Bibliography

Chantal
Kobel

4 publications between 2015 and 2020 indexed
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Theses

Kobel, Chantal, “A critical edition of Aided Chonchobair ‘The violent death of Conchobar’: with translation, textual notes and bibliography”, PhD thesis, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Irish and Celtic Studies, 2015.  
abstract:
This thesis is a critical edition of the Old and Middle Irish versions of Aided Chonchobair ‘The violent death of Conchobar’. AC belongs to the aided category of tales of the Ulster Cycle. It has been transmitted in four recensions, A, B, C and D respectively, copies of which are preserved in a total of eight manuscripts. Despite largely diplomatic editions and translations of all four recensions of the tale having been published in The Death-Tales of the Ulster Heroes in 1906, Kuno Meyer was unaware of the existence of a copy preserved in NLS 72.1.5, and only became aware of RIA C i 2 and Laud Misc. 610 at a later date.
Tara.tcd.ie: <link>
abstract:
This thesis is a critical edition of the Old and Middle Irish versions of Aided Chonchobair ‘The violent death of Conchobar’. AC belongs to the aided category of tales of the Ulster Cycle. It has been transmitted in four recensions, A, B, C and D respectively, copies of which are preserved in a total of eight manuscripts. Despite largely diplomatic editions and translations of all four recensions of the tale having been published in The Death-Tales of the Ulster Heroes in 1906, Kuno Meyer was unaware of the existence of a copy preserved in NLS 72.1.5, and only became aware of RIA C i 2 and Laud Misc. 610 at a later date.


Contributions to journals

Kobel, Chantal, “Varium. Cú Chulainn’s battle-scars: a new interpretation of a quatrain in Aided Guill meic Carbada 7 Aided Gairb Glinne Rige”, Ériu 70 (2020): 171–176.  
abstract:

DIL s.v. forrind ‘point (of a weapon), barb’ provides three examples. One of these is taken from a quatrain preserved in the late Middle Irish prosimetric tale Aided Guill meic Carbada 7 Aided Gairb Glinne Rige (hereafter AG), edited by Stokes (1893). The word in question is found in the final line of the second couplet: ni ḟail díb ar talmain tend / crecht arna fagbaim fairrend, ‘Of them on the firm earth there is none for which I do not leave a spearpoint’, LL 12881 (trans. Stokes 1893, 423). Stokes’s translation of fairrend as ‘spearpoint’ suggests he understood it as a word consisting of for- + rind ‘a point, tip, apex’ (DIL 1 rind), an i-stem. The editors of the Dictionary suggested emending tend … fairrend to tind … fairrind, presumably on the basis that a palatalised final -nd would be expected for an acc. sg. i-stem and therefore emendation to tind would also be needed to fulfil the requirement for deibide rhyme. In this note I revisit this proposed emendation in the Dictionary and provide a new analysis and interpretation of the second couplet in AG, suggesting that fairrend has a more nuanced meaning than forrind ‘barb, spearpoint’ and that perhaps no emendation is needed.

abstract:

DIL s.v. forrind ‘point (of a weapon), barb’ provides three examples. One of these is taken from a quatrain preserved in the late Middle Irish prosimetric tale Aided Guill meic Carbada 7 Aided Gairb Glinne Rige (hereafter AG), edited by Stokes (1893). The word in question is found in the final line of the second couplet: ni ḟail díb ar talmain tend / crecht arna fagbaim fairrend, ‘Of them on the firm earth there is none for which I do not leave a spearpoint’, LL 12881 (trans. Stokes 1893, 423). Stokes’s translation of fairrend as ‘spearpoint’ suggests he understood it as a word consisting of for- + rind ‘a point, tip, apex’ (DIL 1 rind), an i-stem. The editors of the Dictionary suggested emending tend … fairrend to tind … fairrind, presumably on the basis that a palatalised final -nd would be expected for an acc. sg. i-stem and therefore emendation to tind would also be needed to fulfil the requirement for deibide rhyme. In this note I revisit this proposed emendation in the Dictionary and provide a new analysis and interpretation of the second couplet in AG, suggesting that fairrend has a more nuanced meaning than forrind ‘barb, spearpoint’ and that perhaps no emendation is needed.

Kobel, Chantal, “A note on the use of a feminine adjective following accusative and dative singular talmain”, Celtica 30 (2018): 10–13.
Kobel, Chantal, “Varia I. The use of an overt subject with a third-person verb + nota augens”, Ériu 65 (2015): 169–173.