Bibliography

Ben
Guy

22 publications between 2014 and 2020 indexed
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Works authored

Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020.  
abstract:
Genealogy was a central element of life in medieval Wales. It was the force that held society together and the framework for all political action. For these reasons, genealogical writing in medieval Wales, as elsewhere in Europe, became a fundamental tool for representing and manipulating perceptions of the socio-political order across historical and literary time. From its beginnings within an early medieval Insular genre of genealogical writing, Welsh genealogy developed across the Middle Ages as a unique and pervasive phenomenon. This book provides the first integrated study of and comprehensive introduction to genealogy in medieval Wales, setting it in the context of genealogical writing from Ireland, England and beyond and tracing its evolution from the eighth to the sixteenth century. The three most important collections of secular genealogies are carefully analysed and their composition is considered in relation to medieval Welsh politics. Particular attention is devoted to the pedigrees of the kings and princes of Gwynedd, which were subject to many intricate alterations over time. The book also includes fresh critical editions of the most significant extant collections of secular genealogy.
abstract:
Genealogy was a central element of life in medieval Wales. It was the force that held society together and the framework for all political action. For these reasons, genealogical writing in medieval Wales, as elsewhere in Europe, became a fundamental tool for representing and manipulating perceptions of the socio-political order across historical and literary time. From its beginnings within an early medieval Insular genre of genealogical writing, Welsh genealogy developed across the Middle Ages as a unique and pervasive phenomenon. This book provides the first integrated study of and comprehensive introduction to genealogy in medieval Wales, setting it in the context of genealogical writing from Ireland, England and beyond and tracing its evolution from the eighth to the sixteenth century. The three most important collections of secular genealogies are carefully analysed and their composition is considered in relation to medieval Welsh politics. Particular attention is devoted to the pedigrees of the kings and princes of Gwynedd, which were subject to many intricate alterations over time. The book also includes fresh critical editions of the most significant extant collections of secular genealogy.

Works edited

Guy, Ben, Georgia Henley, Owain Wyn Jones, and Rebecca Thomas (eds), The chronicles of medieval Wales and the March: new contexts, studies, and text, Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 31, Brepols, 2020.  
abstract:
This book offers a collection of new studies on the chronicles of medieval Wales and the March, supported by synoptic pieces placing the tradition of chronicle writing in Wales within the context of historical writing on a broader scale. The volume is accompanied by five editions and translations of little-known texts written in Latin and Medieval Welsh.

The chronicles of medieval Wales are a rich body of source material offering an array of perspectives on historical developments in Wales and beyond. Preserving unique records of events from the fifth to the fifteenth centuries, these chronicles form the essential narrative backbone of all modern accounts of medieval Welsh history. Most celebrated of all are the chronicles belonging to the Annales Cambriae and Brut y Tywysogyon families, which document the tumultuous struggles between the Welsh princes and their Norman and English neighbours for control over Wales.

Building on foundational studies of these chronicles by J. E. Lloyd, Thomas Jones, Kathleen Hughes, and others, this book seeks to enhance understanding of the texts by refining and complicating the ways in which they should be read as deliberate literary and historical productions. The studies in this volume make significant advances in this direction through fresh analyses of well-known texts, as well as through full studies, editions, and translations of five chronicles that had hitherto escaped notice.
abstract:
This book offers a collection of new studies on the chronicles of medieval Wales and the March, supported by synoptic pieces placing the tradition of chronicle writing in Wales within the context of historical writing on a broader scale. The volume is accompanied by five editions and translations of little-known texts written in Latin and Medieval Welsh.

The chronicles of medieval Wales are a rich body of source material offering an array of perspectives on historical developments in Wales and beyond. Preserving unique records of events from the fifth to the fifteenth centuries, these chronicles form the essential narrative backbone of all modern accounts of medieval Welsh history. Most celebrated of all are the chronicles belonging to the Annales Cambriae and Brut y Tywysogyon families, which document the tumultuous struggles between the Welsh princes and their Norman and English neighbours for control over Wales.

Building on foundational studies of these chronicles by J. E. Lloyd, Thomas Jones, Kathleen Hughes, and others, this book seeks to enhance understanding of the texts by refining and complicating the ways in which they should be read as deliberate literary and historical productions. The studies in this volume make significant advances in this direction through fresh analyses of well-known texts, as well as through full studies, editions, and translations of five chronicles that had hitherto escaped notice.

