Manuscripts
Manuscript:
Dublin, Trinity College, MS 58 (A 1. 6) = Book of Kells
  • s. viii/s. ix
Casey, Denis, Tigernán Ua Ruairc and a twelfth-century royal grant in the Book of Kells, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2020. 60 pp.  
abstract:
King-maker, land-grabber, wronged husband and vengeful man of honour — just some of the popular views of Tigernán Ua Ruairc (died 1172), the long-lived king of Bréifne (modern Cavan-Leitrim). He is so bound up with a narrative of the English invasion of Ireland that pivots around the abduction of his wife, Derbforgaill, that it is often forgotten he was also a successful king, who ruled for fifty years and presided over a rapid expansion of his kingdom at the expense of his neighbours. This study aims to reveal a king at work, by analysing a substantial grant of land in modern Co. Meath (stretching from Dulane to Slane) that Tigernán made to the church of Kells, which was originally recorded in the famous Book of Kells. His donation offered him political and military advantages, as well as an obvious outlet for his piety. In exploring medieval Irish kings’ use of land and their property-related relationships with the church, we gain an insight into why it was possible for contemporaries to hail Ua Ruairc, on his death, as ‘a man of great power for a long time’.
Mc Carthy, Daniel, “Representations of tonsure in the Book of Kells”, Studia Celtica 51 (2017): 89–103.  
abstract:

Four Insular documents from the seventh and eighth centuries show that a major controversy took place amongst the Insular churches regarding the shape of the tonsure worn by clerics. Those who followed the customs of the Roman church wore a coronal tonsures, oval or circular in plan, while those belonging to some earlier Irish and British churches wore a delta tonsure, triangular in plan. This paper critically examines six figures in the Book of Kells proposed to have been illustrated with tonsures. Three of these at ff. 32v, 34r and 273r all show Jesus with the delta tonsure. The haloed figure above the second Canon table at f. 2v is likewise shown with the delta tonsure. On the other hand, the mounted figure at f. 255v is shown with a coronal tonsure and is explicitly coupled to the words ‘unum’ and ‘peccauerat’ of Luke 17:1 and 17:3 respectively. In Luke 17:1-3 Jesus censures all those who give cause for temptation to sin, saying it would be better that they were cast into the sea with a mill-stone about their neck. Consequently, by this graphic presentation of the coronal tonsure the compilers of Kells expressed their strong disapproval of it. A sixth figure at f. 182r proposed by James McIlwain in 2008 to be illustrated with the coronal tonsure is shown in fact to represent Pontius Pilate wearing an oval cap. Thus the five illustrations of tonsure in the Book of Kells represent a graphic polemic, exalting those who wore the delta tonsure, but directed against those who wore the Roman coronal tonsure.

