Bibliography

Ralph A.
Griffiths
s. xx / s. xxi

10 publications between 1975 and 2012 indexed
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Works authored

Griffiths, Ralph Alan, Sir Rhys ap Thomas and his family: a study in the Wars of the Roses and early Tudor politics, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1993.

Works edited

Griffiths, Ralph A., and Phillipp R. Schofield (eds.), Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages: essays presented to J. Beverley Smith, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011.

Contributions to journals

Griffiths, Ralph, “Owain Glyn Dŵr's invasion of the Central March of Wales in 1402: the evidence of clerical taxation”, Studia Celtica 46 (2012): 111–122.
Griffiths, Ralph A., “Obituary: Sir Rees Davies (1938–2005)”, Welsh History Review 23 (2006): 160–165.
Griffiths, Ralph A., “Bridgwater, Oxford and Whitland Abbey in 1491”, Studia Celtica 38 (2004): 125–130.
Griffiths, Ralph A., “After Glyn Dŵr: an age of reconciliation? [Sir John Rhŷs Memorial Lecture]”, Proceedings of the British Academy 117 (2001): 139–164.  
abstract:
During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, following Edward I's final conquest, the inhabitants of the whole of Wales were adjusting to the fact that they were a cosmopolitan people of diverse origins. Their communities were interleaved, in varying measure, with migrants from England and Ireland, France and the Low Countries, and from elsewhere in Wales, and this process was unlikely to be reversed. In particular, contacts between English and Welsh multiplied, and relationships between them deepened. The revolt of Owain Glyn Dŵr in the first decade of the fifteenth century, the most serious of the challenges that faced the unsteady Lancastrian king, Henry IV, threatened for a time to disrupt this process. The gradual defeat of Glyn Dŵr's supporters and allies in the decade after 1406 posed large and pressing questions: how to ensure security for the English kingdom in the west thenceforward; how to restore peace and stability to the commonwealth; and how to achieve reconciliation among the peoples of Wales and with the king's subjects in England. This chapter examines the aftermath of Glyn Dŵr's revolt, particularly the relationship between English and Welsh in the borderland.
abstract:
During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, following Edward I's final conquest, the inhabitants of the whole of Wales were adjusting to the fact that they were a cosmopolitan people of diverse origins. Their communities were interleaved, in varying measure, with migrants from England and Ireland, France and the Low Countries, and from elsewhere in Wales, and this process was unlikely to be reversed. In particular, contacts between English and Welsh multiplied, and relationships between them deepened. The revolt of Owain Glyn Dŵr in the first decade of the fifteenth century, the most serious of the challenges that faced the unsteady Lancastrian king, Henry IV, threatened for a time to disrupt this process. The gradual defeat of Glyn Dŵr's supporters and allies in the decade after 1406 posed large and pressing questions: how to ensure security for the English kingdom in the west thenceforward; how to restore peace and stability to the commonwealth; and how to achieve reconciliation among the peoples of Wales and with the king's subjects in England. This chapter examines the aftermath of Glyn Dŵr's revolt, particularly the relationship between English and Welsh in the borderland.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Griffiths, Ralph A., “Who were the townsfolk of medieval Wales?”, in: Fulton, Helen (ed.), Urban culture in medieval Wales, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2012. 9–18.
Griffiths, Ralph A., “William Rees and the modern study of medieval Wales”, in: Griffiths, Ralph A., and Phillipp R. Schofield (eds.), Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages: essays presented to J. Beverley Smith, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011. 203–220.
Griffiths, Ralph A., “Medieval Severnside: the Welsh connection”, in: Davies, R. R. [ed.], Welsh society and nationhood: historical essays presented to Glanmor Williams, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1984. 70–89.