Bibliography

Robert
Williams
b. 1810–d. 1881

4 publications between 1852 and 1907 indexed
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Works authored

Williams, Robert, The history of Charlemagne: a translation of Ystoria de Carlo Magno, Y Cymmrodor, 20, London: The Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion, 1907.
Williams, Robert, and G. Hartwell Jones, Selections from the Hengwrt MSS. preserved in the Peniarth library, 2 vols, vol. 2: containing Campeu Charlymaen, Purdan Padric, Buchedd Meir Wyry, Evengyl Nicodemus, Y Groglith, Breuddwyt Pawl, Seith Doethion Ruvein, Ipotis Ysprytawl, Lucidarius, Ymborth yr Eneit, etc., etc., London: Bernard Quaritch, 1892.  

Regarding the genesis of the work and its purpose and methods, it is worth quoting the preface from G. Hartwell Jones (G. H. J.) in full:

“The publication of the translation from the middle of the eighth chapter of Purdan Padric onwards, for which alone I am responsible, has been delayed owing to the serious difficulties encountered in its execution.

The text being in many places incomplete or inaccurate, especially in the earlier part, it was found necessary to collate Canon Willams' transcript with the manuscripts, which I was enabled to do hurriedly by the courtesy of W. R. M. Wynne, Esq., of Peniarth, or with other versions at tlie Bodleian and elsewhere, some of which I saw after the sheets had been printed off. By consulting the originals, from which these were translated in the first instauce, most of them in Latin, I have succeeded in conjecturing the first readings or tracing the growth of the mischief. These documents, written in various languages, I have discovered in English libraries or abroad, while engaged in other kinds of research. Still, many passages remain doubtful. Pages 453-6 inclusive, which were left unfinished by the late Canon Williams, have been collated with and corrected against the original MSS. by Mr. Egerton Phillimore.

A few notes have been added, but they deal with a few points only, since I have in my work chiefly followed Canon Williams in consulting rather the interests of the general reader than those versed in Old-Welsh, who will easily see why I have adopted a particular version, or how I have supplied lacunae.

The short accounts that precede them, indicating sources of information simply, with no pretence to being bibliographics, may prove useful to anyone who cares to investigate the history and variation of the tracts or legends.

It remains for me to thank Canon Silvan Evans, Egerton Phillimore, Esq., and Prof. Powel, in particular, for the assistance they have kindly rendered.

G. H. J.”

 : <link>

Regarding the genesis of the work and its purpose and methods, it is worth quoting the preface from G. Hartwell Jones (G. H. J.) in full:

“The publication of the translation from the middle of the eighth chapter of Purdan Padric onwards, for which alone I am responsible, has been delayed owing to the serious difficulties encountered in its execution.

The text being in many places incomplete or inaccurate, especially in the earlier part, it was found necessary to collate Canon Willams' transcript with the manuscripts, which I was enabled to do hurriedly by the courtesy of W. R. M. Wynne, Esq., of Peniarth, or with other versions at tlie Bodleian and elsewhere, some of which I saw after the sheets had been printed off. By consulting the originals, from which these were translated in the first instauce, most of them in Latin, I have succeeded in conjecturing the first readings or tracing the growth of the mischief. These documents, written in various languages, I have discovered in English libraries or abroad, while engaged in other kinds of research. Still, many passages remain doubtful. Pages 453-6 inclusive, which were left unfinished by the late Canon Williams, have been collated with and corrected against the original MSS. by Mr. Egerton Phillimore.

A few notes have been added, but they deal with a few points only, since I have in my work chiefly followed Canon Williams in consulting rather the interests of the general reader than those versed in Old-Welsh, who will easily see why I have adopted a particular version, or how I have supplied lacunae.

The short accounts that precede them, indicating sources of information simply, with no pretence to being bibliographics, may prove useful to anyone who cares to investigate the history and variation of the tracts or legends.

It remains for me to thank Canon Silvan Evans, Egerton Phillimore, Esq., and Prof. Powel, in particular, for the assistance they have kindly rendered.

G. H. J.”

Williams, Robert, Selections from the Hengwrt MSS. preserved in the Peniarth library, 2 vols, vol. 1: Y Seint Greal: being the adventures of King Arthur’s knights of the Round Table, in the quest of the Holy Greal, and on other occasions, London: Thomas Richards, 1876.
Internet Archive: <link> HathiTrust: <link> Digitale-sammlungen.de: <link> Digitale-sammlungen.de: <link>
Williams, Robert, Enwogion Cymru: a biographical dictionary of eminent Welshmen, Llandovery: William Rees, 1852.
Internet Archive: <link> National Library of Wales: <link> National Library of Wales: <link>


About the author

Williams, Derek R., “‘I am answerable for the Cornish’: the genesis of the Revd Robert Williams’s Lexicon-Cornu Britannicum and the significance of the Peniarth Library’s Hengwrt manuscripts in his later research”, in: Philip Payton (ed.), Cornish studies 19, 19, Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2011. 84–104..