Entities

Carey (John)

  • s. xx–xxi
  • scholars
  • (agents)
American Celticist, graduate from Harvard and professor of the department of Early and Medieval Irish at University College Cork.
Carey, John, “The Enech of Dúnlaing”, Studia Celtica 55 (2021): 173–178.
Carey, John (ed.), Táin bó Cúalnge from the Book of Leinster: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series, 32, London: Irish Texts Society, 2020.
Carey, John, “The floruit of Gilla Cóemáin”, Ériu 70 (2020): 31–39.  
abstract:

That the Middle Irish poet Gilla Cóemáin was active in the year 1072 has been generally accepted on the strength of a poem attributed to him, in which this is given as the date of composition. The poet does not name himself, however, and the attribution to Gilla Cóemáin appears to depend on a heading in a single medieval copy. This article will examine the evidence afresh, comparing the poem that contains the date with other poems associated with Gilla Cóemáin in terms of metre and of historical doctrine, and attempting to determine whether there are any further indications that speak for or against his authorship.

Carey, John, “Connachta cid dia tá int ainm”, Celtica 32 (2020): 127–144.
Tuomi, Ilona, John Carey, Barbara Hillers, and Ciarán Ó Gealbhain (eds), Charms, charmers and charming in Ireland: from the medieval to the modern, New Approaches to Celtic Religion and Mythology, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2019.  
abstract:
This is the first book to examine the full range of the evidence for Irish charms, from medieval to modern times. As Ireland has one of the oldest literatures in Europe, and also one of the most comprehensively recorded folklore traditions, it affords a uniquely rich body of evidence for such an investigation. The collection includes surveys of broad aspects of the subject (charm scholarship, charms in medieval tales, modern narrative charms, nineteenth-century charm documentation); dossiers of the evidence for specific charms (a headache charm, a nightmare charm, charms against bleeding); a study comparing the curses of saints with those of poets; and an account of a newly discovered manuscript of a toothache charm. The practices of a contemporary healer are described on the basis of recent fieldwork, and the connection between charms and storytelling is foregrounded in chapters on the textual amulet known as the Leabhar Eoin, on the belief that witches steal butter, and on the nature of the belief that effects supernatural cures.
Carey, John, “Charms in medieval Irish tales: tradition, adaptation, invention”, in: Ilona Tuomi, John Carey, Barbara Hillers, and Ciarán Ó Gealbhain (eds), Charms, charmers and charming in Ireland: from the medieval to the modern, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2019. 17–37.
Carey, John, Magic, metallurgy and imagination in medieval Ireland: three studies, Celtic Studies Publications, 21, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2019.  
Ch 1: Magical texts in early medieval Ireland; Ch. 2: The spells of blacksmiths, and other matters; Ch. 3: The three qualifications of a blacksmith.
Carey, John, The ever-new tongue: In tenga bithnúa. The text in the Book of Lismore, Apocryphes (APOCR), 15, Turnhout: Brepols, 2018.  
abstract:
The Ever-new Tongue is a medieval Irish account of the mysteries of the universe, remarkable for its exotic sources and for the rich exuberance of its style. This translation, based on the definitive edition of the text, renders this remarkable work available to a wider readership. The Ever-new Tongue (In Tenga Bithnúa), composed in Ireland in the ninth or tenth century, purports to reveal the mysteries of the creation, of the cosmos, and of the end of the world, as related by the soul of the apostle Philip speaking in the language of the angels. Drawing on a multitude of sources, both mainstream and heterodox, it reflects the richness of early Irish learning as well as the vitality of its author’s imagination.

The present volume is based on the full critical edition of The Ever-new Tongue, including detailed linguistic analysis and textual notes, which appeared in 2009 in the Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum (CCSA 16). The aim here is to offer to a broader readership a translation of the oldest (and most conservative) version of the text, preserved in the Book of Lismore, together with such other parts, fully updated, of the larger study as may be of interest to non-Celticists.

Table of contents:
Abbreviations; Bibliography; Introduction; I. Recensions and manuscripts; II. Synopsis; III. Background and sources; IV. Theology; ‘The ever-new tongue’ (Translation); Appendix: Dating the text; Glossary.
Carey, John, “Time, identity and the Otherworld: a note on ‘The wooing of Étaín’”, in: Emily Lyle (ed.), Celtic myth in the 21st century: the gods and their stories in a global perspective, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2018. 23–29.
Carey, John, The Mythological Cycle of medieval Irish literature, Cork Studies in Celtic Literatures, 3, Cork: CSCL, 2018. iii + 78 pp.  
abstract:
A striking feature of medieval Irish literature is the prominence accorded to beings who are sometimes called the 'Túatha Dé' (Tribes of the Gods), and sometimes the people of the 'síde' or hollow hills: a magical race, in whom it is possible to recognise the divinities once worshipped by the pre-Christian Irish. Tales in which the 'Túatha Dé' have a central rôle have conventionally been assigned by scholars to a "mythological cycle". This book examines the background and rationale for this classification; discusses the nature of the 'Túatha Dé' themselves; and offers a survey of the tales of the 'Túatha Dé' that are attested from the Old Irish, Middle Irish and Early Modern Irish periods.
Carey, John, “Learning, imagination and belief”, in: Brendan Smith (ed.), The Cambridge history of Ireland, vol. 1: 600-1550, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 47–75.
Carey, John, “The miracle of St Patrick’s cup”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 73 (2017): 15–20.
Carey, John (ed.), The matter of Britain in medieval Ireland: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series, 29, London: Irish Texts Society, 2017. ix + 144 pp.  
abstract:
The proceedings of the eighteenth annual seminar of the Irish Texts Society held in conjunction with the Combined Departments of Irish at University College Cork in November 2016.
Carey, John, “The Grail and Ireland”, in: John Carey (ed.), The matter of Britain in medieval Ireland: reassessments, 29, London: Irish Texts Society, 2017. 29–46.
Carey, John, “The final transformation of Étaín”, Ériu 66 (2016): 31–38.
Carey, John, “In search of Mael Muru Othna”, in: Emer Purcell, Paul MacCotter, Julianne Nyhan, and John Sheehan (eds), Clerics, kings and vikings: essays on medieval Ireland in honour of Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 429–439.
Carey, John, “H and his world”, in: Ruairí Ó hUiginn (ed.), Lebor na hUidre, 1, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2015. 101–113.
Carey, John, “Three cétnada”, in: Guillaume Oudaer, Gaël Hily, and Hervé Le Bihan (eds), Mélanges en l’honneur de Pierre-Yves Lambert, Rennes: TIR, 2015. 219–235.
Carey, John, “The old gods of Ireland in the later middle ages”, in: Katja Ritari, and Alexandra Bergholm (eds), Understanding Celtic religion: revisiting the pagan past, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2015. 51–68.
Carey, John, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015.
Carey, John, “Yonec and Tochmarc Becfhola: two female echtrai”, in: John Carey, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 73–85.
Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 2, Celtic Studies Publications, 17.2, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014.
Carey, John, “The Vision of Laisrén”, in: John Carey, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 417–444.
Carey, John, “A poem on the troubles before the last days”, in: John Carey, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 2, 17.2, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 607–627.
Carey, John, “The Reichenau Seven Heavens homily”, in: John Carey, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 189–195.


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Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
Page created
March 2018, last updated: March 2022