Contributions to journals

Guy, Ben, “The Life of St Dyfrig and the lost charters of Moccas (Mochros), Herefordshire”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 75 (2018): 1–37.
Guy, Ben, “The earliest Welsh genealogies: textual layering and the phenomenon of ‘pedigree growth’”, Early Medieval Europe 26:4 (November, 2018): 462–485. URL: <https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/emed.12296>. 
abstract:
This article examines the ways in which early medieval genealogical texts might be augmented over time in order to reflect changing political situations. Two early ninth‐century tracts from the kingdoms of Powys and Dyfed in Wales are taken as case studies. Textual and chronological problems with the tracts are discussed, and contexts are proposed for the circumstances of their composition. It is suggested that each of these tracts stands at the head of a process of ‘pedigree growth’, whereby, during the course of textual transmission, the genealogical content of each tract was extended both backwards and forwards in time.
abstract:
This article examines the ways in which early medieval genealogical texts might be augmented over time in order to reflect changing political situations. Two early ninth‐century tracts from the kingdoms of Powys and Dyfed in Wales are taken as case studies. Textual and chronological problems with the tracts are discussed, and contexts are proposed for the circumstances of their composition. It is suggested that each of these tracts stands at the head of a process of ‘pedigree growth’, whereby, during the course of textual transmission, the genealogical content of each tract was extended both backwards and forwards in time.
Guy, Ben, “A lost medieval manuscript from North Wales: Hengwrt 33, the Hanesyn Hên”, Studia Celtica 50 (2016): 69–105.
Guy, Ben, “The textual history of the Harleian genealogies”, Welsh History Review 28 (2016): 1–25.  
abstract:
The genealogical collection known as the 'Harleian genealogies' is one of the few surviving texts written in early medieval Wales. It is commonly accepted that the collection was finalized in St Davids in c.954, but it is less frequently acknowledged that the extant text is the result of the combination of a number of older, pre-existing written sources. It is argued here that the core of the Harleian genealogies derives from a genealogical appendix written for the Historia Brittonum at some point in the decades immediately prior to 872, into which was later interpolated sections taken from a number of other genealogical texts.
abstract:
The genealogical collection known as the 'Harleian genealogies' is one of the few surviving texts written in early medieval Wales. It is commonly accepted that the collection was finalized in St Davids in c.954, but it is less frequently acknowledged that the extant text is the result of the combination of a number of older, pre-existing written sources. It is argued here that the core of the Harleian genealogies derives from a genealogical appendix written for the Historia Brittonum at some point in the decades immediately prior to 872, into which was later interpolated sections taken from a number of other genealogical texts.
Guy, Ben, “The origins of the compilation of Welsh historical texts in Harley 3859”, Studia Celtica 49 (2015): 21–56.
Guy, Ben, “A Welsh manuscript in America: Library Company of Philadelphia, 8680.O”, National Library of Wales Journal 36:1 (2014): 1–26.
Library of Wales: <link>
Guy, Ben, “A second witness to the Welsh material in Harley 3859”, Quaestio Insularis 15 (2014): 72–91.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Guy, Ben, “Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Welsh sources”, in: Smith, Joshua Byron, and Georgia Henley (eds), A companion to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Brill's Companions to European History 22, Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2020. 31–66.
Guy, Ben, “Coda”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 265–268.
Guy, Ben, “Historical scholars and dishonest charlatans: studying the chronicles of medieval Wales”, in: Guy, Ben, Georgia Henley, Owain Wyn Jones, and Rebecca Thomas (eds), The chronicles of medieval Wales and the March: new contexts, studies, and text, Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 31, Brepols, 2020. 69–106.
Guy, Ben, “The reception of Geoffrey of Monmouth in Wales”, in: Smith, Joshua Byron, and Georgia Henley (eds), A companion to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Brill's Companions to European History 22, Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2020. 494–497.
Guy, Ben, “[2] The earliest Welsh genealogical collections: the St Davids recension and the Gwynedd collection of genealogies”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 51–100.  
Incl. The Harleian genealogies (p. 53) -- The St Davids recension in Llancarfan (p. 79).
