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Kerr, Thomas R., “A comparative overview of warfare in early medieval Ireland – AD 600–800”, Emania 23 (2016): 79–93.
abstract:

This paper examines the role of warfare in early medieval Ireland in the period before the arrival of the Vikings. The approach taken compares the information available in the various annalistic records, AD 600–800, with the recovered archaeological evidence. Four archaeological indicators of warfare are considered – the defensive structures of the period; the location of the battle-site; the types of weapons used; and evidence of weapon trauma in the osteological record. The main site type is generally interpreted as a defensive farmstead; none of the 300+ battles recorded in the annals for these two centuries have been identified beyond the putative townland; few weapons that can be definitively ascribed to the seventh or eighth centuries have been found; and no mass battle-field graves have been located. Martial prowess and military victories are, however, quite clearly seen as important vindicators of an individual’s position (and also that of his subsequent lineage).

Macdonald, Philip, “Excavations at Knock Dhu Promontory Fort, Ballyhackett, Co. Antrim 2008”, Emania 23 (2016): 31–49.
abstract:

The inland promontory fort at Knock Dhu was the subject of limited excavations in 2008. This paper provides a full account of those excavations and considers the place of hillforts and promontory forts within the Later Bronze Age settlement sequence. The long-term social consequences of a phase of permanent nucleated settlement in the Later Bronze Age are also considered.

Schot, Roseanne, John Waddell, and Joe Fenwick, “Geophysical survey at Rathcroghan 2010–2012”, Emania 23 (2016): 51–59.
abstract:

Following an extensive programme of geophysical survey at Rathcroghan published in 2009, five hitherto unexplored areas were surveyed using magnetic gradiometry in 2010–12. In an area south of Oweynagat a faint circular anomaly 20m in diameter and an equally faint arc some 8m across are of possible archaeological significance. Survey between the linear earthworks known as the Mucklaghs did not reveal any definite archaeological features but examination of Cashelmanannan demonstrates this is a complex multiperiod site. East of Rathcroghan Mound and its surrounding 360m enclosure, the geophysical evidence suggests that the avenue approaching the great mound does not extend beyond the enclosure limits. An area on the northwest was also investigated but apart from a semi-circular anomaly proved to be featureless. The latter, a possible ring-ditch, does indicate the possibility of significant features adjacent to and outside the enclosure.

Gibbons, Michael, and Myles Gibbons, “The Brú: a Hiberno-Roman cult site at Newgrange?”, Emania 23 (2016): 67–78.
abstract:

Michael O’Kelly argued in 1982 that Newgrange had been left largely unaltered from the Neolithic onwards. However, recent scholarship and a re-assessment of the archaeological remains, as well as the early antiquarian sources and available aerial photography, suggest that, in addition to the long-recognized deposition of Roman material at the front of the entrance, the tomb was altered and perhaps entered as part of continuing ritual activities and deposition over several centuries in the Iron Age. Iron Age activities may have included deposition within the interior of the tomb itself, the construction of an enclosure or barrow on the summit and alterations to the profile of the mound itself. The ritual importance of Newgrange in the Late Iron Age is reflected in the Early Christian and medieval literature and the mythological and literary sources suggest strong links between Newgrange and Romano-British religious and ritual practices at Lydney near the NW coast of the Severn Estuary. There is now sufficient evidence of possible Iron Age activity at Newgrange to justify further testing of the remains from O’Kelly’s excavations between 1962 and 1975 to clarify the extent and duration of these practices.

Warner, R. B., “The linear earthwork known as ‘the Danes Cast’: early descriptions, general observations and a newly recognised extension at Newtown, Co. Armagh”, Emania 23 (2016): 61–66.
abstract:

This paper gives a brief description of the Danes Cast linear earthwork in Counties Down and Armagh, in particular the part played in its study by John Bell in about 1815. The whole earthwork is briefly described and an explanation is offered on its date and purpose. Finally a section first recorded by Bell, but since rejected, is reinstated and shown to extend the southern end of the cast.

