Bibliography

Morfydd E.
Owen
s. xx / s. xxi

40 publications between 1968 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Falileyev, Alexander, and Morfydd E. Owen, The Leiden leechbook. A study of the earliest Neo-Brittonic medical compilation, Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Kulturwissenschaft, Sonderheft 122, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2005.
Bramley, Kathleen Anne, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds.), Gwaith Llewelyn Fardd I ac eraill o feirdd y ddeuddegfed ganrif, Cyfres beirdd y tywysogion 2, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1994.

Works edited

Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000.
Owen, Morfydd E., and Brynley F. Roberts (eds), Beirdd a thywysogion: barddoniaeth llys yng Nghymru, Iwerddon a’r Alban: cyflwynedig i R. Geraint Gruffydd, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1996.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and D. B. Walters (eds.), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986.
Lloyd, Nesta, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), Drych yr Oesoedd Canol, Cardiff: University of Wales, Cardiff, 1986.
Jenkins, Dafydd, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh Law of Women, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1980.

Contributions to journals

Owen, Morfydd E., “The doctor in the Laws of Hywel”, Transactions of the Physicians of Myddfai Society (2018): 69–80.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Meddygon Myddfai: who were they and what did they know? [reprint, 2011]”, Transactions of the Physicians of Myddfai Society (2018): 18–28.
Owen, Morfydd E., “What Welsh manuscripts tell us about medicine in medieval Wales”, Transactions of the Physicians of Myddfai Society (2018): 127–137.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Rachel Sheldon Bromwich (1915–2010)”, Studia Celtica 47 (2013): 183–187.
Owen, Morfydd, “Welsh triads: an overview”, Celtica 25 (2007): 225–250.
Owen, Morfydd E., “The medical books of medieval Wales and the physicians of Myddfai”, The Carmarthenshire Antiquary 31 (1995): 34–83.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Chwedl a hanes y Cynfeirdd yng ngwaith y Gogynfeirdd”, Ysgrifau beirniadol 19 (1993): 13–28.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Prolegomena to a study of the historical context of Gwynfardd Brycheiniog’s poem to Dewi”, Studia Celtica 26–27 (1991–1992): 51–79.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Literary convention and historical reality : The court in the Welsh poetry of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries”, Études Celtiques 29 (1992): 69–85.  
abstract:
[FR] Convention littéraire et réalité historique : la Cour du prince dans la poésie galloise des XIIe-XIIIe s.
Dès les origines la poésie galloise s’est attachée à décrire la cour du seigneur. Les descriptions du cérémonial de la cour étaient déjà devenues un lieu-commun dans la poésie des bardes professionnels à l’époque des poèmes du Gododdin, au VIe s. Ce rapport analyse surtout la poésie des Gogynfeirdd, des XIIe et XIIIe s., qui ont été appelés les «poètes de cour des princes gallois». Ils utilisent les mêmes «topoi» pour décrire la vie de cour. Les poètes mentionnent aussi des lieux particuliers : certains de ces lieux, comme Aberffraw et Cemais, ont une importance particulière dans l’histoire politique de la période. Après avoir caractérisé le Llys (la «cour») en utilisant les textes de lois, les données archéologiques et les documents historiques, l’auteur traite de quelques questions particulières, comme les poèmes dédiés aux officiers de cour, et les poèmes confirmant les documents légaux.

[EN] Welsh poetry from its earliest days has focussed on the court of the ruler. Descriptions of court celebration had already become a topos of the poetry of the official bards by the time of the Gododdin stanzas of the sixth century. This paper mainly analyzes the poetry of the Gogynfeirdd of the 12th and 13th centuries, which have been referred to as ‘The Court Poets of the Welsh Princes’. They use the same topoi to describe court life. The poets also refer to specific places. The names of some of these, such as Aberffraw and Cemais, have a significance in contemporary politics. After characterizing the llys (court) with the help of the Lawtexts, archaeological data and historical documents, the author deals with some particular questions, such as poems dedicated to court officials, or poems corroborating the legal documents.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 29, 1992: <link>
abstract:
[FR] Convention littéraire et réalité historique : la Cour du prince dans la poésie galloise des XIIe-XIIIe s.
Dès les origines la poésie galloise s’est attachée à décrire la cour du seigneur. Les descriptions du cérémonial de la cour étaient déjà devenues un lieu-commun dans la poésie des bardes professionnels à l’époque des poèmes du Gododdin, au VIe s. Ce rapport analyse surtout la poésie des Gogynfeirdd, des XIIe et XIIIe s., qui ont été appelés les «poètes de cour des princes gallois». Ils utilisent les mêmes «topoi» pour décrire la vie de cour. Les poètes mentionnent aussi des lieux particuliers : certains de ces lieux, comme Aberffraw et Cemais, ont une importance particulière dans l’histoire politique de la période. Après avoir caractérisé le Llys (la «cour») en utilisant les textes de lois, les données archéologiques et les documents historiques, l’auteur traite de quelques questions particulières, comme les poèmes dédiés aux officiers de cour, et les poèmes confirmant les documents légaux.

