Bibliography

Lars B.
Nooij
s. xx / s. xxi

12 publications between 2013 and 2022 indexed
Sort by:

Theses

Nooij, Lars B., “A new history of the Stowe Missal: towards an edition of the Stowe John and the Irish tract on the Mass”, PhD thesis, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, 2021.  
abstract:

The Stowe Missal is one of the earliest surviving documents of the Early Irish church and is a key witness to the Early Irish liturgy, as well as one of the few manuscripts dating back to the Old Irish period to contain a number of continuous texts in the Irish language. This thesis investigates the origins and history of the Stowe Missal by means of a close study of the manuscript and its scribes. Chapter 1 sets out the manuscript’s contents and the makeup of its quires, and offers a detailed discussion of the Stowe Missal’s scribes. The relative order of their activities is of particular concern and it is shown that the manuscript’s Irish language texts were added to the Stowe Missal by (one of) its original scribe(s). The original purpose for which the manuscript was made is also considered. Chapter 2 examines the available evidence for the Stowe Missal’s dating and its place of origin, before considering the manuscript’s early travels. It is argued that the manuscript’s traditional dating must be reconsidered and that there are strong signs that the manuscript did not long remain where it was made. In Chapter 3, the circumstances of the Stowe Missal’s early nineteenth century rediscovery are explored by reviewing both the contemporary evidence and the more recent hypotheses for the manuscript’s history in the centuries leading up to its rediscovery. Basic editions consisting of a diplomatic transcription and normalised text of the Stowe Missal’s incomplete copy of the Gospel of John, as well as the manuscript’s Irish Tract on the Mass are presented in Appendix 1 and Appendix 2, respectively. For the latter, a new translation and full vocabulary are also included. A third appendix contains an overview of the abbreviations found in these texts.

 : <link>
abstract:

The Stowe Missal is one of the earliest surviving documents of the Early Irish church and is a key witness to the Early Irish liturgy, as well as one of the few manuscripts dating back to the Old Irish period to contain a number of continuous texts in the Irish language. This thesis investigates the origins and history of the Stowe Missal by means of a close study of the manuscript and its scribes. Chapter 1 sets out the manuscript’s contents and the makeup of its quires, and offers a detailed discussion of the Stowe Missal’s scribes. The relative order of their activities is of particular concern and it is shown that the manuscript’s Irish language texts were added to the Stowe Missal by (one of) its original scribe(s). The original purpose for which the manuscript was made is also considered. Chapter 2 examines the available evidence for the Stowe Missal’s dating and its place of origin, before considering the manuscript’s early travels. It is argued that the manuscript’s traditional dating must be reconsidered and that there are strong signs that the manuscript did not long remain where it was made. In Chapter 3, the circumstances of the Stowe Missal’s early nineteenth century rediscovery are explored by reviewing both the contemporary evidence and the more recent hypotheses for the manuscript’s history in the centuries leading up to its rediscovery. Basic editions consisting of a diplomatic transcription and normalised text of the Stowe Missal’s incomplete copy of the Gospel of John, as well as the manuscript’s Irish Tract on the Mass are presented in Appendix 1 and Appendix 2, respectively. For the latter, a new translation and full vocabulary are also included. A third appendix contains an overview of the abbreviations found in these texts.

Works edited

Ó Flaithearta, Mícheál, and Lars B. Nooij [ass. ed.] (eds), Code-switching in medieval Ireland and England: proceedings of a workshop on code-switching in the medieval classroom, Utrecht 29th May, 2015, Münchener Forschungen zur historischen Sprachwissenschaft, 18, Bremen: Hempen Verlag, 2018.  
abstract:
This book comprises the results of the workshop »Code-switching in the Medieval classroom«, which was held at Utrecht University on May 29th, 2015. The workshop was part of the research project entitled Bilingualism in Medieval Ireland – language choice as part of intellectual culture.

