Bibliography

Inge
Genee
s. xx / s. xxi

9 publications between 1993 and 2005 indexed
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Theses

Genee, Inge, “Sentential complementation in a functional grammar of Irish”, LOT Dissertation Series 7, The Hague, PhD thesis: Holland Academic Graphics, 1998.

Works edited

Genee, Inge, Bart Jaski, and Bernadette Smelik (eds.), Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre... Verhaal, taal en recht in de Keltische wereld. Liber amicorum voor Leni van Strien-Gerritsen, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2003.

Contributions to journals

Genee, Inge, “Latin influence on Old Irish? A case study in medieval language contact”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 9 (2005): 33–72.  
abstract:

This paper evaluates proposals for Latin influence on a number of developments in medieval Irish against recent theories of contact-induced change as presented by Thomason and Kaufman (1988) and Thomason (2001). Given the relevant sociolinguistic context, we would expect the medieval Latin/Irish contact situation to be a special type of non-oral borrowing scenario involving influence from a prestigious literary/sacral language on a developing standard vernacular. In such a scenario the expectations are for heavy lexical borrowing of non-basic vocabulary items combined with minor borrowing of non-invasive structural items such as certain types of function words, new phonemes restricted to loanwords and high-prestige morphosyntactic construction types which do not affect basic syntax of the borrowing language. All proposals found in the literature for lexical and structural borrowing of Latin elements in medieval Irish are shown to fit into this general classification. However, closer examination of the proposals for structural borrowing reveals that most are better explained as having internal causes, either exclusively or at least additionally. Only borrowing related to the lexicon can be firmly established, confirming the claim that the role of Latin in medieval Ireland remained linguistically limited.

abstract:

This paper evaluates proposals for Latin influence on a number of developments in medieval Irish against recent theories of contact-induced change as presented by Thomason and Kaufman (1988) and Thomason (2001). Given the relevant sociolinguistic context, we would expect the medieval Latin/Irish contact situation to be a special type of non-oral borrowing scenario involving influence from a prestigious literary/sacral language on a developing standard vernacular. In such a scenario the expectations are for heavy lexical borrowing of non-basic vocabulary items combined with minor borrowing of non-invasive structural items such as certain types of function words, new phonemes restricted to loanwords and high-prestige morphosyntactic construction types which do not affect basic syntax of the borrowing language. All proposals found in the literature for lexical and structural borrowing of Latin elements in medieval Irish are shown to fit into this general classification. However, closer examination of the proposals for structural borrowing reveals that most are better explained as having internal causes, either exclusively or at least additionally. Only borrowing related to the lexicon can be firmly established, confirming the claim that the role of Latin in medieval Ireland remained linguistically limited.

Auwera, Johan van der, and Inge Genee, “English do: on the convergence of languages and linguists”, English Language and Linguistics 6:2 (2002): 283–307.  
abstract:
This article surveys the debate on the origin of periphrastic do, with particular attention to the hypothesis that Celtic languages might have exerted some influence. With respect to the facts, it is argued that there are various types of Celtic hypotheses and that one type is sensible, though unlikely to be proven and even less likely to be proven to be the only relevant factor. With respect to the debate itself, it is shown that a Celtic origin hypothesis is accepted more widely among non-British scholars, and we speculate why that might be the case.
abstract:
This article surveys the debate on the origin of periphrastic do, with particular attention to the hypothesis that Celtic languages might have exerted some influence. With respect to the facts, it is argued that there are various types of Celtic hypotheses and that one type is sensible, though unlikely to be proven and even less likely to be proven to be the only relevant factor. With respect to the debate itself, it is shown that a Celtic origin hypothesis is accepted more widely among non-British scholars, and we speculate why that might be the case.
Genee, Inge, “On the disappearance of the subjunctive from Irish complementation”, Papers in Experimental and Theoretical Linguistics 5 (2000): 39–59.
Genee, Inge, “Pragmatic aspects of verbal noun complements in Early Irish: do + VN in the Würzburg glosses”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 3 (May, 1994): 41–73.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Genee, Inge, “Het ene bloedbad is het andere niet: narratieve tijden in Longes Mac nUislenn 'De ballingschap van de zonen van Uisliu'”, in: Genee, Inge, Bart Jaski, and Bernadette Smelik (eds.), Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre... Verhaal, taal en recht in de Keltische wereld. Liber amicorum voor Leni van Strien-Gerritsen, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2003. 72–83.
Genee, Inge, “De Ierse taal en taalkunde”, in: Veelenturf, Kees [ed.], Kelten & keltologen: inleidingen over de Keltische talen en hun letterkunde, met een catalogus, Amsterdam: Gerard Timmer Prods, 1993. 22–25, 77–79.
Genee, Inge, “De Ierse literatuur tot ca. 1200”, in: Veelenturf, Kees [ed.], Kelten & keltologen: inleidingen over de Keltische talen en hun letterkunde, met een catalogus, Amsterdam: Gerard Timmer Prods, 1993. 30–33, 81–85.