[EN] Welsh poetry from its earliest days has focussed on the court of the ruler. Descriptions of court celebration had already become a topos of the poetry of the official bards by the time of the Gododdin stanzas of the sixth century. This paper mainly analyzes the poetry of the Gogynfeirdd of the 12th and 13th centuries, which have been referred to as ‘The Court Poets of the Welsh Princes’. They use the same topoi to describe court life. The poets also refer to specific places. The names of some of these, such as Aberffraw and Cemais, have a significance in contemporary politics. After characterizing the llys (court) with the help of the Lawtexts, archaeological data and historical documents, the author deals with some particular questions, such as poems dedicated to court officials, or poems corroborating the legal documents.
Jenkins, Dafydd, and Morfydd E. Owen, “The Welsh marginalia in the Lichfield Gospels. Part II: The ‘surexit’ memorandum”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 7 (Summer, 1984): 91–120.
Jenkins, Dafydd, and Morfydd E. Owen, “The Welsh marginalia in the Lichfield Gospels. Part I”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 5 (Summer, 1983): 37–65.
Owen, Morfydd E., and Dafydd Jenkins, “Gwilym Was Da”, National Library of Wales Journal 21 (1980): 429.
Aberystwyth, National Library of Wales: <link>
Owen, Morfydd E., “Meddygon Myddfai: a preliminary survey of some medieval medical writing in Welsh”, Studia Celtica 10–11 (1976–1976): 210–233.
Owen , Morfydd E., “Nora Kershaw Chadwick”, Studia Celtica 8–9 (1973–1974): 319–324.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Y trioedd arbennig”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 24:4 (1970–1972): 434–450.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Llawysgrif gyfreithiol goll”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 22 (1966–1968): 338–343.
Cyfraith-hywel.cymru.ac.uk: <link>

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Owen, Morfydd E., “Two Welsh plant glossaries: an introduction”, in: Oudaer, Guillaume, Gaël Hily, and Herve Le Bihan (eds), Mélanges en l’honneur de Pierre-Yves Lambert, Rennes: TIR, 2015. 263–275.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Names for sicknesses and disease in medieval Welsh”, in: Zimmer, Stefan (ed.), Kelten am Rhein: Akten des dreizehnten Internationalen Keltologiekongresses, 23. bis 27. Juli 2007 in Bonn, 2 vols, vol. 2: Philologie: Sprachen und Literaturen, Mainz: Philipp von Zabern, 2009. 205–216.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Tân: the Welsh law of arson and negligent burning”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, Cymdeithas Hanes Cyfraith Cymru 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007. 131–145.
Owen, Morfydd E., “[Texts:] Cyfnerth manuscript X”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, Cymdeithas Hanes Cyfraith Cymru 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007. 238–257.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Some points of comparison between early Irish and early Welsh law”, in: Jankulak, Karen, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds.), Ireland and Wales in the Middle Ages, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2007. 180–200.
Owen, Morfydd E., “The Excerpta de libris Romanorum et Francorum and Cyfraith Hywel”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Paul Russell (eds), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, Cymdeithas Hanes Cyfraith Cymru 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007. 171–195.
Morfydd E. Owen, “Cantref”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (2006): 339.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Prolegomena i astudiaeth lawn o Lsgr. NLW 3026C, Mostyn 88 a’i harwyddocâd”, in: Daniel, R. Iestyn, Jenny Rowland, Dafydd Johnston, and Marged Haycock (eds), Cyfoeth y testun: ysgrifau ar lenyddiaeth Gymraeg yr Oesoedd Canol, Cardiff: University Press of Wales, 2003. 349–384.
Jones, Nerys Ann, and Morfydd Owen, “Twelfth-century Welsh hagiography: the Gogynfeirdd poems to saints”, in: Cartwright, Jane [ed.], Celtic hagiography and saints’ cults, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003. 45–76.
Owen, Morfydd E., “‘Arbennic milwyr a blodeu marchogyon’: cymdeithas Peredur”, in: Davies, Sioned, and Peter Wynn Thomas (eds.), Canhwyll Marchogyon: Cyd-Destunoli Peredur, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 92–112.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Medics and medicine”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 116–141.
Owen, Morfydd E., “The Laws of Court from Cyfnerth”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 425–477.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Royal propaganda: stories from the law-texts”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 224–254.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Noddwyr a beirdd”, in: Owen, Morfydd E., and Brynley F. Roberts (eds), Beirdd a thywysogion: barddoniaeth llys yng Nghymru, Iwerddon a’r Alban: cyflwynedig i R. Geraint Gruffydd, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1996. 75–107.
Owen, Morfydd, “The archaism of the Welsh poetic tradition”, in: Hofman, Rijcklof, C. J. Jiskoot, Karel Jongeling, Peter Schrijver, Bernadette Smelik, and Lauran Toorians (eds), Welsh & Breton studies in memory of Th. M. Th. Chotzen. Proceedings of a Colloquium organized by the A. G. van Hamel Foundation for Celtic Studies, Utrecht — Amsterdam 23-24 April 1993, Studia Hameliana 1, Utrecht: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 1995. 37–63.
Owen, Morfydd E., “The texts: iv. the ‘Cyfnerth’ text”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and D. B. Walters (eds.), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986. 179–200.
Owen, Morfydd E., “Shame and reparation: women’s place in the kin”, in: Jenkins, Dafydd, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh Law of Women, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1980. 40–68.