Bibliography

Simon
Rodway
s. xx–xxi

30 publications between 1998 and 2022 indexed
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Works edited

Poppe, Erich, Simon Rodway, and Jenny Rowland (eds), Celts, Gaels, and Britons: studies in language and literature from antiquity to the middle ages in honour of Patrick Sims-Williams, Turnhout: Brepols, 2022.  
abstract:

Celts, Gaels, and Britons offers a miscellany of essays exploring three closely connected areas within the fields of Celtic Studies in order to shed new light on the ancient and medieval Celtic languages and their literatures. Taking as its inspiration the scholarship of Professor Patrick Sims-Williams, to whom this volume is dedicated, the papers gathered together here explore the Continental Celtic languages, texts from the Irish Sea world, and the literature and linguistics of the British languages, among them Welsh and Cornish. With essays from eighteen leading scholars in the field, this in-depth volume serves not only as a monument to the rich and varied career of Sims-Williams, but also offers a wealth of commentary and information to present significant primary research and reconsiderations of existing scholarship.

abstract:

Celts, Gaels, and Britons offers a miscellany of essays exploring three closely connected areas within the fields of Celtic Studies in order to shed new light on the ancient and medieval Celtic languages and their literatures. Taking as its inspiration the scholarship of Professor Patrick Sims-Williams, to whom this volume is dedicated, the papers gathered together here explore the Continental Celtic languages, texts from the Irish Sea world, and the literature and linguistics of the British languages, among them Welsh and Cornish. With essays from eighteen leading scholars in the field, this in-depth volume serves not only as a monument to the rich and varied career of Sims-Williams, but also offers a wealth of commentary and information to present significant primary research and reconsiderations of existing scholarship.

Contributions to journals

Rodway, Simon, “The syntax of absolute verbal forms in early Welsh poetry: a survey”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 22 (2021): 33–104.  
abstract:

This paper undertakes a comprehensive survey of the syntax of absolute forms of verbs in the corpus of early Welsh poetry known as hengerdd. Comparisons are made with the syntax of absolute forms in Old Irish, in Old Welsh and Old Breton, in Middle Welsh court poetry of the twelfth century onwards, and with those found in Middle Welsh prose texts.

abstract:

This paper undertakes a comprehensive survey of the syntax of absolute forms of verbs in the corpus of early Welsh poetry known as hengerdd. Comparisons are made with the syntax of absolute forms in Old Irish, in Old Welsh and Old Breton, in Middle Welsh court poetry of the twelfth century onwards, and with those found in Middle Welsh prose texts.

