Bibliography

Wilson
McLeod

6 publications between 2000 and 2020 indexed
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Works authored

McLeod, Wilson, Gaelic in Scotland: policies, movements, ideologies, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2020.  

Contents: Abbreviations; Acknowledgements; Introduction -- 1. Historical and sociolinguistic background -- 2. Policy, ideology and discourse -- 3. Foundations, 1872–1918 -- 4. Transition, 1919–44 -- 5. Stirrings, 1945–74 -- 6. Revitalisation, 1975–96 -- 7. Restructuring, 1997–2005 -- 8. Institutionalisation, 2006–20 -- Conclusion; Bibliography.

Contents: Abbreviations; Acknowledgements; Introduction -- 1. Historical and sociolinguistic background -- 2. Policy, ideology and discourse -- 3. Foundations, 1872–1918 -- 4. Transition, 1919–44 -- 5. Stirrings, 1945–74 -- 6. Revitalisation, 1975–96 -- 7. Restructuring, 1997–2005 -- 8. Institutionalisation, 2006–20 -- Conclusion; Bibliography.

Works edited

McLeod, Wilson, Abigail Burnyeat, Domhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart, Thomas Owen Clancy, and Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh (eds), Bile ós chrannaibh: a Festschrift for William Gillies, Tigh a' Mhaide, Brig o' Turk, Perthshire: Clann Tuirc, 2010. xxv + 494 pp.
Bateman, Meg, and Wilson McLeod (eds), Duanaire na sracaire = Songbook of the pillagers: anthology of Scotland’s Gaelic verse to 1600, Edinburgh: Birlinn, 2007.

Contributions to journals

McLeod, Wilson, “Linguistic pan-Gaelicism: a dog that wouldn't hunt”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 12 (November, 2008): 87–120.  
abstract:

Although 'pan-Gaelic' rhetoric has been a recurring theme in language movements in Ireland and Scotland since the late nineteenth century, there have been no significant efforts to bring Irish and Scottish Gaelic closer together in linguistic terms. Instead, contact between the two speech communities has been relatively limited and intranational forms of linguistic nationalism have been dominant. This article analyses some of the key debates and decisions in corpus planning for Irish and Scottish Gaelic since the late nineteenth century, showing how potential opportunities to promote convergence were overlooked and how linguistic modernization has tended to increase the divergence between the two forms. Against this historical backdrop, the article considers the extent to which the promotion of linguistic convergence would have been a realistic goal and whether such efforts would have harmed broader language revitalization initiatives in Ireland and Scotland.

abstract:

Although 'pan-Gaelic' rhetoric has been a recurring theme in language movements in Ireland and Scotland since the late nineteenth century, there have been no significant efforts to bring Irish and Scottish Gaelic closer together in linguistic terms. Instead, contact between the two speech communities has been relatively limited and intranational forms of linguistic nationalism have been dominant. This article analyses some of the key debates and decisions in corpus planning for Irish and Scottish Gaelic since the late nineteenth century, showing how potential opportunities to promote convergence were overlooked and how linguistic modernization has tended to increase the divergence between the two forms. Against this historical backdrop, the article considers the extent to which the promotion of linguistic convergence would have been a realistic goal and whether such efforts would have harmed broader language revitalization initiatives in Ireland and Scotland.

McLeod, Wilson, “Rí Innsi Gall, Rí Fionnghall, Ceannas nan Gàidheal: sovereignty and rhetoric in the late medieval Hebrides”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 43 (Summer, 2002): 25–48.
McLeod, Wilson, “The rhetorical geography of the late medieval Irish chronicles”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 40 (Winter, 2000): 57–68.