Bibliography

Ann T. E.
Matonis
s. xx / s. xxi

11 publications between 1972 and 2004 indexed
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Works edited

Matonis, A. T. E., and Daniel F. Melia (eds.), Celtic language, Celtic culture: a festschrift for Eric P. Hamp, Van Nuys, California: Ford & Bailie, 1990.

Contributions to journals

Matonis, Ann T. E., “Gutun Owain and his orbit: the Welsh bardic grammar and its cultural context in Northeast Wales”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 54 (2004): 154–169.  
abstract:

I began this study – as most studies are begun – with questions. What is the probable date of the composition of the bardic grammar? What were the circumstances of its composition? Was it originally intended as a manual of written instruction for bards whose instruction had been traditionally oral? How probable is it that a tract based on a Latin text would have been useful to Welsh bards? Why was it repeatedly copied by hand from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, long after the disintegration of the bardic orders? Might historical events or the threat to Welsh culture ensuant on such events explain – or help to explain – why it enjoyed the attentive support of the higher clergy, uchelwyr, and emergent gentry across divergent social origins and political and religious divides?

abstract:

I began this study – as most studies are begun – with questions. What is the probable date of the composition of the bardic grammar? What were the circumstances of its composition? Was it originally intended as a manual of written instruction for bards whose instruction had been traditionally oral? How probable is it that a tract based on a Latin text would have been useful to Welsh bards? Why was it repeatedly copied by hand from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, long after the disintegration of the bardic orders? Might historical events or the threat to Welsh culture ensuant on such events explain – or help to explain – why it enjoyed the attentive support of the higher clergy, uchelwyr, and emergent gentry across divergent social origins and political and religious divides?

Matonis, A. T. E., “A case study: historical and textual aspects of the Welsh bardic grammar”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 41 (Summer, 2001): 25–36.
Matonis, Ann T. E., “Textual culture and its assimilation in fourteenth-century Wales”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 576–590.
Matonis, A. T. E., “Literary taxonomies and genre in the Welsh bardic grammars”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 47 (1995): 211–234.
Matonis, Ann T. E., “The concept of poetry in the Middle Ages: the Welsh evidence from the bardic grammars”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 36 (1989): 1–12.
Matonis, A. T. E., “The Harley lyrics: English and Welsh convergences”, Modern Philology 86:1 (Aug., 1988): 1–21.
Matonis, A. T. E., “The Welsh bardic grammars and the western grammatical tradition”, Modern Philology 79:2 (Nov., 1981): 121–145.
Matonis, A. T. E., “An investigation of Celtic influences on MS Harley 2253”, Modern Philology 70:2 (Nov., 1972): 91–108.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Matonis, Ann T. E., “Problems relating to the composition of the Welsh bardic grammars”, in: Matonis, A. T. E., and Daniel F. Melia (eds.), Celtic language, Celtic culture: a festschrift for Eric P. Hamp, Van Nuys, California: Ford & Bailie, 1990. 273–291.
Matonis, Ann T. E., and Daniel F. Melia, “Bibliography: Eric P. Hamp”, in: Matonis, A. T. E., and Daniel F. Melia (eds.), Celtic language, Celtic culture: a festschrift for Eric P. Hamp, Van Nuys, California: Ford & Bailie, 1990. 345–415.