Incl. The Harleian genealogies (p. 53) -- The St Davids recension in Llancarfan (p. 79).
Guy, Ben, “Brut Ieuan Brechfa: a Welsh poet writes the early Middle Ages”, in: Guy, Ben, Georgia Henley, Owain Wyn Jones, and Rebecca Thomas (eds), The chronicles of medieval Wales and the March: new contexts, studies, and text, Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 31, Brepols, 2020. 375–419.
Guy, Ben, “Appendix A: supporting material”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 269–332.  
Contents: A.2.1: Manuscripts of the St Cadog genealogies -- A.2.2: The St Cadog genealogies -- A.2.3: Geoffrey of Monmouth's use of the St Davids recension -- A.3.1: The contents of Jesus 20 -- A.3.2: The Jesus 20 king-list -- A.3.3: Pedigrees from the Pseudo-Rhodri Mawr recension -- A.3.4: A Welsh version of the Brychan narrative: Sarth Marthin gynt, ynawr Brycheiniawc -- A.3.5: Witnesses to the Ceredig tract -- A.3.6: The sons of Glywys -- A.4.1: Witnesses to Ieuan Brechfa's lost manuscript(s) -- A.4.2: Witnesses to Henry Salesbury's lost manuscript -- A.4.3: Bonedd y Llwythau -- A.4.4: Additional material in Llyma Dalm o Weheliaethau a Llwythau Cymru -- A.4.5: The use of De gestis Britonum in the pedigree of Beli Mawr -- A.4.6: The use of Historia Gruffud vab Kenan in the Llywelyn ab Iorwerth genealogies -- A.4.7: Pedigrees from the St Davids recension -- A.5.1: Cyprius quidam filius Ieuan and its relatives.
Contents: A.2.1: Manuscripts of the St Cadog genealogies -- A.2.2: The St Cadog genealogies -- A.2.3: Geoffrey of Monmouth's use of the St Davids recension -- A.3.1: The contents of Jesus 20 -- A.3.2: The Jesus 20 king-list -- A.3.3: Pedigrees from the Pseudo-Rhodri Mawr recension -- A.3.4: A Welsh version of the Brychan narrative: Sarth Marthin gynt, ynawr Brycheiniawc -- A.3.5: Witnesses to the Ceredig tract -- A.3.6: The sons of Glywys -- A.4.1: Witnesses to Ieuan Brechfa's lost manuscript(s) -- A.4.2: Witnesses to Henry Salesbury's lost manuscript -- A.4.3: Bonedd y Llwythau -- A.4.4: Additional material in Llyma Dalm o Weheliaethau a Llwythau Cymru -- A.4.5: The use of De gestis Britonum in the pedigree of Beli Mawr -- A.4.6: The use of Historia Gruffud vab Kenan in the Llywelyn ab Iorwerth genealogies -- A.4.7: Pedigrees from the St Davids recension -- A.5.1: Cyprius quidam filius Ieuan and its relatives.
Guy, Ben, “[5] The pedigrees of the kings of Gwynedd”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 233–264.  
Contents: Early versions traced through Cunedda Wledig -- The pedigree from Beli Mawr to Adam -- The pedigree of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd -- The Exeter 3514 genealogies -- Mortimer genealogies -- The fifteenth-century extended Galfridian pedigree.
Contents: Early versions traced through Cunedda Wledig -- The pedigree from Beli Mawr to Adam -- The pedigree of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd -- The Exeter 3514 genealogies -- Mortimer genealogies -- The fifteenth-century extended Galfridian pedigree.
Guy, Ben, “Appendix B: editions”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 333–438.  
Contents: B.1: The St Davids recension -- B.2: The Jesus 20 genealogies --- B.3: Gwehelyth Morgannwg --- B.4: The Llywelyn ab Iorwerth genealogies --- B.5: The Gutun Owain recension of the Llywelyn ab Iorwerth genealogies --- B.6: Llyma Dalm o Weheliaethau a Llwythau Cymru --- B.7: Llyma Frychan Brycheiniog a'i blant --- B.8: Bonedd Gwŷr y Gogledd --- B.9: The Mostyn genealogies --- B.10: The Cwtta Cyfarwydd genealogies --- B.11: Brenhinllwyth Morgannwg.
Contents: B.1: The St Davids recension -- B.2: The Jesus 20 genealogies --- B.3: Gwehelyth Morgannwg --- B.4: The Llywelyn ab Iorwerth genealogies --- B.5: The Gutun Owain recension of the Llywelyn ab Iorwerth genealogies --- B.6: Llyma Dalm o Weheliaethau a Llwythau Cymru --- B.7: Llyma Frychan Brycheiniog a'i blant --- B.8: Bonedd Gwŷr y Gogledd --- B.9: The Mostyn genealogies --- B.10: The Cwtta Cyfarwydd genealogies --- B.11: Brenhinllwyth Morgannwg.
Guy, Ben, “[4] Reframing the Welsh past in early thirteenth-century Gwynedd: the Llywelyn ab Iorwerth genealogies”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 159–232.
Guy, Ben, “[1] Medieval Welsh genealogy and its contexts”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 1–50.
Guy, Ben, “[3] A southern genealogical anthology: the Jesus 20 genealogies”, in: Guy, Ben, Medieval Welsh genealogy: an introduction and textual study, Studies in Celtic History 42, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2020. 101–158.  
Contents: The manuscript -- The extant form of the Jesus 20 genealogies -- The Jesus 20 genealogies, Source II -- The Jesus 20 genealogies, Source I -- The sources of the Morgan ab Owain genealogies.
Contents: The manuscript -- The extant form of the Jesus 20 genealogies -- The Jesus 20 genealogies, Source II -- The Jesus 20 genealogies, Source I -- The sources of the Morgan ab Owain genealogies.