The stated aim of the research project as well as of this volume is to open up the rich legacy of bilingual texts from particularly Medieval Ireland to a wider academic audience interested in medieval studies, literacy, bilingualism and code-switching. The papers in this volume contribute to both the debates on medieval reception, medieval elite culture and education, as well as the theories on bilingualism and code-switching by studying the nature and function of Irish-Latin and English-Latin code-switching in a number of medieval text corpora, shedding new light on the way in which clergymen blended indigenous language and culture with late Antique Roman culture that was introduced together with Christianity.
abstract:
This book comprises the results of the workshop »Code-switching in the Medieval classroom«, which was held at Utrecht University on May 29th, 2015. The workshop was part of the research project entitled Bilingualism in Medieval Ireland – language choice as part of intellectual culture.

The stated aim of the research project as well as of this volume is to open up the rich legacy of bilingual texts from particularly Medieval Ireland to a wider academic audience interested in medieval studies, literacy, bilingualism and code-switching. The papers in this volume contribute to both the debates on medieval reception, medieval elite culture and education, as well as the theories on bilingualism and code-switching by studying the nature and function of Irish-Latin and English-Latin code-switching in a number of medieval text corpora, shedding new light on the way in which clergymen blended indigenous language and culture with late Antique Roman culture that was introduced together with Christianity.

Contributions to journals

Lars Nooij, “De Ierse handschriften in de bibliotheek van Trinity College Dublin”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 75-76 (2018): 16.
Nooij, Lars B., “The Irish material in the Stowe Missal revisited”, Peritia 29 (2018): 101–109.  
abstract:

This article explores the composition history of the Stowe Missal in order to establish when and where the Irish language material contained therein was added to the manuscript. It is argued that the Stowe Missal was likely copied in early ninth-century Tallaght and that most of its Irish sections were added by the manuscript’s original scribe.

abstract:

This article explores the composition history of the Stowe Missal in order to establish when and where the Irish language material contained therein was added to the manuscript. It is argued that the Stowe Missal was likely copied in early ninth-century Tallaght and that most of its Irish sections were added by the manuscript’s original scribe.

Lars Nooij, “An Irish-speaking island: state, religion, community, and the linguistic landscape in Ireland, 1770–1870 [Review of: Nicholas M. Wolf, An Irish-speaking island: state, religion, community, and the linguistic landscape in Ireland, 1770–1870 (2014)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 68 (2015): 14.
Lars Nooij, “Spoorzoeken in de taalgeschiedenis: prehistorisch taalcontact in Ierland”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 62 (2014): 2–4.
Lars Nooij, “Welsh ballads of the French Revolution: 1793–1815 [Review of: Ffion Mair Jones, Welsh ballads of the French Revolution: 1793–1815 (2012)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 60 (2013): 14.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Nooij, Lars B., and Peter Schrijver, “Medieval Wales as a linguistic crossroads in Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 153”, in: Michael Clarke, and Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (eds), Medieval multilingual manuscripts: case studies from Ireland to Japan, 24, Berlin, Online: De Gruyter, 2022. 55–66.  
abstract:

The manuscript known as Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 153 contains a copy of Martianus Capella’s Latin text De Nuptiis Mercurii et Philologiae. Written in Wales around 900 CE, it includes marginal annotations in Latin and Old Welsh that open a window on the spread of Carolingian educational culture to Celtic-speaking Britain. Evidence is examined here for close interaction between some of the indigenous languages of the island and the learned Latin of the schools, and even for surviving traces of the variety of spoken Latin that had been current in Britain under the Empire.

abstract:

The manuscript known as Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 153 contains a copy of Martianus Capella’s Latin text De Nuptiis Mercurii et Philologiae. Written in Wales around 900 CE, it includes marginal annotations in Latin and Old Welsh that open a window on the spread of Carolingian educational culture to Celtic-speaking Britain. Evidence is examined here for close interaction between some of the indigenous languages of the island and the learned Latin of the schools, and even for surviving traces of the variety of spoken Latin that had been current in Britain under the Empire.