Bibliography

Graham R.
Isaac
s. xx–xxi

69 publications between 1993 and 2014 indexed
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Works authored

Isaac, Graham R., Studies in Celtic sound changes and their chronology, Innsbrucker Beiträge zur Sprachwissenschaft, 127, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2007. 128 pp.
Rössing, Hans, and Graham R. Isaac [ed.], Linguistic terminology in Welsh: a historical lexicon. Welsh, English, German, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie, 7, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2007.
Cousin, Georges, Llinos Dafis, Ashwin E. Gohil, Xavier Delamarre, G. R. Isaac, and Patrick Sims-Williams, Additions to Alfred Holder’s Celtic thesaurus; together with an electronically searchable version of Holder’s headwords and indexes to Joshua Whatmough’s ‘The dialects of ancient Gaul’, Aberystwyth: CMCS Publications, 2006.  
Additions to Alfred Holder’s Altceltischer Sprachschatz (1896–1913) by Georges Cousin, headwords by Llinos Dafis and Ashwin Gohil -- Indexes to Joshua Whatmough’s The dialects of ancient Gaul (1970) by Xavier Delamarre and G. R. Isaac -- Edited by Patrick Sims-Williams.
Additions to Alfred Holder’s Altceltischer Sprachschatz (1896–1913) by Georges Cousin, headwords by Llinos Dafis and Ashwin Gohil -- Indexes to Joshua Whatmough’s The dialects of ancient Gaul (1970) by Xavier Delamarre and G. R. Isaac -- Edited by Patrick Sims-Williams.
Isaac, Graham R., Place-names in Ptolemy's Geography. An electronic data base with etymological analysis of the Celtic name-elements, Aberystwyth: CMCS Publications, 2004.
Mac Coisdealbha, Pádraig, and Graham R. Isaac [ed.], The syntax of the sentence in Old Irish: selected studies from a descriptive, historical and comparative point of view, Buchreihe der Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 16, Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1998.  
New edition, with additional notes and an extended bibliography by Graham R. Isaac
New edition, with additional notes and an extended bibliography by Graham R. Isaac
Isaac, Graham R., The verb in the Book of Aneirin: studies in syntax, morphology and etymology, Buchreihe der Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie, 12, Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1996.


Contributions to journals

Isaac, G. R., “A note on the name of Ireland in Irish and Welsh”, Ériu 59 (2009): 49–55.
Isaac, Graham R., “Brittonic voiceless spirants again”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 12 (November, 2008): 17–37.  
abstract:

The controversy surrounding the phonological and phonetic prehistory of the Neo-Brittonic voiceless spirants continues. This note defends the theory that they reflect voiceless aspirated geminate stops against some recent criticism, which has, however, failed to provide an adequate account of the issues involved, and has obscured several crucial concepts and meta-concepts.

abstract:

The controversy surrounding the phonological and phonetic prehistory of the Neo-Brittonic voiceless spirants continues. This note defends the theory that they reflect voiceless aspirated geminate stops against some recent criticism, which has, however, failed to provide an adequate account of the issues involved, and has obscured several crucial concepts and meta-concepts.

Isaac, Graham R., “The verb in the Book of Aneirin: addenda and corrigenda”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 56 (2008): 119–128.
Isaac, Graham R., “Two notes on the ‘great’ Celtiberian inscription of Peñalba de Villastar”, Studia Celtica 42 (2008): 160–166.
Isaac, Graham R., “A new conjecture on the origins of absolute and conjunct flexion”, Ériu 57 (2007): 49–60.
Isaac, Graham R., “The reflexes of the British diphthong *au”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 11 (2007): 23–47.  
abstract:

The paper revisits the question of the way the British diphthong *au is reflected in the extant Brittonic languages. The proposal that the correct chain of development was *au > > W u is upheld, the evidence for the alternative proposal, *au > * ō > tonic MW aw, being examined and found inadequate. Related issues of the origins of some forms of the conjugated prepositions, some etymologies and some further contingent matters are discussed.

abstract:

The paper revisits the question of the way the British diphthong *au is reflected in the extant Brittonic languages. The proposal that the correct chain of development was *au > > W u is upheld, the evidence for the alternative proposal, *au > * ō > tonic MW aw, being examined and found inadequate. Related issues of the origins of some forms of the conjugated prepositions, some etymologies and some further contingent matters are discussed.