Rodway, Simon, “The ogham inscriptions of Scotland and Brittonic Pictish”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 21 (2020): 173–234.  
abstract:
In this paper, I examine the evidence brought forward by Katherine Forsyth in support of the hypothesis that the 'Pictish' ogham inscriptions of Scotland are linguistically Celtic. Having examined the five most promising inscriptions minutely, I conclude that they are in fact not Celtic, and that 'Celtic-looking' sequences in them are due to coincidence. Thus, the language of this corpus of inscriptions remains unknown.
abstract:
In this paper, I examine the evidence brought forward by Katherine Forsyth in support of the hypothesis that the 'Pictish' ogham inscriptions of Scotland are linguistically Celtic. Having examined the five most promising inscriptions minutely, I conclude that they are in fact not Celtic, and that 'Celtic-looking' sequences in them are due to coincidence. Thus, the language of this corpus of inscriptions remains unknown.
Rodway, Simon, “New light on Rhys’s lectures on Welsh philology”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 77 (2019): 3–16.
Rodway, Simon, “The Mabinogi and the shadow of Celtic mythology”, Studia Celtica 52 (2018): 67–85.  
abstract:
This article looks at the implications of the fact that English translations and adaptations of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi are often presented as 'Celtic mythology' rather than as 'Welsh literature'. It looks at some of the connotations of 'Celtic' in the Anglophone world, comparing externally constructed images of Native Americans. Finally it turns to the question of whether or not echoes of pre-Christian Celtic mythology can be discerned in the Four Branches, concluding that while this is not to be ruled out, it is essentially unprovable due to lack of early evidence for Celtic myths.
abstract:
This article looks at the implications of the fact that English translations and adaptations of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi are often presented as 'Celtic mythology' rather than as 'Welsh literature'. It looks at some of the connotations of 'Celtic' in the Anglophone world, comparing externally constructed images of Native Americans. Finally it turns to the question of whether or not echoes of pre-Christian Celtic mythology can be discerned in the Four Branches, concluding that while this is not to be ruled out, it is essentially unprovable due to lack of early evidence for Celtic myths.
Rodway, Simon, “Affectionate cannibalism and the blood drinking motif in Gaelic literature”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 74 (2017): 47–65.
Rodway, Simon, “A note on the Ogham inscription from Buckquoy, Orkney”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 18 (2017): 103–115.  
abstract:
I tentatively propose a new Gaelic interpretation of an ogham inscription on a spindle-whorl from Buckquoy in Orkney. In this interpretation, the spindle-whorl would be a gift from a man to a female spinster.
abstract:
I tentatively propose a new Gaelic interpretation of an ogham inscription on a spindle-whorl from Buckquoy in Orkney. In this interpretation, the spindle-whorl would be a gift from a man to a female spinster.
Rodway, Simon, “Mermaids, leprechauns, and Fomorians: a Middle Irish account of the descendants of Cain”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 59 (Summer, 2010): 1–17.
Rodway, Simon, “Cymraeg vs. Kymraeg: dylanwad Ffrangeg ar Orgraff Cymraeg Canol?”, Studia Celtica 43 (2009): 123–133.
Rodway, Simon, “Two notes on Sanas Cormaic”, Studi Celtici 7 (2008–2009): 177–189.
Rodway, Simon, “A Welsh equivalent to the Irish fían?”, Studi Celtici 7 (2008–2009): 191–196.
Rodway, Simon, “What language did St Patrick swear in?”, Ériu 59 (2009): 139–151.
Rodway, Simon, “‘Gaulish’ megaliths in Ireland? Gall in Sanas Cormaic”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 55 (Summer, 2008): 41–50.
Rodway, Simon, “Four new Old Irish courses”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 56 (Winter, 2008): 101–104.
Rodway, Simon, “The where, who, when and why of medieval Welsh prose texts: some methodological considerations”, Studia Celtica 41 (2007): 47–89.
Rodway, Simon, “The four nations of the Britons in native tradition”, Studi Celtici 4 (2006): 195–203.
Rodway, Simon, “The date and authorship of Culhwch ac Olwen: a reassessment”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 49 (Summer, 2005): 21–44.
Rodway, Simon, “Absolute forms in the poetry of the Gogynfeirdd: functionally obsolete archaisms or working system?”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 7 (2002): 63–84.
Rodway, Simon, “A datable development in medieval literary Welsh”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 36 (Winter, 1998): 71–94.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Rodway, Simon, and Barry J. Lewis, “John Scottus Eriugena and Celtica eloquentia”, in: Erich Poppe, Simon Rodway, and Jenny Rowland (eds), Celts, Gaels, and Britons: studies in language and literature from antiquity to the middle ages in honour of Patrick Sims-Williams, Turnhout: Brepols, 2022. 1–22.
Rodway, Simon, “Culhwch ac Olwen”, in: Ceridwen Lloyd-Morgan, and Erich Poppe (eds), Arthur in the Celtic languages: the Arthurian legend in Celtic literatures and traditions, 9, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2019. 67–79.
Rodway, Simon, “Chwedlau Odo; Chwedleu seith doethon Rufein”, in: Siân Echard [gen. ed.], Robert Rouse [gen. ed.], Jacqueline A. Fay [ass. ed.], and Helen Fulton [ass. ed.] (eds), The encyclopedia of medieval literature in Britain, 4 vols, Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, 2017..
Rodway, Simon, “Two developments in medieval literary Welsh and their implications for dating texts”, in: Paul Russell (ed.), Yr hen iaith: studies in early Welsh, 7, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2003. 67–74.

Miscellaneous

Isaac, Graham R., Simon Rodway, Silva Nurmio, Kit Kapphahn, and Patrick Sims-Williams [eds.], Rhyddiaith Gymraeg o lawysgrifau’r 13eg ganrif: fersiwn 2, Aberystwyth: Aberystwyth University, Department of Welsh and Celtic Studies, 2013. Computer file.
Isaac, Graham R. [ed.], and Simon Rodway [ed.], Rhyddiaith Gymraeg o lawysgrifau’r 13eg ganrif: testun cyflawn, Aberystwyth: University of Wales Press, 2002. CD-ROM.  
Transcriptions of Welsh-language texts from 13th-century Welsh manuscripts, transcribed by G. R. Isaac and Simon Rodway, with assistance from Ingo Mittendorf, Brynley F. Roberts and D. Mark Smith. New versions were published online in 2010 and 2013.
Transcriptions of Welsh-language texts from 13th-century Welsh manuscripts, transcribed by G. R. Isaac and Simon Rodway, with assistance from Ingo Mittendorf, Brynley F. Roberts and D. Mark Smith. New versions were published online in 2010 and 2013.