Bibliography

Sven
Meeder
s. xx / s. xxi

11 publications between 2005 and 2019 indexed
Sort by:

Works authored

Meeder, Sven, The Irish scholarly presence at St. Gall: networks of knowledge in the early middle ages, Studies in Early Medieval History, London, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018.  

Contents: Preliminiaries; Introduction; Part I: Identity, wanderers, and books: 1. Irish identity at St. Gall; 2. Irishmen at St. Gall; 3. Irish books at St. Gall; Part II:  Scholarly texts: 4. De XII abusiuis at St. Gall; 5. The Collectio canonum Hibernensis at St. Gall; 6. Irish exegesis and penitentials at St. Gall; Conclusion; Manuscripts; Sources; Literature; Index.

abstract:
The Carolingian period represented a Golden Age for the abbey of St Gall, an Alpine monastery in modern-day Switzerland. Its bloom of intellectual activity resulted in an impressive number of scholarly texts being copied into often beautifully written manuscripts, many of which survive in the abbey's library to this day. Among these books are several of Irish origin, while others contain works of learning originally written in Ireland. This study explores the practicalities of the spread of this Irish scholarship to St Gall and the reception it received once there. In doing so, this book for the first time investigates a part of the network of knowledge that fed this important Carolingian centre of learning with scholarship.

By focusing on scholarly works from Ireland, this study also sheds light on the contribution of the Irish to the Carolingian revival of learning. Historians have often assumed a special relationship between Ireland and the abbey of St Gall, which was built on the grave of the Irish saint Gallus. This book scrutinises this notion of a special connection. The result is a new viewpoint on the spread and reception of Irish learning in the Carolingian period.

Contents: Preliminiaries; Introduction; Part I: Identity, wanderers, and books: 1. Irish identity at St. Gall; 2. Irishmen at St. Gall; 3. Irish books at St. Gall; Part II:  Scholarly texts: 4. De XII abusiuis at St. Gall; 5. The Collectio canonum Hibernensis at St. Gall; 6. Irish exegesis and penitentials at St. Gall; Conclusion; Manuscripts; Sources; Literature; Index.

abstract:
The Carolingian period represented a Golden Age for the abbey of St Gall, an Alpine monastery in modern-day Switzerland. Its bloom of intellectual activity resulted in an impressive number of scholarly texts being copied into often beautifully written manuscripts, many of which survive in the abbey's library to this day. Among these books are several of Irish origin, while others contain works of learning originally written in Ireland. This study explores the practicalities of the spread of this Irish scholarship to St Gall and the reception it received once there. In doing so, this book for the first time investigates a part of the network of knowledge that fed this important Carolingian centre of learning with scholarship.

By focusing on scholarly works from Ireland, this study also sheds light on the contribution of the Irish to the Carolingian revival of learning. Historians have often assumed a special relationship between Ireland and the abbey of St Gall, which was built on the grave of the Irish saint Gallus. This book scrutinises this notion of a special connection. The result is a new viewpoint on the spread and reception of Irish learning in the Carolingian period.

Theses

Meeder, Sven, “The spread and reception of Hiberno-Latin scholarship on the continent in the 8th and 9th centuries”, Ph.D. dissertation, University of Cambridge, 2010.

Works edited

Meeder, Sven, and Roy Flechner (eds), The Irish in early medieval Europe: identity, culture and religion, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.

