Bibliography

Francis J. (Francis John)
Byrne
s. xx / s. xxi

27 publications between 1964 and 2008 indexed
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Works authored

Byrne, Francis J., William Jenkins, Gillian Kenny, and Catherine Swift, Historical Knowth and its hinterland, Excavations at Knowth 4, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2008.  
abstract:

This volume evaluates the historical role of Knowth and wider Brugh na Bóinne. It explores the history, settlement and society of Knowth and the wider Brugh na Bóinne district - from the emergence of political power in the Boyne Valley to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

The first chapter deals with the earliest references to the region in the seventh and eighth century as an important place within the kingdom of North Brega and as, from the eighth century, its royal residence. The ogham and vernacular inscriptions found in the Knowth passage tombs - the tomb ‘graffiti’ comprising five scholastic oghams and sixteen personal names in the vernacular style - are also discussed.

Chapter II focuses on the Medieval period from the demise of the old Brega kingship and its replacement by a Cistercian monastic order in 1142. Changes in the pattern of settlement, from the occupation of the area by the Anglo-Normans to the Reformation, are examined.

Chapter III discusses the emergence of the Protestant landed gentry in the eighteenth century and the economic development of the area right through to the present. It considers the acquisition by the Irish state of the large mound at Knowth, the programmes of excavation and conservation at the site and development of Brugh na Bóinne as a place of mass tourism.

This landmark publication reveals in its full scope how the material world of Brugh na Bóinne was collectively carved and constructed through the centuries.

– Available for free in PDF form: <link>
abstract:

This volume evaluates the historical role of Knowth and wider Brugh na Bóinne. It explores the history, settlement and society of Knowth and the wider Brugh na Bóinne district - from the emergence of political power in the Boyne Valley to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

The first chapter deals with the earliest references to the region in the seventh and eighth century as an important place within the kingdom of North Brega and as, from the eighth century, its royal residence. The ogham and vernacular inscriptions found in the Knowth passage tombs - the tomb ‘graffiti’ comprising five scholastic oghams and sixteen personal names in the vernacular style - are also discussed.

Chapter II focuses on the Medieval period from the demise of the old Brega kingship and its replacement by a Cistercian monastic order in 1142. Changes in the pattern of settlement, from the occupation of the area by the Anglo-Normans to the Reformation, are examined.

Chapter III discusses the emergence of the Protestant landed gentry in the eighteenth century and the economic development of the area right through to the present. It considers the acquisition by the Irish state of the large mound at Knowth, the programmes of excavation and conservation at the site and development of Brugh na Bóinne as a place of mass tourism.

This landmark publication reveals in its full scope how the material world of Brugh na Bóinne was collectively carved and constructed through the centuries.

Moody, T. W., F. X. Martin, and F. J. Byrne (eds.), A new history of Ireland, vol. 9: Maps, genealogies, lists: a companion to Irish history, part II, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984.
Moody, T. W., F. X. Martin, and F. J. Byrne (eds.), A new history of Ireland, vol. 8: A chronology of Irish history to 1976: a companion to Irish history, part I, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1982.
Byrne, Francis J., A thousand years of Irish script: an exhibition of Irish manuscripts in Oxford libraries, Oxford, 1979.

Works edited

Moody, T. W., F. X. Martin, and F. J. Byrne (eds.), A new history of Ireland, vol. 3: Early modern Ireland, 1534–1691, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1976.

Contributions to journals

Byrne, F. J., “Dercu: the feminine of mocu”, Éigse 28 (1995): 42–70.
Byrne, F. J., “Monastica et onomastica: *Dechrae, Mag nDechrad”, Peritia 2 (1983): 261–264.
Byrne, F. J., “Note: ONOMASTICA 1”, Peritia 1 (1982): 159.
Byrne, F. J., “Note: ONOMASTICA 2”, Peritia 1 (1982): 267.
Byrne, Francis John, “Tribes and tribalism in early Ireland”, Ériu 22 (1971): 128–166.
Moody, T. W., and Francis John Byrne, “Ireland before the Norman Invasion”, Irish Historical Studies 16:61 (March, 1968): 1–14.
Byrne, F. J., “Seventh-century documents”, The Irish Ecclesiastical Record, 5th series, 108 (1967): 164–182.
Byrne, F. J. [ed. and tr.], “Clann Ollaman uaisle Emna”, Studia Hibernica 4 (1964): 54–94.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Swift, Catherine, and Francis J. Byrne [contribs.], “I. The early history of Knowth”, in: Byrne, Francis J., William Jenkins, Gillian Kenny, and Catherine Swift, Historical Knowth and its hinterland, Excavations at Knowth 4, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2008. 5–132.
Collection:  – Available for free in PDF form: <link>
Byrne, F. J., “Ireland and her neighbours, c.1014–c.1072”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 862–898.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, F. J. Byrne, and Peter Harbison, “Bibliography”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 996–1147.
Byrne, F. J., “The viking age”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 609–634.
Byrne, F. J., “Church and politics, c.750–c.1100”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 656–679.
Byrne, F. J., “Ireland before the battle of Clontarf”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 852–861.
Byrne, Francis John, “Chiasmus and hyperbaton in the Annals of Ulster”, in: Richter, Michael, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds.), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 54–64.
Byrne, Francis John, “Ut Beda boat: Cuanu’s signature?”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: texts and transmissions / Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Texte und Überlieferung, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002. 45–67.
Byrne, F. J., “The trembling sod: Ireland in 1169”, in: Cosgrove, Art (ed.), A new history of Ireland, vol. 2: Medieval Ireland, 1169–1534, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press; Clarendon Press, 1987. 1–42.
Byrne, Francis John, “Irland in der europäischen Geisteswelt des 8. Jahrhunderts”, in: Dopsch, Heinz, and Roswitha Juffinger (eds), Virgil von Salzburg: Missionar und Gelehrter. Beiträge des Internationalen Symposiums vom 21.-24. September 1984 in der Salzburger Residenz, Salzburg: Salzburger Landesregierung, 1985. 45–51.
Byrne, Francis John, “Introduction”, in: O'Neill, Timothy, The Irish hand: scribes and their manuscripts from the earliest times to the seventeenth century with an exemplar of Irish scripts, Mountrath: Dolmen Press, 1984. xi–xxvii.
Byrne, F. J., “The Stowe Missal”, in: s.n. (ed.), Great books of Ireland: Thomas Davis lectures, Dublin, London: Clonmore & Reynolds; Burns & Oates, 1967. 38–50.
Byrne, F. J., “Early Irish society: 1st–9th century”, in: Moody, T. W., and F. X. Martin (eds), The course of Irish history, Cork: Cork University Press, 1967. 25–40.

As honouree

Smyth, Alfred P. (ed.), Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000.

As honouree

Smyth, Alfred P. (ed.), Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000.

About the author

“Francis John Byrne: writings”, in: Smyth, Alfred P. (ed.), Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. xv–xviii.