Entities

Fomin (Maxim)

  • s. xx–xxi
  • (agents)
Fomin, Maxim, Ludwig Mülhausen, Séamus Ó Caiside and Scéal Rí na Gréige: the tale of ‘Three golden children’ (ATU 707) in 1937 Donegal, Folklore Fellows' Communications, 319, Helsinki: Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia, 2020.  
abstract:
On 25 August 1937, a strange-looking man appeared in the fishing hamlet of Teelin in Donegal, lreland, wearing a gentleman's suit and a pair of round glasses. He spoke lrish, albeit with a foreign, Kerry accent. After a month there, he asked a local storyteller, Séamus Ó Caiside, if he could relate a few stories for him. Between 24 September and 13 October 1937, the two men recorded 12 tales and two songs across 24 storytelling sessions. The visitor's name was Ludwig Mühlhausen, Professor of Celtic Studies at the University of Berlin. On his return to Germany, ten tales collected from Ó Caiside were published as Zehn irische Volkserzählungen aus Süd-Donegal. Of the tales the scholar chose not to publish, one called 'Scéal Rí na Gréige' ('The Tale of the King of Greece') falls within the focus of this study. 'Scéal Rí na Gréige' presents a version of the wellknown international folktale type ATU 707:'Three Golden Children’. The author examines the type's dissemination in lreland, and provides its classification into four ecotypes. Despite its wide distribution in the lrish oral tradition, the author suggests that the story known to Ó Caiside came from the printed medium - from a popular version of The Arabian Nights Entertainments. To be understood by the lrish-speaking audience, the story was rendered in the vernacular; yet, its key elements were articulated in English, embellishing the plot with a flavour of exoticism and of the faraway lands.'Scéal Rí na Gréigei, a unique folklore product, marries the lrish vernacular to the European print culture. It represents a true testimony to Séamus Ó Caiside's inquisitive mind and creative genius, and signifies an innovative step in the development of the lrish oral tradition.
Fomin, Maxim, “‘Dá síortha gus an Innia...’: what did Cú Chulainn say to Conchobhar in Oidheadh Chloinne Uisneach?”, in: Ailbhe Ó Corráin, Fionntán de Brún, and Maxim Fomin (eds), Scotha cennderca cen on: a Festschrift for Séamus Mac Mathúna, 10, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2020. 63–76.
Ó Corráin, Ailbhe, Fionntán de Brún, and Maxim Fomin (eds), Scotha cennderca cen on: a Festschrift for Séamus Mac Mathúna, Studia Celtica Upsaliensia, 10, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2020.  
abstract:
This volume comprises a celebratory collection of articles presented to Séamus Mac Mathúna on the occasion of his 75th birthday and launched at the 17th International Symposium of Societas Celtologica Nordica held in Uppsala on 7–10 May 2020. The volume brings together papers contributed by Séamus' friends and colleagues in the broad areas of Literature, Language, Folklore and the History of Celtic Studies and includes an introductory appreciation of his contribution to the discipline. Literary papers deal with the hero and antihero in Indo-European literatures, Irish heroic literature, Irish voyage literature, Irish bardic poetry, seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Irish poetry and twentieth-century Irish literature. The Language section includes articles on Ogham inscriptions, Irish and Scottish dialectology, Irish place names and lexical compounds in Welsh. Papers in Folklore and the History of Celtic Studies deal with folktales, the question of native legend and borrowing, the translation of Irish material into Armenian, the collection of folklore in Co. Tyrone, Irish manuscripts in North America, lexicography in nineteenth-century Belfast, and connections between Gaelic and Arabic in the development of Celtic Studies as a discipline. The volume concludes with a comprehensive list of the publications of Séamus Mac Mathúna.
Jones, Aled Llion, and Maxim Fomin (eds), Y geissaw chwedleu: proceedings of the 7th International Colloquium of Societas Celto-Slavica, Studia Celto-Slavica, 8, Bangor: University of Wales, Bangor, 2018.
Fomin, Maxim, “Hunting the deer in Celtic and Indo-European mythological contexts”, in: Emily Lyle (ed.), Celtic myth in the 21st century: the gods and their stories in a global perspective, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2018. 73–87.
Toner, Gregory [director], Maxim Fomin, Grigory Bondarenko, Thomas Torma, Caoimhín Ó Dónaill, and Hilary Lavelle, eDIL: electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, revised ed., Online: Royal Irish Academy, 2013–present. URL: <http://edil.qub.ac.uk>. 
Electronic internet edition of the Dictionary of the Irish language.
Fomin, Maxim, Instructions for kings: secular and clerical images of kingship in early Ireland and ancient India, Heidelberg: Carl Winter Universitätsverlag, 2013.
Fomin, Maxim, Alvard Jivanyan, and Séamus Mac Mathúna (eds), Ireland and Armenia: studies in language, history and narrative, Washington, D.C.: Institute for the Study of Man, 2013.
Internet Archive: <link>
Fomin, Maxim, “ [Review of: Mac Cana, Proinsias, The cult of the sacred centre. Essays on Celtic ideology, Dublin: School of Celtic Studies, DIAS, 2011. viii + 344 pp.]”, Éigse 38 (2013): 360–366.
– Ulster Institutional Repository: <link>
Fomin, Maxim, Václav Blažek, and Piotr Stalmaszczyk (eds), Transforming traditions: studies in archaeology, comparative linguistics and narrative: proceedings of the Fifth International Colloquium of Societas Celto-Slavica, held at Příbram, 26–29 July 2010, Studia Celto-Slavica, 6, Łódź: Łódź University Press, 2012. 214 pp.
Eprints.ulster.ac.uk: <link>
Fomin, Maxim, “The Sanskrit legacy of Whitley Stokes”, in: Elizabeth Boyle, and Paul Russell (eds), The tripartite life of Whitley Stokes (1830-1909), Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011. 98–110.