Isaac, Graham R., “A note on Cormac’s Pictish brooch”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 9 (2005): 73–82.  
abstract:
A tenth-century Irish glossary attributes a word for 'brooch' to the 'Pictish language'. The word also occurs in an eighth-century Irish law text, and the glossator's form has been compared with a hapax legomenon word in an Old Welsh poem. This note discusses the possible etymological relations between these words, and pursues the wider implications of the linguistic analysis so constructed.
abstract:
A tenth-century Irish glossary attributes a word for 'brooch' to the 'Pictish language'. The word also occurs in an eighth-century Irish law text, and the glossator's form has been compared with a hapax legomenon word in an Old Welsh poem. This note discusses the possible etymological relations between these words, and pursues the wider implications of the linguistic analysis so constructed.
Isaac, Graham R., “Medieval Welsh Englynion duad and Proto-Indo-European *diḗus ph2tḗr”, Journal of Celtic Studies 5 (2005): 97–106.
Isaac, G. R., “Welsh sudd ‘juice’, hufen ‘cream’”, Studia Celtica 38 (2004): 179–180.
Isaac, Graham R., “The chronology of the development of Brittonic stops and the spirant mutation”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 8 (2004): 49–85.  
abstract:

The 'standard' account of the development of the Neo-Brittonic fricatives which are written in Welsh as ff, ph, th, ch, is that of Jackson's Language and History in Early Britain, which traces these sounds historically to geminates *pp, *tt, *kk, in Brittonic and Celtic, and Latin pp, tt, cc in loans (with phonological adjustments, these comments apply equally to Cornish and Breton). However, this 'standard' account has been a minority view for some decades. It was challenged early by David Greene, who was followed at various intervals by Anthony Harvey, Peter Wynn Thomas and Patrick Sims-Williams. Although these scholars have presented analyses which differ to a greater or lesser extent from one another, they nevertheless have in common the rejection of the LHEB account, in particular, the tracing of the Welsh spirants directly to old geminates. They see instead various separate changes in relative chronology, including the simplification of the geminates to the corresponding simple stops. I have upheld an LHEB-type analysis in previous work, and in the present paper will show in greater detail, 1) why the revisionist view is false (false predictions of how the attested forms should turn out), and 2) elaborate on the actual mechanisms involved in the development of Neo-Brittonic consonants, emphasizing the nature of phonology as a cognitive system of knowledge, rather than a physical system of sounds and articulations.

abstract:

The 'standard' account of the development of the Neo-Brittonic fricatives which are written in Welsh as ff, ph, th, ch, is that of Jackson's Language and History in Early Britain, which traces these sounds historically to geminates *pp, *tt, *kk, in Brittonic and Celtic, and Latin pp, tt, cc in loans (with phonological adjustments, these comments apply equally to Cornish and Breton). However, this 'standard' account has been a minority view for some decades. It was challenged early by David Greene, who was followed at various intervals by Anthony Harvey, Peter Wynn Thomas and Patrick Sims-Williams. Although these scholars have presented analyses which differ to a greater or lesser extent from one another, they nevertheless have in common the rejection of the LHEB account, in particular, the tracing of the Welsh spirants directly to old geminates. They see instead various separate changes in relative chronology, including the simplification of the geminates to the corresponding simple stops. I have upheld an LHEB-type analysis in previous work, and in the present paper will show in greater detail, 1) why the revisionist view is false (false predictions of how the attested forms should turn out), and 2) elaborate on the actual mechanisms involved in the development of Neo-Brittonic consonants, emphasizing the nature of phonology as a cognitive system of knowledge, rather than a physical system of sounds and articulations.