OʼBrien, William, “Clashanimud and the Bronze Age hillforts of Munster”, Emania 23 (2016): 5–30.
abstract:

This paper presents the results of an archaeological excavation conducted in 2004–2006 at Clashanimud (Cashel) hillfort, Co. Cork. The site is typical of what Raftery (1972) termed a Class 2a hillfort, comprised here of two concentric, widely-spaced enclosures over an area of 8.9 ha. Excavation revealed important details of the hillfort defences, which are radiocarbon dated to the twelfth century BC. The site history is of particular interest, with massive wooden palisades deliberately destroyed by fire soon after construction. The Clashanimud project is part of a new investigation of Irish hillforts based in University College Cork. This research includes sample excavation and radiocarbon dating of selected Class 2 hillforts across Ireland. The results from Clashanimud are discussed in relation to three similar hillforts elsewhere in Munster. The deliberate destruction of some of these strongholds offers a new insight into the regional wars of the later Bronze Age in Ireland.

Lynn, Chris, “Some Pictish symbols: leatherworking diagrams and razor holders?”, Emania 22 (2014): 127–135.
Ó Foghlú, Billy, “Irish Iron Age horns, and the conical spearbutt of Navan: a mouthpiece investigation”, Emania 22 (2014): 99–125..
Vries, Ranke de, “The Ulster Cycle in the Netherlands”, Emania 22 (2014): 5–11.
Gosling, Paul, “The route of Táin bó Cúailnge revisited”, Emania 22 (2014): 145–167.
Baban, Gina, “Late Bronze Age pottery from the excavations at Haughey’s Fort East”, Emania 22 (2014): 49–58.
Brandherm, Dirk, “Late Bronze Age casting debris and other base metal finds from Haughey’s Fort”, Emania 22 (2014): 59–68.
McClatchie, Meriel, “Food production in the Bronze Age: analysis of plant macro-remains from Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh”, Emania 22 (2014): 33–48.
Bondarenko, Grigory, “A ‘Kshatriya Revolution’ in the Ulster Cycle?”, Emania 22 (2014): 137–144.
Mallory, J. P., and Gina Baban, “Excavations in Haughey’s Fort East”, Emania 22 (2014): 13–32.
Warner, R. B., “The gold fragments from Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh: description and XRF analysis”, Emania 22 (2014): 69–76.
Maguire, Rena, “The Y-piece: function, production, typology and possible origins”, Emania 22 (2014): 77–98.
Tsvetoukhina, Maria, Tatyana Mikhailova, and Grigory Bondarenko, “The Ulster Cycle in Russia”, Emania 21 (2013): 5–13.
Warner, R. B., “Ptolemy’s Insamnion promontory: rehabilitation and identification”, Emania 21 (2013): 29–52.
Baillie, M., and D. Brown, “A chronological framework for the period from 208 BC to AD 600”, Emania 21 (2013): 59–71.
Hunt, C. O., “Fire, rush lights and pine at Navan”, Emania 21 (2013): 41–46.
abstract:

The basal fill of the Navan ditch provides information about human activity and vegetation at an important time in the evolution of the site. Palynofacies analysis of the basal fill is characterised by thermally mature (charred) pith of the Juncus rush, together with abundant other thermally mature matter. This is a very unusual assemblage, suggesting the possibility of activity involving rush lights and fire, shortly after the completion of the ditch. Pollen analysis and fluorescence microscopy suggests that pine was a component of the vegetation at Navan and the microcharcoal includes fragments with the bordered pits characteristic of the Pinaceae. Pine was probably extinct during the Iron Age in Ireland so it is possible that at Navan was a stand of introduced pine trees