Fomin, Maxim, Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Victoria Vertogradova, “Foreword and introduction”, in: Maxim Fomin, Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Victoria Vertogradova (eds), Sacred topology of early Ireland and ancient India: religious paradigm shift, 57, Washington: Institute for the Study of Man, 2010. ix–xiv.
Fomin, Maxim, “A newly discovered fragment of the early Irish wisdom-text Tecosca Cormaic in TCD MS 1298 (H. 2. 7)”, in: Piotr Stalmaszczyk, and Maxim Fomin (eds), Dimensions and categories of Celticity: studies in literature and culture. Proceedings of the Fourth International Colloquium of the Learned Association Societas Celto-Slavica held at the University of Lódz between 13-15 September 2009, vol. 2, 5, Lódz University Press, 2010. 159–169.
Brozović-Rončević, Dunja, Maxim Fomin, and Ranko Matasović (eds), Celts and Slavs in central and southeastern Europe: proceedings of the Third International Colloquium of the Societas Celto-Slavica, Dubrovnik, September 18–20, 2008, Studia Celto-Slavica, 3, Zagreb: Institut za hrvatski jezik i jezikoslovlje, 2010. 324 pp.
Fomin, Maxim, “And his cloak covered the whole island: stories of religious conversion in Pāli and Medieval Irish narrative traditions”, in: Maxim Fomin, Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Victoria Vertogradova (eds), Sacred topology of early Ireland and ancient India: religious paradigm shift, 57, Washington: Institute for the Study of Man, 2010. 195–240.
Stalmaszczyk, Piotr, and Maxim Fomin (eds), Dimensions and categories of Celticity: studies in language. Proceedings of the Fourth International Colloquium of the Learned Association Societas Celto-Slavica held at the University of Lódz between 13-15 September 2009, vol. 1, Studia Celto-Slavica, 4, Lódz University Press, 2010. 132 pp.
– Ulster Institutional Repository: pp. 3-132: <link>
Fomin, Maxim, “And his cloak covered the whole island: legends of religious conversion (in Pāli and medieval Irish traditions)”, in: Maxim Fomin, Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Victoria Vertogradova (eds), Sacred topology of early Ireland and ancient India: religious paradigm shift, 57, Washington: Institute for the Study of Man, 2010. 195–240.  
abstract:
This paper is devoted to the comparison of two stories from early Sri Lankan and medieval Irish narrative traditions to do with phenomena of religious conversion and change. Central to the narratives of conversion recorded in both traditions is the theme of the covering of the land by a mantle that belongs to the messengers of the new religion. The primary semantic content of the cloth-covering motif is investigated in relation to the key aspects of the typologically related early Irish and early Indian paradigms of kingship. These include the subjugation by a hero of the malignant aspect of the land to be conquered, the blessings of righteous kingship, and the related topic of abundance. He also discusses traditions relating to both Irish and Indian royal inauguration practices, including rituals and objects, and, in particular, land acquisition and ritual practice.
(source: eprints.ulster.ac.uk)
Stalmaszczyk, Piotr, and Maxim Fomin (eds), Dimensions and categories of Celticity: studies in literature and culture. Proceedings of the Fourth International Colloquium of the Learned Association Societas Celto-Slavica held at the University of Lódz between 13-15 September 2009, vol. 2, Studia Celto-Slavica, 5, Lódz University Press, 2010.
Fomin, Maxim, Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Victoria Vertogradova (eds), Sacred topology of early Ireland and ancient India: religious paradigm shift, Journal of Indo-European Studies, Monograph Series, 57, Washington: Institute for the Study of Man, 2010.
Fomin, Maxim, “Bríatharthecosc Con Culainn in the context of early Irish wisdom-literature”, in: Ruairí Ó hUiginn, and Brian Ó Catháin (eds), Ulidia 2: proceedings of the Second International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Maynooth 24-27 July 2005, Maynooth: An Sagart, 2009. 140–172.
– University of Ulster: eprint: <link>
Bondarenko, Grigory, Maxim Fomin, Hilary Lavelle, Gregory Toner [director], Thomas Torma, and Caoimhín Ó Dónaill, eDIL: electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, 1st digital ed., Online: Royal Irish Academy, 2007–present. URL: <https://www.dil.ie>. 
Electronic internet edition of the Dictionary of the Irish language.
Fomin, Maxim, “Classifications of kings in early Ireland and India”, Studia Celtica Fennica 4 (2007): 31–46.
 : <link>
Mac Mathúna, Séamus, and Maxim Fomin (eds), Parallels between Celtic and Slavic: proceedings of the First International Colloquium on Links and Parallels between Celtic and Slavic Traditions, held at the University of Ulster, Coleraine, 19–21 June 2005, Studia Celto-Slavica, 1, Coleraine: TSO Publishers, 2006.
Fomin, Maxim, and Gregory Toner, “Digitizing a dictionary of medieval Irish: the eDIL project”, Literary and Linguistic Computing 21 (April, 2006): 83–90.  
abstract:

The Centre for Irish and Celtic Studies at the University of Ulster is currently producing a digital dictionary of medieval Irish (eDIL) based on the standard Dictionary of the Irish Language published by the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. This paper addresses some of the problems encountered in the digitization process, including data capture, processing non-standard characters, modifications to the TEI guidelines, automatic generation of tags, and the establishment of a lexical view while preserving the original format of the paper dictionary.

Fomin, Maxim, “On the notions of death, navigation and the otherworld”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 47 (Summer, 2004): 73–80.


Sources

No published sources recorded. Try related subjects (if any) instead.
The following does not refer to the present page, but to the data record for the currently selected query subject. It is not yet accessible on its own.