Bibliography

Nicholas (Nicholas Jonathan Anselm)
Williams

25 publications between 1970 and 2020 indexed
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Works authored

Williams, Nicholas J. A. [ed. and tr.], Michael Everson [transcr. and facs.], and Alan M. Kent [introd.], The Charter fragment and Pascon agan Arluth, Corpus Textuum Cornicorum, 1, Dundee: Evertype, 2020.
Williams, Nicholas, Geryow Gwir: The lexicon of Revived Cornish, Cathair na Mart: Evertype, 2013.
Williams, Nicholas, and Michael Everson, Desky Kernowek: a complete guide to Cornish, Cathair na Mart: Evertype, 2012.
– errata: <link>
Thomas, Graham, and Nicholas Williams [eds.], Bewnans Ke: the Life of St Kea. A critical edition with translation, Exeter Medieval Texts and Studies, Exeter: University of Exeter Press, National Library of Wales, 2007. lxxxviii + 488 pp.
Williams, Nicholas, Díolaim luibheanna, Dublin: Sáirséal-Ó Marcaigh, 1993.
Williams, N. J. A., I bprionta i leabhar: na Protastúin agus prós na Gaeilge, 1567–1714, Dublin: An Clóchomhar, 1987.
Williams, N. J. A., Pairlement Chloinne Tomáis, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1981.
Corpas.ria.ie – Text edition.: <link>
Williams, Nicholas [ed.], The poems of Giolla Brighde Mac Con Midhe, Irish Texts Society, 51, London: Irish Texts Society, 1980.


Contributions to journals

Williams, N. J. A., “Cath Bearna Chroise Brighde”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 38 (1981): 269–337.
Williams, N. J. A., “Amhrán faoi theach striapachais”, Éigse 17:3 (Samhradh 1978, 1977–1979): 359–360.
Williams, N. J. A., “Leagan cainte in Párliament na mban”, Éigse 17:3 (Samhradh 1978, 1977–1979): 330.
Williams, N. J. A., “The source of Imthechta Ghenerodeis”, Éigse 17:3 (Samhradh 1978, 1977–1979): 297–300.
Williams, N. J. A., “A possible source for a passage in Keating’s history”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 35 (1976): 169–171.
Williams, N. J. A., “Imthechta Ghenerodeis”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 33 (1974): 128–139.
Williams, N. J. A., “Eachtra Éachtaigh Mhic Ríogh na mBan Fionn”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 32 (1972): 96–119.
Williams, N. J. A., “cara ‘to kiss’ in Middle Cornish”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:2 (1969, 1968–1970): 120.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and N. J. A. Williams, “The etymologies of diffoddi and differaf / diffryt”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:3 (1969, 1968–1970): 213–217.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Williams, Nicholas, “Some Cornish plurals”, in: Philip Payton (ed.), Cornish studies 19, 19, Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2011. 35–59.  
abstract:

This article discusses the complexities of plurals and duals in the Cornish language. Parts of the body are often referred to by dual forms - predennow, buttocks; dywron, breasts; gwelvow or gwessyow, lips; and so on - and the article goes on to reveal the wider complexities of plurals in Cornish, including those instances where the familiar plural -yon eventually gives way to -s. Here the author cites examples such as aweylers (evangelists) and poscadors (fishermen). And as he observes, detailed knowledge of such subtleties not only enhances our understanding of the historic language but serves to assist the efforts of those reviving Cornish today.

abstract:

This article discusses the complexities of plurals and duals in the Cornish language. Parts of the body are often referred to by dual forms - predennow, buttocks; dywron, breasts; gwelvow or gwessyow, lips; and so on - and the article goes on to reveal the wider complexities of plurals in Cornish, including those instances where the familiar plural -yon eventually gives way to -s. Here the author cites examples such as aweylers (evangelists) and poscadors (fishermen). And as he observes, detailed knowledge of such subtleties not only enhances our understanding of the historic language but serves to assist the efforts of those reviving Cornish today.