Ó Néill, John, “Lieutenant-General Alexander Campbell’s Loughnashade horn”, Emania 21 (2013): 31–34.
Coyle McClung, Lisa, “The Late Iron Age lull – not so Late Iron Age after all!”, Emania 21 (2013): 73–83.
Ginn, Victoria, “Power to the people: reinterpreting Bronze Age society”, Emania 21 (2013): 47–58.
Leenane, Mary, “Cú Chulainn’s ríastrad and related contortions”, Emania 21 (2013): 15–19.
Warner, R. B., “A lost, Iberian-style, Bronze Age gold neck-ring from near Navan, Co. Armagh”, Emania 21 (2013): 35–39.
Plunkett, Gill, “Hekla 3, environmental downturn and Irish Later Bronze Age hillfort connections revisited”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 20 (2006): 62–67.
Lynn, C. J., “Some Iron Age figure-of-eight plan structures in Ireland: problems of interpretation with particular reference to the examples from Navan Fort, Co. Armagh”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 20 (2006): 7–19.
Ford, Patrick K., “Ul na n-Ulad: ethnicity and identity in the Ulster Cycle”, Emania 20 (2006): 68–74.
Sayers, William, “Portraits of the Ulster hero Conall Cernach: a case for Waardenburg’s syndrome?”, Emania 20 (2006): 75–80.
Warner, R. B., “The Tamlaght Hoard and the Creeveroe Axe: two new finds of Late Bronze Age date from near Navan, Co. Armagh”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 20 (2006): 20–28.
Conway, Malachy, “Survey and excavation in the Navan environs with ‘Time Team’: Creeveroe, Haughey’s Fort and Ballydoo”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 20 (2006): 29–52.
Schrijver, Peter, “Early Irish Ailenn: an etymology”, Emania 20 (2006): 60–61.
Johnston, Susan A., “Revisiting the Irish royal sites”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 20 (2006): 53–59.
Ó hUiginn, Ruairí, “Oileamhain Con Cualainn: ‘Cú Chulainn’s Training’”, Emania 19 (2002): 43–52.
Alberro, M., “Celtic heritage in the North-west of the Iberian Peninsula”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 19 (2002): 75–84.
Lynn, C. J., “Navan Fort Site C excavations, May 2000. Interim report (no 2)”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 19 (2002): 5–18.
Wiley, Dan M. [tr.], “Stories about Diarmait mac Cerbaill from the Book of Lismore”, Emania 19 (2002): 53–59.
Dunlop, W., C. J. Lynn, and K. Pullin, “A note on an experimental burning at Navan, Co. Armagh”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 19 (2002): 19–23.
Warner, R. B., “A newly discovered Iron-Age ‘pendant’ from Navan”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 19 (2002): 37–42.
Gault, Andrew, “Applying Bayesian mathematics to the Navan Fort radiocarbon chronology”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 19 (2002): 25–34.
Russell, C., “Regionalism in Bronze Age Ireland”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 19 (2002): 61–73.
Hall, Allan, “A puffball from Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh, Northern Ireland, or the Armagh ‘Apple’ unmasked”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 75–76.
McCormick, Finbar, “The animal bones from the Navan Ditch”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 37–38.
Corlett, Christiaan, “Cup-and-rings, and the mapping of Haughey’s Fort: a suggestion”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 77–78.
Warner, R. B., “Keeping out the Otherworld: the internal ditch at Navan and other Iron Age ‘hengiform’ enclosures”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 39–44.
Robinson, M. E., D. Coombs, K. Maude, and D. W. Shimwell, “Early Christian inhumations on Kiltullagh Hill, Co. Roscommon”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 65–73.
Taylor, John, “The ancient Irish in classical ethnography”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 45–48.
Lynn, C. J., “Navan Fort Site C excavations, June 1999: interim report”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 5–16.
Ford, Patrick K., “The Ulaid and the Iliad, some considerations”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 49–56.
Murphy, Eileen, “Report on the osteological material from Site C, Navan Fort, Co. Armagh”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 17–19.
Allen, N. J., “CúChulainn’s women and some Indo-European comparisons”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 57–64.
Mallory, J. P., “Excavations of the Navan Ditch”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 18 (2000): 21–35.
Woodman, P. C., “The Early Iron Age of South Munster—not so different after all”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 13–19.
Avery, Michael, “When did Irish reach Ireland: a query”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 83.
Raftery, Barry, “Observations on the Iron Age in Munster”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 21–24.
Mallory, Jim P., “Mesolithic modems and fantasy sheep: a reply to Michael Avery”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 84–85.
Warner, Richard B., “Is there an Iron Age in Munster?”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 25–29.
Baillie, M. G. L., and D. M. Brown, “Further evidence confirms the twelfth century BC dendro-date from the inner ditch of Haughey’s Fort”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 45–46.
Hellmuth, Petra Sabine, “A giant among kings and heroes: some preliminary thoughts on the character Cú Roí mac Dáire in medieval Irish literature”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 5–11.
Aitchison, Nicholas B., “Late Bronze Age ritual at Haughey’s Fort: the evidence of the deposited cup-and-ring marked stone”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 31–39.
