Bibliography

Kenneth H.
Jackson
b. 1909–d. 1991

59 publications between 1933 and 1990 indexed
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Works authored

Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone [ed.], Aislinge Meic Con Glinne, Dublin: School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1990.
CELT – edition: <link>
Jackson, Kenneth H., The Gaelic notes in the Book of Deer [The Osborn Bergin Memorial Lecture 1970], Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1972.
CELT – ed. and tr.: <link>
Jackson, Kenneth H., Aneurin. The Gododdin: the oldest Scottish poem, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1969.  
English translation of Y Gododdin, with introduction and notes.
English translation of Y Gododdin, with introduction and notes.
Jackson, Kenneth H., A historical phonology of Breton, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1967.
Jackson, Kenneth H., The oldest Irish tradition: a window on the Iron Age [The Rede Lecture], Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1964.
Jackson, Kenneth H., The international popular tale and early Welsh tradition, The Gregynog Lectures, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1961.
Jackson, Kenneth H., Contributions to the study of Manx phonology, Linguistic Survey of Scotland Monographs, 2, Edinburgh: Nelson, for the University of Edinburgh, 1955.
Jackson, Kenneth H., Language and history in early Britain: a chronological survey of the Brittonic languages 1st to 12th c. A.D., Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1953.
Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone [ed.], Cath Maighe Léna, Mediaeval and Modern Irish Series, 9, Dublin: Stationery Office, 1938.
CELT – edition: <link>
Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone, Studies in early Celtic nature poetry, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1935.
Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone, Early Welsh gnomic poems, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1935.
Internet Archive: <link>

Works edited

Chadwick, Nora K., Kathleen Hughes, Christopher N. L. Brooke, and Kenneth H. Jackson (eds), Studies in the early British church, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1958.