Isaac, Graham R., “Canu Aneirin awdl LI revisited: Gildas and the Gododdin”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 54 (2004): 144–153.
Isaac, Graham R., “The Old- and early Middle Welsh ‘future’ tense: form and function of a moribund category”, Journal of Celtic Studies 4 (2004): 153–170.
Isaac, G. R., “The nature and origins of the Celtic languages: Atlantic seaways, Italo-Celtic and other paralinguistic misapprehensions”, Studia Celtica 38 (2004): 49–58.
Isaac, Graham R., “Prospects in Old Irish syntax”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 53 (2003): 181–197.
Isaac, Graham R., “Scholarship and patriotism: the case of the oldest Welsh poetry”, Studi Celtici 1 (2002): 65–79.
Isaac, G. R., “Cymraeg rhyngu, rhanc, Hen Wyddeleg ro-icc; Dadl y corff a’r enaid ll. 128 dinag”, Studia Celtica 36 (2002): 141–145.
Isaac, Graham R., “Perfectivity, transitivity, ergativity: the grammar of case in Welsh non-finite clauses”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 7 (2002): 39–61.
Isaac, Graham R., “‘Gwarchan Maeldderw’: a ‘lost’ medieval Welsh classic?”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 44 (Winter, 2002): 73–96.
Isaac, Graham R., “‘Ymddiddan Taliesin ac Ugnach’: propaganda Cymreig yn oes y Croesgadau?”, Llên Cymru 25 (2002): 12–20.
Ingenta Connect: <link>
Isaac, Graham R., “The Celtiberian alphabetic signs san and sigma and the ablative singular”, Studia Celtica 36 (2002): 1–20.
Isaac, G. R., “Welsh byw, byd, hyd”, Studia Celtica 36 (2002): 145–147.
Isaac, Graham R., “Mydr a pherfformiad yr Hengerdd”, Dwned 7 (2001): 9–26.
Isaac, G. R., “The Gaulish inscription of Séraucourt à Bourges”, Studia Celtica 35 (2001): 350–353.
Isaac, G. R., “An Indo-European athematic imperfect in Welsh? Middle Welsh gwant”, Studia Celtica 35 (2001): 354–359.
Isaac, Graham R., “The function and typology of absolute and conjunct flexion in early Celtic: some hints from Ancient Egyptian”, Transactions of the Philological Society 99 (2001, 2001): 145–168.
Isaac, G. R., “Nodiadau ar linellau ac awdlau o'r Gododdin”, Studia Celtica 35 (2001): 271–283.
Isaac, G. R., “Dau nodyn ar englynion Geraint fab Erbin yn Llyfr Du Caerfyrddin”, Studia Celtica 34 (2000): 273–274.
Isaac, G. R., “Naw englyn y Juvencus llinell 6c”, Studia Celtica 34 (2000): 272–273.
Isaac, G. R., “leubrit, loubrit”, Studia Celtica 34 (2000): 271–272.
Isaac, G. R., “Colli sillafau mewn Brythoneg”, Studia Celtica 34 (2000): 105–118.
Isaac, Graham R. [ed. and tr.], “Trawsganu Kynan Garwyn mab Brochuael: a tenth-century political poem”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 51 (1999): 173–185.
Isaac, Graham R., “Readings in the history and transmission of the Gododdin”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 37 (Summer, 1999): 55–78.
Isaac, Graham R., “Gweith Gwen Ystrat and the northern heroic age of the sixth century”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 36 (1998): 61–70.
Isaac, Graham R., “Vocative plural of masculine *(y)o- stems in Old Irish”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 333–340.
Isaac, Graham, “Zwei kymrische Etymologien”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 46 (1994): 200–202.
Isaac, Graham R., “The end of the world in Welsh and Irish: a common disaster”, Studia Celtica 28 (1994): 173–174.
Isaac, Graham R., “The progressive aspect marker: W. yn / OIr. oc”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 3 (May, 1994): 33–39.
Isaac, Graham R., “Some Welsh etymologies”, Études Celtiques 30 (1994): 229–231.  
abstract:
[FR] Quelques étymologies galloises.
L'auteur propose des étymologies pour les formes galloises gwartheg «bétail», bustach «taurillon», tayawc «villain», Maiuc, nom propre, et il discute la parenté des formes (y)ryngof, (y)rof etc., «entre moi... » etc.

[EN] The author proposes etymologies for the Welsh forms gwartheg cattle , bustach bullock , tayawc villein , Maiuc, personal name, and discusses the relationships of the forms (y)ryngof, (y)rof etc., between me... etc.
Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 30, 1994: <link>
abstract:
[FR] Quelques étymologies galloises.
L'auteur propose des étymologies pour les formes galloises gwartheg «bétail», bustach «taurillon», tayawc «villain», Maiuc, nom propre, et il discute la parenté des formes (y)ryngof, (y)rof etc., «entre moi... » etc.