Contributions to journals

Meeder, Sven, “Irish peregrinatio and cultural exchange”, Settimane di Studio del Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo 66 (2019): 427–451.
Meeder, Sven, “Text and identities in the Synodus II S. Patricii”, Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte, Kanonistische Abteilung 98 (2012): 19–45.  
abstract:
The tract known as the Synodus II S. Patricii is one of the earliest surviving canon law texts from Ireland. It has special significance as an early and important source of the Romani faction of the Irish Church. The work survives in two versions, and, like many Irish canonical texts, it has come to us in continental manuscripts only. In the past, the younger recension was considered to be the result of a confused continental scribe, not recognising the references to Irish circumstances. By exploring the relationships between the two recensions, and focusing on the meaning of the alterations, this article argues that the last recension was in fact the work of an early eighth-century Irish scholar, deliberately revising this particular sample of Irish canonical scholarship to appeal to a new audience.
abstract:
The tract known as the Synodus II S. Patricii is one of the earliest surviving canon law texts from Ireland. It has special significance as an early and important source of the Romani faction of the Irish Church. The work survives in two versions, and, like many Irish canonical texts, it has come to us in continental manuscripts only. In the past, the younger recension was considered to be the result of a confused continental scribe, not recognising the references to Irish circumstances. By exploring the relationships between the two recensions, and focusing on the meaning of the alterations, this article argues that the last recension was in fact the work of an early eighth-century Irish scholar, deliberately revising this particular sample of Irish canonical scholarship to appeal to a new audience.
Meeder, Sven, “Boniface and the Irish heresy of Clemens”, Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture 80 (2011): 251–280.  
abstract:
One of the few Irishmen active on the Continent in the eighth century of whom we have some information was a priest (or bishop) named Clemens. Together with the Gaul Aldebert, this peregrinus was the subject of an extensive correspondence between Boniface and the pope, which eventually led to the condemnation of both men at the Roman Council of 745. The accusations brought against Clemens by Boniface display parallels with known Irish teachings and practices, as well as other allegations leveled against individual traveling Irishmen and the Irish in general. This article closely examines the context of Boniface’s charges and introduces an additional source to the framing of his arguments. It argues that the allegations must be viewed in the context of both contemporary practices and debates in Irish church and society, and the portrayal of these Irish peculiarities in texts written in and spread throughout the mid-eighth-century Continent and Anglo-Saxon England.
abstract:
One of the few Irishmen active on the Continent in the eighth century of whom we have some information was a priest (or bishop) named Clemens. Together with the Gaul Aldebert, this peregrinus was the subject of an extensive correspondence between Boniface and the pope, which eventually led to the condemnation of both men at the Roman Council of 745. The accusations brought against Clemens by Boniface display parallels with known Irish teachings and practices, as well as other allegations leveled against individual traveling Irishmen and the Irish in general. This article closely examines the context of Boniface’s charges and introduces an additional source to the framing of his arguments. It argues that the allegations must be viewed in the context of both contemporary practices and debates in Irish church and society, and the portrayal of these Irish peculiarities in texts written in and spread throughout the mid-eighth-century Continent and Anglo-Saxon England.
Meeder, Sven, “The Liber ex lege Moysi: notes and text”, Journal of Medieval Latin 19 (2009): 173–218.
Meeder, Sven, “The early Irish Stowe Missal’s destination and function”, Early Medieval Europe 13 (2005): 179–194.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Flechner, Roy, and Sven Meeder, “Controversies and ethnic tensions”, in: Sven Meeder, and Roy Flechner (eds), The Irish in early medieval Europe: identity, culture and religion, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 195–213.  
Sections: Introduction; Columbanus as controversial figure; An Irish heretic; Ethnic tensions at St-Gall monastery; A theological controversy.
Sections: Introduction; Columbanus as controversial figure; An Irish heretic; Ethnic tensions at St-Gall monastery; A theological controversy.
Meeder, Sven, “The Irish and Carolingian learning”, in: Sven Meeder, and Roy Flechner (eds), The Irish in early medieval Europe: identity, culture and religion, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 179–194.
Meeder, Sven, “The Irish foundations and the Carolingian world”, in: Centro Italiano di studi sull’Alto Medioevo (ed.), L'irlanda e gli irlandesi nell'alto medioevo (Spoleto, 16-21 aprile 2009), 57, Spoleto: Presso La sede del Centro, 2010. 467–493.