities and treating of aspects not found in the better-known sources.

abstract:

According to medieval (from a modern perspective entirely fictional) Irish tradition, Tuathal Techtmar is a pre-Christian king of Ireland, grandfather of Conn Cétchathach and thus ancestor of Leth Cuinn.

Two major traditions are associated with this legendary figure: his recon-quest of Ireland through a series of battles, and eventual restoration of the legitimate kingship, after a revolt of the provincial kings; and the imposition of the bórama tribute upon the Laigin, subsequently to be levied by Tuathal Techtmar's successors over a period of several generations.

The best-known sources for these traditions are the réim rígraide paragraph dealing with Tuathal Techtmar included in R.A.S. Macalister's edition of Lebor Gabála and the Bórama tale as preserved in the twelfth-century Book of Leinster (Dublin, Trinity College MS 1339).

This book adds to the available source material in providing a first edition, with translation and commentary, of the three anonymous Middle Irish poems Augaine ar n-athair uile, Teamair teach Tuathail trēin intech, and Cid toīseach dia·roibi bōroma Laigen.

The poems are solely preserved in the Book of Lecan (Dublin, Royal Irish Academy MS 23 P 2), a manuscript produced in the scriptorium of Clann Fhir Bhisigh in the early fifteenth century, there forming part of a version of the réim rígraide which is interwoven with a copy of the Bórama tale.

Both Augaine ar n-athair uile and Teamair teach Tuathail present versions of the list of Tuathal Techtmar's battles. They are complemented by a diplomatic edition of two copies, found in the same manuscript, of the hitherto unedited Old Irish poem Fland for Ērind, which also contains a version of the battle list. Cid toīseach dia·roibi bōroma Laigen and the final part of Augaine ar n-athair uile deal with the bórama matter. The texts published here bear witness to the variance of medieval traditions, differing in detail, displaying peculiarities and treating of aspects not found in the better-known sources.

Works edited

Bock, Franziska, Dagmar Bronner, and Dagmar Schlüter (eds), Allerlei Keltisches. Studien zu Ehren von Erich Poppe. Studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Berlin: curach bhán, 2011.

Contributions to journals

Bronner, Dagmar, “Drei Lesarten im Text von Āed oll fri andud n-āne”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 61 (2014): 1–6.
Dagmar Bronner, “Een verhaal over de schatting van Leinster: de Bóroma volgens het Boek van Lecan”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 43 (2009): 5.
Bronner, Dagmar, “Codeswitching in medieval Ireland: the case of the Vita Tripartita sancti Patricii”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 9 (2005): 1–12.  
abstract:

The following article examines the occurrence of Latin within the medieval Irish Life of Saint Patrick, the Vita Tripartita Sancti Patricii, from syntactical, lexical and functional points of view. Some tendencies for codeswitching in the text can be discerned. In accordance with Müller (1999), 'marking off' in the broadest sense can be advanced as the main function for codeswitching, though this does not provide an overall explanation.

abstract:

The following article examines the occurrence of Latin within the medieval Irish Life of Saint Patrick, the Vita Tripartita Sancti Patricii, from syntactical, lexical and functional points of view. Some tendencies for codeswitching in the text can be discerned. In accordance with Müller (1999), 'marking off' in the broadest sense can be advanced as the main function for codeswitching, though this does not provide an overall explanation.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Bronner, Dagmar, and Nathanael Busch, “Written apart and written together: placing spaces in Old Irish and Old High German”, in: Nievergelt Andreas, Rudolf Gamper, Marina Bernasconi Reusser, Birgit Ebersperger, and Ernst Tremp (eds), Scriptorium. Wesen – Funktion – Eigenheiten: Comité international de paléographie latine, XVIII. Kolloquium, St. Gallen 11.-14. September 2013, Munich: Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2015. 519–531.
Bronner, Dagmar, “Continental learning in the Middle Irish commentaries to Amra Coluimb Chille”, in: Rudolf Simek, and Asya Ivanova (eds), Between the islands – and the continent: papers on Hiberno-Scandinavian-continental relations in the Early Middle Ages, 21, Vienna: Fassbaender, 2013. 29–54.
Bronner, Dagmar, “Der kommentierte Kommentar: Schreiber M und die mittelirische Edition von Amra Coluimb Chille im Lebor na hUidre”, in: Franziska Bock, Dagmar Bronner, and Dagmar Schlüter (eds), Allerlei Keltisches. Studien zu Ehren von Erich Poppe. Studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Berlin: curach bhán, 2011. 79–96.
Bronner, Dagmar, “Die Kommentare zu Amra Coluimb Chille”, in: Karin Stüber, Thomas Zehnder, and Dieter Bachmann (eds), Akten des 5. Deutschsprachigen Keltologensymposiums, Zürich, 7. - 10. September 2009, 1, Vienna: Praesens, 2010. 33–43.
Bronner, Dagmar, “Die Historia de Enoch et Elia: eine Navigatio aus der Bretagne”, in: Gisbert Hemprich (ed.), Festgabe für Hildegard L. C. Tristram: überreicht von Studenten, Kollegen und Freunden des ehemaligen Faches Keltologie der Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, 1, Berlin: Curach Bhán, 2009. 123–140.  
abstract:
This contribution presents a German translation of a navigatio which is contained in a world chronicle written by the 12th-century author Godfrey of Viterbo. He claims as his source a prose tale recorded in the monastery of Saint-Mathieu in Finistère, Brittany. In the Historia de Enoch et Elia, a group of hundred monks sets out from Saint-Mathieu to explore the regions of the sea. After an odyssey of three years, they are directed by two golden statues to a paradisiacal mountainous island in which everything is made of gold and precious stones and where they meet Enoch and Elias. On returning home to Britanny, they find that everything has changed beyond recognition; since their departure three hundred years have passed. The Latin text of the navigatio is taken from the edition by Burkhard Gotthelf Struve (1726).
abstract:
This contribution presents a German translation of a navigatio which is contained in a world chronicle written by the 12th-century author Godfrey of Viterbo. He claims as his source a prose tale recorded in the monastery of Saint-Mathieu in Finistère, Brittany. In the Historia de Enoch et Elia, a group of hundred monks sets out from Saint-Mathieu to explore the regions of the sea. After an odyssey of three years, they are directed by two golden statues to a paradisiacal mountainous island in which everything is made of gold and precious stones and where they meet Enoch and Elias. On returning home to Britanny, they find that everything has changed beyond recognition; since their departure three hundred years have passed. The Latin text of the navigatio is taken from the edition by Burkhard Gotthelf Struve (1726).
Bronner, Dagmar, “Die Überlieferung um Tuathal Techtmar”, in: Helmut Birkhan (ed.), Kelten-Einfälle an der Donau. Akten des Vierten Symposiums deutschsprachiger Keltologinnen und Keltologen ... Linz/Donau, 17.-21. Juli 2005, Denkschriften, Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2007. 83–88.