Contributions to journals

Jackson, Kenneth H., “The date of the Tripartite Life of St. Patrick”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 41 (1986): 5–45.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Varia: II. Gildas and the names of the British princes”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 3 (Summer, 1982): 30–40.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Varia: I. Bede’s Urbs Giudi: Stirling or Cramond?”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 2 (Winter, 1981): 1–7.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Notes on the long-é future in Middle and Modern Irish”, Celtica 11 (1976): 94–106.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The date of the Old Welsh accent shift”, Studia Celtica 10–11 (1975–1976): 40–53.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Some questions in dispute about early Welsh literature and language, I: how old is the Gododdin?”, Studia Celtica 8–9 (1973–1974): 1–17.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Some questions in dispute about early Welsh literature and language, II: who taught whom to write Irish and Welsh?”, Studia Celtica 8–9 (1973–1974): 18–32.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Nora Kershaw Chadwick 1891–1972”, Proceedings of the British Academy 58 (1972): 537–549.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “[Miscellaneous notes] Old Cornish Odencole = Odyn Galch”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 23:2 (1969, 1968–1970): 116–117.
Wright, R. P., and Kenneth H. Jackson, “A late inscription from Wroxeter”, The Antiquaries Journal 48:2 (September, 1968): 296–300.  
abstract:
The inscribed stone which is the subject of this article was found in the early spring of 1967 in ploughing just inside the defences of the Roman town at Wroxeter (Viroconium), just west of the ‘Eastern Cemetery’ marked on the V.C.H. plan. As the stone is heavy it is unlikely to have been dragged any distance by the plough. It may be suggested that at a late date interments had spread inside the once-inhabited area. The latest levels at Roman Wroxeter have been totally removed or extensively disturbed by persistent ploughing. Dr. G. Webster can cite no artefacts which can be placed in the fifth century, but chance discoveries may help to fill this lacuna. Precise dating cannot be attained, but it seems possible that Cunorix as an Irish foederatus could have settled at Wroxeter in a decade early in the fifth century, though it should be emphasized that the only firm date we have is c. A.D. 460–75 when the stone was set up, as Professor Jackson estimates on linguistic grounds.
abstract:
The inscribed stone which is the subject of this article was found in the early spring of 1967 in ploughing just inside the defences of the Roman town at Wroxeter (Viroconium), just west of the ‘Eastern Cemetery’ marked on the V.C.H. plan. As the stone is heavy it is unlikely to have been dragged any distance by the plough. It may be suggested that at a late date interments had spread inside the once-inhabited area. The latest levels at Roman Wroxeter have been totally removed or extensively disturbed by persistent ploughing. Dr. G. Webster can cite no artefacts which can be placed in the fifth century, but chance discoveries may help to fill this lacuna. Precise dating cannot be attained, but it seems possible that Cunorix as an Irish foederatus could have settled at Wroxeter in a decade early in the fifth century, though it should be emphasized that the only firm date we have is c. A.D. 460–75 when the stone was set up, as Professor Jackson estimates on linguistic grounds.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Some popular motifs in early Welsh tradition”, Études Celtiques 11:1 (1964–1966): 83–99.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 11, fascicule 1, 1964: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 11, fascicule 2, 1966: <link>
Jackson, Kenneth, “Final syllables in “Pádraig” Loanwords”, Études Celtiques 9:1 (1960–1961): 79–91.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 9, fascicule 1, 1960: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 9, fascicule 2, 1961: <link>
Jackson, Kenneth, “The phonology of the Breton dialect of Plougrescant”, Études Celtiques 9 (1960–1961): 327–404.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 9, fascicule 1, 1960: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 9, fascicule 2, 1961: <link>
Jackson, Kenneth, “Linguistic geography and the history of the Breton language”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 28 (1960–1961): 272–293.
Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone, “Gemination and spirant mutation”, Celtica 5 (1960): 127–134.
Jackson, Kenneth, “The situation of the Scottish Gaelic language and the work of the Linguistic Survey of Scotland”, Lochlann: A Review of Celtic Studies 1 (1958): 229–234.
Journal volume:  : <link>
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The site of Mount Badon”, Journal of Celtic Studies 2 (1953–1958): 152–155.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The Duan Albanach”, The Scottish Historical Review 36:122 (1957): 125–137.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The poem A eolcha Alban uile”, Celtica 3 (1956): 149–167.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Some remarks on the Gaelic notitiae in the Book of Deer”, Ériu 16 (1952): 86–98.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Common Gaelic: the evolution of the Gaelic languages [The Sir John Rhys Memorial Lecture]”, Proceedings of the British Academy 37 (1951): 71–97.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Brittonica”, Journal of Celtic Studies 1 (1949–1950): 69–79.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Primitive Irish and ƀ”, Études Celtiques 5:1 (1949–1950): 105–115.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 5, fascicule 1, 1949: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 5, fascicule 2, 1950: <link>
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Arthur’s battle of Breguoin”, Antiquity 23 (1949): 48–49.
Jackson, Kenneth, “Once again Arthur’s battles”, Modern Philology 43:1 — Studies in honor of Tom Peete Cross (August, 1945): 44–57.
Jackson, Kenneth, “The adventure of Laeghaire mac Crimhthainn”, Speculum 17:3 (1942): 377–389.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Some neologisms in Blasket Irish”, Éigse 2:1 (earrach, 1940): 43–44.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “A note on the miracle of the instantaneous harvest”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 10:3 (1940): 203–207.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Some fresh light on the miracle of the instantaneous harvest”, Folklore: The Journal of the Folklore Society 51:3 (September, 1940): 203–210.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “[Nodiadau cymysg:] dyrchafu morddwyd; gofri; gwaedd; llwdn”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 9:4 (1939, 1937–1939): 319–321.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The colloquy of Llywelyn and Gwrnerth”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 21 (1938): 24–32.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Note on pedryollt bennawr”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 6:4 (1933): 313–314.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The auguries of Esdras concerning the character of the year”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 7:1 (1933): 5–14.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Jackson, Kenneth H., “The historical grammar of Irish: some actualities and some desiderata”, in: Gearóid Mac Eoin, Anders Ahlqvist, and Donncha Ó hAodha (eds), Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress of Celtic Studies, held in University College, Galway, 6–13 July, 1979, 6, Dublin, 1983. 1–18.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The breaking of original long ē in Scottish Gaelic”, in: James P. Carney, and David Greene (eds), Celtic studies: essays in memory of Angus Matheson 1912–1962, London: Routledge, 1968. 65–71.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The palatalisation of labials in the Gaelic languages”, in: Wolfgang Meid (ed.), Beiträge zur Indogermanistik und Keltologie: Julius Pokorny zum 80. Geburtstag gewidmet, 13, Innsbruck: Sprachwissenschaftliches Institut der Universität Innsbruck, 1967. 179–192.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “On the northern British section in Nennius”, in: Nora K. Chadwick (ed.), Celt and Saxon: studies in the early British border, 3, Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1963. 20–62.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The Celtic languages during the Viking period”, in: Brian Ó Cuív (ed.), Proceedings of the First International Congress of Celtic Studies, Dublin 1959, 1, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1962. 3–11.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Edinburgh and the Anglian occupation of Lothian”, in: Peter Clemoes (ed.), The Anglo-Saxons: studies in some aspects of their history and culture, presented to Bruce Dickins, London: Bowes & Bowes, 1959. 35–42.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The Arthur of history”, in: Roger Sherman Loomis (ed.), Arthurian literature in the Middle Ages: a collaborative history, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. 1–11.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Arthur in early Welsh verse”, in: Roger Sherman Loomis (ed.), Arthurian literature in the Middle Ages: a collaborative history, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. 12–19.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The sources for the Life of St. Kentigern”, in: Nora K. Chadwick, Kathleen Hughes, Christopher N. L. Brooke, and Kenneth H. Jackson (eds), Studies in the early British church, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1958. 273–357.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “The Pictish language”, in: F. T. Wainwright (ed.), The problem of the Picts, Edinburgh: Thomas Nelson, 1955. 129–166.
Jackson, Kenneth, “The British language during the period of the English settlements”, in: Nora K. Chadwick (ed.), Studies in early British history, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1954. 61–82.
Jackson, Kenneth H., “Notes on the Ogam inscriptions of southern Britain”, in: Cyril Fox, and Bruce Dickins (eds), The early cultures of north-west Europe: H. M. Chadwick memorial studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1950. 197–214.
Jackson, Kenneth, “The motive of the threefold death in the story of Suibhne Geilt”, in: John Ryan (ed.), Féil-sgríbhinn Eóin Mhic Néill: Essays and studies presented to professor Eoin MacNeill on the occasion of his seventieth birthday, May 15th 1938, Dublin: Three Candles, 1940. 535–550.

About the author

Hughes, Ian, “Nécrologie: Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson, 1909–1991”, Studia Celtica 26–27 (1991–1992): 202–213..