Williams, Nicholas J. A., “Middle and Late Cornish”, in: Elmar Ternes [ed.], Brythonic Celtic — Britannisches Keltisch: from medieval British to Modern Breton, 11, Bremen: Hempen, 2011. 237–358.
Williams, Nicholas J. A., “The preterite in Cornish”, in: Philip Payton (ed.), Cornish studies 18, 18, Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2010. 179–202.  
abstract:

Like the other Celtic languages, Cornish distinguishes an imperfect, or past habitual, tense from a simple past or preterite tense. This distinction in the Celtic languages is sometimes a cause of difficulty for English-speaking learners, because English has only one past tense. Learners sometimes use the less correct tense. The problem is compounded in the case of Cornish by the absence of native speakers and also by the relatively limited amount of traditional Cornish that survives. It is possible nonetheless by reading the extant corpus of Cornish literature to establish the preferred usage in the language of the two tenses, imperfect and preterite; and thus to decide when and where either of the two tenses is to be used in the revived language. By far the commonest person in all verbs in all texts in Cornish is the third person singular. In the texts the third person singular of the imperfect in most verbs ends in -e/-a or -y. The preterite, on the other hand, in most cases ends in either -as or -ys/-is.

abstract:

Like the other Celtic languages, Cornish distinguishes an imperfect, or past habitual, tense from a simple past or preterite tense. This distinction in the Celtic languages is sometimes a cause of difficulty for English-speaking learners, because English has only one past tense. Learners sometimes use the less correct tense. The problem is compounded in the case of Cornish by the absence of native speakers and also by the relatively limited amount of traditional Cornish that survives. It is possible nonetheless by reading the extant corpus of Cornish literature to establish the preferred usage in the language of the two tenses, imperfect and preterite; and thus to decide when and where either of the two tenses is to be used in the revived language. By far the commonest person in all verbs in all texts in Cornish is the third person singular. In the texts the third person singular of the imperfect in most verbs ends in -e/-a or -y. The preterite, on the other hand, in most cases ends in either -as or -ys/-is.

Williams, Nicholas, “Gaelic texts and English script”, in: Marc Caball, and Andrew Carpenter (eds), Oral and printed cultures in Ireland, 1600–1900, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010. 85–101.
Williams, Nicholas, “The Irish language in County Offaly”, in: Timothy P. OʼNeill, and William Nolan (eds), Offaly, history & society: interdisciplinary essays on the history of an Irish county, 11, Dublin: Geography Publications, 1998. 543–568.
Williams, N. J. A., “Pig-beans and goose-killers”, in: Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Ailbhe Ó Corráin (eds), Miscellanea Celtica in memoriam Heinrich Wagner, 2, Uppsala: Uppsala Universitet, 1997. 149–157.
Williams, N. J. A., “A problem in Cornish phonology”, in: Martin J. Ball, James Fife, Erich Poppe, and Jenny Rowland (eds), Celtic linguistics / Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: readings in the Brythonic languages. Festschrift for T. Arwyn Watkins, Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, 4.68, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1990. 241–274.
Williams, N. J. A., “Some Irish plant names”, in: Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Liam Breatnach, and Kim R. McCone (eds), Sages, saints and storytellers: Celtic studies in honour of Professor James Carney, 2, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1989. 449–462.

As honouree

Mac Amhlaigh, Liam, and Brian Ó Curnáin (eds), Ilteangach, ilseiftiúil: féilscríbhinn in ómós do Nicholas Williams = A festschrift in honour of Nicholas Williams, Dublin: Arlen House, 2012.

As honouree

Mac Amhlaigh, Liam, and Brian Ó Curnáin (eds), Ilteangach, ilseiftiúil: féilscríbhinn in ómós do Nicholas Williams = A festschrift in honour of Nicholas Williams, Dublin: Arlen House, 2012..