[EN] The author proposes etymologies for the Welsh forms gwartheg cattle , bustach bullock , tayawc villein , Maiuc, personal name, and discusses the relationships of the forms (y)ryngof, (y)rof etc., between me... etc.
Isaac, Graham R., “Mydr a morffoffonemeg yn yr Hengerdd”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 40 (1993): 1–16.
Isaac, Graham R., “Canu Aneirin awdl LI”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 2 (1993): 65–91.
Isaac, G. R., “Issues in the reconstruction and analysis of Insular Celtic syntax and phonology”, Ériu 44 (1993): 1–32.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Isaac, Graham, “On the necessity of giving voice to rhetorical and philosophical issues in two Brittonic etymologies”, in: Dónall Ó Baoill, Donncha Ó hAodha, and Nollaig Ó Muraíle (eds), Saltair saíochta, sanasaíochta agus seanchais: A festschrift for Gearóid Mac Eoin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 75–77.
Isaac, Graham R., “Celtic and Afro-Asiatic: a further note on the theory of prehistoric contact between them”, in: Stefan Zimmer (ed.), Kelten am Rhein: Akten des dreizehnten Internationalen Keltologiekongresses, 23. bis 27. Juli 2007 in Bonn, 2 vols, vol. 2: Philologie: Sprachen und Literaturen, Mainz: Philipp von Zabern, 2009. 95–103.
Isaac, Graham R., “Wege der Kelten, Wege der Keltologie: kulturwissenschaftliche Betrachtungen zur Funktion einer Geisteswissenschaft”, in: Gisbert Hemprich (ed.), Festgabe für Hildegard L. C. Tristram: überreicht von Studenten, Kollegen und Freunden des ehemaligen Faches Keltologie der Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, 1, Berlin: Curach Bhán, 2009. 37–54.
Isaac, Graham R., “A relative chronology from Proto-Indo-European to Celtic”, in: Graham R. Isaac, Studies in Celtic sound changes and their chronology, 127, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2007. 61–74.
Isaac, Graham R., “The origins of Celtic”, in: Graham R. Isaac, Studies in Celtic sound changes and their chronology, 127, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2007. 75–95.
Isaac, Graham R., “The rule of palatalisation in Proto-Irish”, in: Graham R. Isaac, Studies in Celtic sound changes and their chronology, 127, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2007. 97–113.
Isaac, G. R., “Armes Prydain Fawr and St David”, in: J. Wyn Evans, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds), St David of Wales: cult, church and nation, 24, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2007. 161–181.
Isaac, Graham R., “A rule of laryngeals in Celtic”, in: Graham R. Isaac, Studies in Celtic sound changes and their chronology, 127, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2007. 21–59.
Isaac, Graham R., “Celtic and Afro-Asiatic”, in: Hildegard L. C. Tristram (ed.), The Celtic languages in contact: papers from the workshop within the framework of the XIII International Congress of Celtic Studies, Bonn, 26-27 July 2007, Online: Universitätsverlag Potsdam, 2007. 25–80.
Isaac, Graham R., “Loss of PIE *p in Celtic and related matters”, in: Graham R. Isaac, Studies in Celtic sound changes and their chronology, 127, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachen und Literaturen der Universität Innsbruck, 2007. 11–20.
Isaac, Graham, “The structure and typology of prepositional relative clauses in Early Welsh”, in: Paul Russell (ed.), Yr hen iaith: studies in early Welsh, 7, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2003. 75–93.
Isaac, G. R., “Zur frühen keltischen Metrik”, in: Stefan Zimmer, Rolf Ködderitzsch, and Arndt Wigger (eds), Akten des zweiten deutschen Keltologen-Symposiums (Bonn, 2.–4. April 1997), 17, Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1999. 77–96.

Miscellaneous

Isaac, Graham R., Simon Rodway, Silva Nurmio, Kit Kapphahn, and Patrick Sims-Williams [eds.], Rhyddiaith Gymraeg o lawysgrifau’r 13eg ganrif: fersiwn 2, Aberystwyth: Aberystwyth University, Department of Welsh and Celtic Studies, 2013. Computer file.
Isaac, Graham R. [ed.], and Simon Rodway [ed.], Rhyddiaith Gymraeg o lawysgrifau’r 13eg ganrif: testun cyflawn, Aberystwyth: University of Wales Press, 2002. CD-ROM.  
Transcriptions of Welsh-language texts from 13th-century Welsh manuscripts, transcribed by G. R. Isaac and Simon Rodway, with assistance from Ingo Mittendorf, Brynley F. Roberts and D. Mark Smith. New versions were published online in 2010 and 2013.
Transcriptions of Welsh-language texts from 13th-century Welsh manuscripts, transcribed by G. R. Isaac and Simon Rodway, with assistance from Ingo Mittendorf, Brynley F. Roberts and D. Mark Smith. New versions were published online in 2010 and 2013.