Texts

Vita sancti Ethbini/Egbini‘The life of saint Ethbin/Egbin’

John of Tynemouth
  • Latin
  • prose

A short redaction of the vita of St Ethbin, here called Egbinus, from the hagiographic collection of John of Tynemouth.

First words (prose)
  • Egbinus in Britanniae partibus natus
Author
John of TynemouthJohn of Tynemouth
(fl. 14th century)
Johannes Tinmouthensis
English historian and hagiographer, known for having produced a chronicle, the Historia aurea, and a collection of saints’ lives, the Sanctilogium Anglia, Wallia, Scotiae et Hiberniae, which would form the basis of the Nova legenda Angliae.
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Manuscripts
Language
  • Latin
Provenance
Origin: EnglandEngland

No description available

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Form
prose (primary)
Textual relationships
(Possible) sources: Vita sancti EthbiniVita sancti Ethbini

Short, anonymous vita of St Ethbin, al. Idiunet/Idunet (in the Quimper MS), a fellow monk of Winwaloe. BHL 2621.

Related: Vita sancti EthbiniVita sancti Ethbini

Short, anonymous vita of St Ethbin, al. Idiunet/Idunet (in the Quimper MS), a fellow monk of Winwaloe. BHL 2621.

Classification

Subjects

origins of Brittany (narrative world), c. 4th-6th centuuries
origins of Brittany (narrative world), c. 4th-6th centuuries
id. 63849

The time of migration and settlememt in Brittany, c. 4th-6th century, typically associated with the founding rulers (Conan Meriadoc, Gradlon/Grallon, Guiomar/Guigemar, etc.) and early founding saints (e.g. Paul Aurelian, Samson of Dol, Tudwal/Tugdual of Tréguier, Winwaloe of Landevenneg, Brioc, Malo, Corentin of Quimper, Paternus/Padarn, Goueznou).

EthbinEthbin
Ethbinus
(time-frame ass. with origins of Brittany (narrative world), c. 4th-6th centuuries)
Saint in Brittany, of obscure origins. His vita associates him with the monastery of Tauracus (possibly in Taulé, Carantec, Finistère) and with Winwaloe/Gwenolé of Landévennec. He is also said to have been educated by Samson of Dol and to have spent the final years of his life in Ireland. Montreuil-sur-Mer possessed relics of the saint and it has been suggested that his vita was composed there.
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Sources

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] Horstman, Carl, Nova legenda Anglie: as collected by John of Tynemouth, John Capgrave and others, 2 vols, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1901.
Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 2: <link>
Vol. 1, 368–370
Nova legenda Anglie, ed. Wynkyn de Worde, London: Wynkyn de Worde, 1516.
Internet Archive: <link>
ff. cxxii–cxxiii

Secondary sources (select)

Hardy, T. D., Descriptive catalogue of materials relating to the history of Great Britain and Ireland to the end of the reign of Henry VII, vol. 1.2: From the Roman period to the Norman invasion, London: Longman, Green and Roberts, 1862.
Internet Archive: <link>
386
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
Page created
January 2023