Manuscripts
Manuscript:
Dublin, Trinity College, MS 57 (A 4. 5) = Book of Durrow
  • s. vii2/s. viii (?)
McCloskey, Laura E., “Exploring meditatio and memoria in Ireland through the Book of Durrow: manuscript illumination as the intersection of theological and artistic traditions [2018 Barry Prize Winner Précis]”, Eolas: The Journal of the American Society of Irish Medieval Studies 12 (2019): 102–111.
McCloskey, Laura E., “Exploring meditatio and memoria in Ireland through the Book of Durrow: manuscript illumination as the intersection of theological and artistic traditions”, Eolas: The Journal of the American Society of Irish Medieval Studies 11 (2018): 32–59.  
abstract:

Through a detailed exploration of decorated folios within the seventh-century Book of Durrow and a discussion of relevant liturgical literature and referential artistic material from the early medieval period, this article constructs a framework for conceptualizing how early Insular artist-scribes created and understood biblical manuscript illumination. The multifaceted nature of studying and copying liturgical texts directly reflected the popular concepts of memoria and meditatio, committing knowledge to the mind and gaining a spiritual transcendence from the transformative powers of the Word itself. The unification of text and image as exegetical literary device in the Book of Durrow reflected mnemonic and allegoric conventions that stemmed from British, Frankish, and Byzantine traditions proliferated in Ireland via the Columban monastic network. Far from being mere textual decorations, elaborately interlaced carpet pages, stylized initial lettering, and zoo-anthropomorphic motifs echoed emerging theological understanding of spiritual consciousness and demonstrated Irish monastic facility in adapting cross-cultural artistic influences.

Pulliam, Heather, “Cognition, colour and number in the Book of Durrow and other Insular gospel books”, in: Moss, Rachel, Felicity O'Mahony, and Jane Maxwell (eds), An Insular odyssey: manuscript culture in early Christian Ireland and beyond, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2017. 138–158.
Netzer, Nancy, “The Book of Durrow and the Lindisfarne Gospels”, in: Gameson, Richard (ed.), The Lindisfarne Gospels: new perspectives, Library of the Written Word 57, Leiden, Boston: Brepols, 2017. 166–182.
Bhreathnach, Edel, “Observations on the Book of Durrow memorandum”, in: Carey, John, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 14–21.
Hofman, Rijcklof, “Durrow, Book of”, in: Lalor, Brian [ed.], The encyclopaedia of Ireland, Dublin: Gill & Macmillan, 2003. 330.
Howlett, David, “The colophon in the Book of Durrow”, Hermathena 168 (Summer, 2000): 71–75.
Netzer, Nancy, “The Book of Durrow: the Northumbrian connection”, in: Hawkes, Jane, and Susan Mills (eds), Northumbria’s golden age, Stroud: Sutton, 1999. 315–326.
Werner, Martin, “The Book of Durrow and the question of programme”, Anglo-Saxon England 26 (1997): 23–39.
Meehan, Bernard, The Book of Durrow: a medieval masterpiece at Trinity College Dublin, Dublin: Town House and Country House, 1996.
Laing, Lloyd, “The provenance of the Book of Durrow”, Scottish Archaeological Review 9–10 (1995): 115–124.
Werner, Martin, “The cross-carpet page in the Book of Durrow: the cult of the True Cross, Adomnan, and Iona”, The Art Bulletin 72 (1990): 174–223.
Henderson, George David Smith, From Durrow to Kells: the insular Gospel-books, 650-800, London: Thames and Hudson, 1987.
Rössner, Corinna, Das Book of Durrow im Spiegel der Forschung zur hibernosächsischen Kunst, Schriften aus dem Institut für Kunstgeschichte der Universität München 3, Munich: Tuduv-Verlag, 1985.
de Paor, Liam, “The Book of Durrow”, in: s.n. (ed.), Great books of Ireland: Thomas Davis lectures, Dublin, London: Clonmore & Reynolds; Burns & Oates, 1967. 1–13.
Kenney, James F., “Chapter VII: Religious literature and ecclesiastical culture”, in: Kenney, James F., The sources for the early history of Ireland: an introduction and guide. Volume 1: ecclesiastical, Records of Civilization: Sources and Studies 11, Revised ed. (1929), New York: Octagon, 1966. 622–744.
630–631   [A I (b)] “455. The Book of Durrow”
Shaw, Francis, “Comments on the editio princeps of the Book of Durrow”, Éigse 10:4 (1961–1963): 300–304.
Luce, A. A. [ed.], Evangeliorum quattuor codex Durmachensis: The Book of Durrow, 2 vols, Olten: Graf, 1960.
Bieler, Ludwig, “The palaeography of the Book of Durrow”, in: Luce, A. A. [ed.], Evangeliorum quattuor codex Durmachensis: The Book of Durrow, 2 vols, Olten: Graf, 1960. 89–97.
Powell, R., “The Book of Kells, the Book of Durrow. Comments on the vellum, the make-up and other aspects”, Scriptorium 10:1 (1956): 3–21.
Best, R. I., “An early monastic grant in the Book of Durrow”, Ériu 10 (1926–1928): 135–142.
Lindsay, W. M., “Notes on two MSS from Irish scriptoriums: the Book of Durrow and the Garland of Howth”, Hermathena 18:40 (1914): 44–45.
Stokes, Whitley, and John Strachan (eds.), Thesaurus palaeohibernicus: a collection of Old-Irish glosses, scholia, prose, and verse, 3 vols, vol. 2: Non-Biblical glosses and scholia; Old-Irish prose; names of persons and places; inscriptions; verse; indexes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1903.  
comments: Reprinted by DIAS in 1987, together with Stokes' supplementary volume.
Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive – originally from Google Books: <link> Wikisource: <link>
257   “8. The notes in the books of Dimma, Durrow and Deir”
Abbott, T. K., “On the colophon of the Book of Durrow”, Hermathena 8:18 (1892): 199–202.

Results for Dublin, Trinity College, MS 57 (2)