Carey, John, “The sea and the spirit: two notes”, in: Sheehan, Sarah, Joanne Findon, and Westley Follett (eds.), Gablánach in scélaigecht: Celtic studies in honour of Ann Dooley, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 26–37.
31–37   [Note 2] “The mice, the Eucharist, and the satirist: St Brendan and the Book of Kells”
Dumville, David N., “Charters from ‘The Book of Kells’ transcribed for James Ussher”, in: Dumville, David N., Celtic essays, 2001–2007, 2 vols, vol. 1, Aberdeen: Centre for Celtic Studies, University of Aberdeen, 2007. 233–256.
Richardson, Hilary, “Biblical imagery and the heavenly Jerusalem in the Book of Armagh and the Book of Kells”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: texts and transmissions / Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Texte und Überlieferung, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002. 205–214.
Bourke, Cormac, “The work of angels?”, The Innes Review 50:1 (Spring, 1999): 76–79.
Cains, Anthony G., “The surface examination of skin: a binder's note on the identification of animal species used in the making of parchment”, in: O'Mahony, Felicity (ed.), The Book of Kells: proceedings of a conference at Trinity College Dublin, 6-9 September 1992, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1994. 172–174.
O'Reilly, Jennifer, “Exegesis and the Book of Kells: the Lucan genealogy”, in: O'Mahony, Felicity (ed.), The Book of Kells: proceedings of a conference at Trinity College Dublin, 6-9 September 1992, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1994. 344–397.
O'Reilly, Jennifer, “The Book of Kells and two Breton gospel books”, in: Laurent, Catherine, and Helen Davis (eds), Irlande et Bretagne: vingt siècles d'histoire. Actes du Colloque de Rennes (29–31 Mars 1993), Rennes: Terre de Brume, 1994. 217–227.
O'Mahony, Felicity (ed.), The Book of Kells: proceedings of a conference at Trinity College Dublin, 6-9 September 1992, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1994.
McGurk, Patrick, “An edition of the abbreviated and selective set of Hebrew names found in the Book of Kells”, in: O'Mahony, Felicity (ed.), The Book of Kells: proceedings of a conference at Trinity College Dublin, 6-9 September 1992, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1994. 102–132.
Cains, Anthony, and Bernard Meehan, “Physical description [Dimensions and original number of leaves; The vellum; Direction of the spine of the calf; Collation; Bindings; Writing materials; The pigment and organic colours]”, in: Fox, Peter (ed.), The Book of Kells: MS 58, Trinity College Library Dublin. Commentary, 3 vols, vol. 2, Lucerne: Fine Art Facsimile, 1990. 175–227.
Fox, Peter (ed.), The Book of Kells: MS 58, Trinity College Library Dublin. Commentary, 3 vols, vol. 2, Lucerne: Fine Art Facsimile, 1990.
Mac Niocaill, Gearóid, “The Irish ‘charters’”, in: Fox, Peter (ed.), The Book of Kells: MS 58, Trinity College Library Dublin. Commentary, 3 vols, vol. 2, Lucerne: Fine Art Facsimile, 1990. 153–165.
Henderson, George David Smith, From Durrow to Kells: the insular Gospel-books, 650-800, London: Thames and Hudson, 1987.
Lapidge, Michael, “The school of Theodore and Hadrian”, Anglo-Saxon England 15 (1986): 45–72.
Law, Vivien, “The study of Latin grammar in eighth-century Southumbria”, Anglo-Saxon England 12 (1983): 43–71.
Lapidge, Michael, “Byrhtferth of Ramsey and the early sections of the Historia regum attributed to Symeon of Durham”, Anglo-Saxon England 10 (1981): 97–122.
Pelteret, David A. E., “Slave raiding and slave trading in early England”, Anglo-Saxon England 9 (1980): 99–114.
Miller, Molly, “The dates of Deira”, Anglo-Saxon England 8 (1979): 35–61.
Harrison, Kenneth, “Easter cycles and the equinox in the British Isles”, Anglo-Saxon England 7 (1978): 1–8.
Winterbottom, Michael, “Aldhelm’s prose style and its origins”, Anglo-Saxon England 6 (1977): 39–76.  
argues against the supposed Irish origins of Aldhelm’s style of prose writing
Dolley, Michael, and Christopher D. Verey, “Some Irish evidence for the date of the Crux coins of Æthelred II”, Anglo-Saxon England 2 (1973): 145–154.
Brown, T. Julian, and Christopher D. Verey, “Northumbria and the Book of Kells”, Anglo-Saxon England 1 (1972): 219–246.
O'Sullivan, William, “The Book of Kells”, in: s.n. (ed.), Great books of Ireland: Thomas Davis lectures, Dublin, London: Clonmore & Reynolds; Burns & Oates, 1967. 14–25.
Mac Niocaill, Gearóid, Notitiae as Leabhar Cheanannais, 1033–1161, Dublin: Cló Morainn, 1961.
Abbott, T. K., and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of the Irish manuscripts in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co, 1921.
Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
1–5   Abbott, T. K., “52; 58–60; 77; 574; 580; 582; 591; 804”
TCD MSS 52 (p. 1); 58 (1); 59 (2); 60 (3); 77 (3); 574 (p. 3); 580 (3); 582 (4); 591 (4); 804 (4)

Results for Dublin, Trinity College, MS 58 (0)
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