McComb, A. M. G., “The carbonized hazel nut shell fragments from Feature no. 283 at Haughey’s Fort, Co. Armagh”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 41–44.
Mallory, Jim P., and Barra Ó Donnabháin, “The origins of the population of Ireland: a survey of putative immigrations in Irish prehistory and history”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 47–81.
Sayers, William, “Contracting for combat: flyting and fighting in Táin bó Cúailnge”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 16 (1997): 49–62.
Jennings, Rachel [tr.], “A translation of the Tochmarc Treblainne”, Emania 16 (1997): 73–78.
Sadowska, Ewa, “‘Horses led by a mare’—Martial aspects of Táin Bó Cúailnge”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 16 (1997): 5–48.
Lyle, Emily, “Age grades, age classes and alternate succession: a restatement of the basis at the societal level of Indo-European symbolic partition”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 16 (1997): 63–71.
Boreland, Dorcas, “Late Bronze Age pottery from Haughey’s Fort”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 21–28.
Kvamme, Kenneth L., “Proton magnetometry survey at Navan Fort”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 83–88.
Ambos, Elizabeth L., Daniel O. Larson, Malachy Conway, and Cibbarelli Shawn, “Remote sensing surveys of Navan Fort”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 15 (1996): 15–32.
Neill, Marie, “Haughey’s Fort excavation 1991: analysis of wood remains”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 29–46.
Lynn, C. J., “That mound again: the Navan excavations revisited”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 15 (1996): 5–10.
Murphy, Eileen, and Finbar McCormick, “The faunal remains from the inner ditch of Haughey’s Fort, third report: 1991 excavation”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 47–50.
Larson, Daniel O., and Elizabeth L. Ambos, “The goals of the Navan project”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 15 (1996): 11–13.
Aitchison, Nicholas B., “Votive deposition in Iron Age Ireland: an early medieval account”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 15 (1996): 67–75.
Muhr, Kay, “The East Ulster perspective on the Ulster Cycle tales”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 51–63.
Weatherup, Roger, “Conor, Cú Chulainn and me”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 15 (1996): 33–37.
Sayers, William, “Homeric echoes in Táin bó Cúailnge?”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 65–73.
Ó Béarra, Feargal [tr.], “Táin bó Cuailnge: Recension III”, Emania 15 (1996): 47–65.
Sterckx, Claude, “A Celtic Apollo at Navan?”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 75–76.
Mallory, J. P., D. G. Moore, and L. J Canning, “Excavations at Haughey’s Fort 1991 and 1995”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 5–20.
Candon, Anthony, “Tealach Óc and Emain Macha c. 1100”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 15 (1996): 39–46.
Warner, Richard, “Navan and Apollo”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 14 (1996): 77–81.
McCormick, F., G. Cribbin, D. W. Shimwell, and Eileen Murphy, “A pagan-Christian transitional burial at Kiltullagh”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 89–98.
McCormack, Finbar, “Cows, ringforts and the origins of Early Christian Ireland”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 33–37.
Raftery, Barry, “Pre- and protohistoric Ireland: problems of continuity and change”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 5–9.
Koch, John T., “The conversion and the transition from Primitive to Old Irish, c.367–c.637”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 39–50.
Freeman, Philip M., “Greek and Roman views of Ireland: a checklist”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 11–13.
Baillie, M. G. L., “Patrick, comets and Christianity”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 69–78.
Mytum, Harold, “Across the Irish Sea: Romano-British and Irish settlements in Wales”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 15–22.
Thomas, Charles, “Cellular meanings, monastic beginnings”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 51–67.
Warner, R. B., “Tuathal Techtmar: a myth or ancient literary evidence for a Roman invasion?”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 23–32.
Mount, Charles, “Excavations at Rathdooney Beg, Co. Sligo, 1994”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 13 (1995): 79–87.
Freeman, Philip M., “Visions from the dead in Herodotus, Nicander of Colophon, and the Táin bó Cúailnge”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 12 (1994): 45–48.
Sayers, William, “Supernatural pseudonyms”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 12 (1994): 49–60.
Warner, R. B., “Emania Varia I: A. summary of the chronology of Navan”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 12 (1994): 66.
Lynn, C. J., “Hostels, heroes and tale: further thoughts on the Navan Mound”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 12 (1994): 5–20.
Warner, R. B., “Emania Varia I: B. The date of Haughey’s Fort refined”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 12 (1994): 67–69.
Warner, R. B., “The ‘Ernean House’”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 12 (1994): 21–27.
Warner, R. B., “The Navan Complex: a new schedule of sites and finds”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 12 (1994): 39–44.

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